WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPOSITION: Get Better Wildlife Images With The Right Composition Techniques

WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPOSITION: Get Better Wildlife Images With The Right Composition Techniques



oh he did turn the other way yeah definitely manual focusing here we go mornin it's a little early I mean a little late actually it's like what almost not even seven huh still not even so it's like 6:40 probably should have been on here like an hour and a half ago but uh there's a big mountain over there to the east and takes the Sun a lot longer to get over it so today I want to talk to you guys about composition in wildlife so if if you want to learn some other stuff I'm not gonna be going over like technical settings and all that because I've already done a couple videos on that and those are right here for more check those out but reason why I'm down here is because there's some really weird random frogs over there like baby frogs and I want to shoot them in the face and along with the composition part and I mentioned this before my wildlife videos but I always find that it's better if you can get lower to their level and in this case these baby frogs are like stupid tiny so I'm basically just laying down in the dirt in the middle of this path in Albuquerque hopefully no one needs this path right now but I think you'll notice the difference here in these two shots I definitely prefer the one where I'm lower to the frogs eye level I think it looks a lot better so we actually came out here to look for some birds so I'm gonna go find some birds and get off the ground [Applause] see all that stuff as cotton fluff in New Mexico and the summertime looks like it snows because of the cottonwood trees they put out all their cotton you fluffy stuff gets everywhere even on those all of those little froggies which there are like thousands of they're like everywhere on the floor but there's a Tanager up there let's see if I can find it because if black-headed grosbeak yeah that little blob that just flew into that little tree back there we're gonna wait for it to come a little closer shoot so while I'm waiting for that grosbeak to come a little closer let's talk about one thing real quick so in terms of composition at least for me wildlife autofocus takes precedent so what do I mean by that I mean that when I shoot wildlife I would rather have a shot that's in focus rather than out of focus of course right so usually to do that and I mentioned this in my other videos is I will tend to use the center autofocus point a single center autofocus point especially for small or flappy birds like this and those little tiny frogs and stuff that are real tiny I don't want the the center autofocus is the fastest autofocus point and it's the most accurate no matter what camera you have so that can really put a strain on the artistic side and putting the composition how you want it and getting that right in camera so that's when basically I'm going to be cropping so a lot of my composition and wildlife is going to be due to cropping and when I say cropping I don't mean like cropping for the sake of like filling the frame although sometimes that's necessary but in this case I really mean cropping in order to put the animal or the bird or whatever the subject is where I want it in the frame so if I want to crop this image to where the bird is on the third like the bird's head is on the third here that's going to look a lot better so another thing that you should pay attention to when you're composing wildlife images is not to get especially their heads too close to the frame so if their head is close to a frame then you want them looking the opposite direction if they're looking out of the frame then you want a little bit of a gap between their head and the edge of the frame that way it doesn't look cut off and it looks a little more balanced and it's much more pleasing to the eye all right he's not coming closer move on there's a giant dragonfly thingy right there I don't know what it is look like that hey you just feel like the blue and the red ones let me just show you cuz he's not going anywhere all right so it came back to tingly pong we're in tingly pond in Albuquerque if you guys are wondering and those trees right over there is a crap-ton of cormorants attempted to say they're Nia tropic cormorants I haven't checked yet they could be double crested but either way they're gonna do laps around this pond and that's the perfect time to shoot them in the face while they fly right towards us so son at my back Birds over there alright I'm gonna wrap it up here it's getting really hot and birds are kind of going away now so a couple of things that I wanted to mention about composition and Wildlife are don't forget that wildlife doesn't have to just be completely in their face fulfil the frame cropped in I think in a lot of my wildlife I really enjoy telling the story and showing a little more the environment and sometimes you kind of have to do that anyways sometimes you're shooting flappy birds or you shoot a little tiny flappy bird and sometimes you're just shooting animals that are like really far away and sometimes that can be like a bummer you know like you just want to get closer and you want to get it like just in their face just macro in their eyes you know but telling the story and putting them in the in their homes and in their environment and stuff can look really good especially if you have some interesting light or weather going on or just a really cool background so like this shot you know I probably in this case I probably actually could have gotten a little closer because these deer are pretty tame and I could have they're pretty used to humans I could have got a little closer but I really love the silhouette I love the atmosphere I love the clouds and the mountains and everything and so I chose to not zoom in as much and not get as close and to stay back and I think that just made for an overall better shot and then when you're doing stuff like that the rules of composition still applies the rule of thirds negative space you know all that kind of stuff and that's certainly not to say that every shot needs to adhere to the rule of thirds and needs to adhere to balance and negative space and all that stuff but those are just the guidelines and if you want to know more about that stuff in general for just general photography I have a great video on just composition as a whole right here I definitely think the most of important thing as a whole is just make sure you're paying attention with wildlife especially where you're putting the subject where the subjects eyes are where the focus is make sure their heads not too close to the frame if it is make sure they're looking the opposite direction that really helps out a lot if they're looking out of the frame like I said before back them up a little bit make sure you leave a little room shoot a little wider and that kind of stuff will really help your image overall all right the second breakfast time I'm starving do you guys have any questions about anything that I went over it didn't go over concerning composition and wildlife leave those in the comments below and I'll definitely answer them hit that like button if you enjoyed this video thanks for watching I'll see in the next one

7 thoughts on “WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY COMPOSITION: Get Better Wildlife Images With The Right Composition Techniques

  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    great video man, i really like your accessible presenting style 🙂

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Tips I can use, thanks Brent.

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Very informative video, loved it.

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Nice video! Thank you for the helpful informationđź‘Ť

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Thanks Brent, very helpful.

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Your Camera Hu mane Dolar

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Great video.. Wish I was there.. Clouds rain here in Indiana..

    Reply

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