Why can’t we just print money to pay off debt?

Why can’t we just print money to pay off debt?


Have you ever wondered why countries can’t
just print more money to off their debts… or to feed the homeless or fix unemployment,
or any other issue for that matter. Now, this may seem like a rather silly question,
but I think it may be one of those questions people might be a bit too embarrassed to ask,
but there’s shortage of people wondering. The short answer can be summed up in just
one word… inflation. Inflation is defined as “a persistent, substantial rise in the
general level of prices related to an increase in the volume of money and resulting in the
loss of value of currency”. But I’ll get to that… first though, we need
to establish exactly what money… is. Now this may seem obvious, but something that’s
important to know, is that money, has absolutely no… intrinsic value. What that means is
that money in itself has no actual value, it’s only considered valuable because it can
buy things, but if you were stranded on a desert island, money would be totally useless.
Money only has value because we believe it has value. This is called the Tinkerbell Effect,
something I learned about from Vsauce. The Tinkerbell Effect is used to describe
something that only exists because we believe it exists.
And this is the case with money. Hypothetically speaking, if people suddenly started to believe
that money had no value… it wouldn’t have any value.
Of course it wasn’t always this way, money has been around for millennia, and when it
was first used it was in the form of commodity money. Things were traded that had actual
value and uses, like salt, spices, horses or weapons. As well as this precious metals
such as gold as silver, which technically don’t have any intrinsic value either, but
due to their rarely are almost universally as currency.
Then we have representative money. Since carrying around everything you own can be difficult,
representative money makes more sense. Basically you give your gold to a bank and they keep
it safe for you, and in return they give you a piece of paper acknowledging that you own
that gold. These pieces of paper can therefore used as money as anyone can go and redeem
the gold at any time. But today, almost every country in the world
uses fiat money. Fiat money requires faith and trust in the government that their money
will have value. If we use a relatively young country as an
example, the United States has gone through all three monetary systems within 200 years.
In 1792, when the US stopped using European money. The Coinage Act of 1792 brought the
inception of the US dollar. The US dollar was originally in the form of commodity money
in the form of gold, silver and copper coins. The coins were actually made from real gold,
silver and copper, and the value of the metal that made the coins, were exactly equal to
their face value. The country then moved onto a mixture of commodity
and representative money with the 1900 Gold Standard Act. The government issued dollar
bills which could be exchanged for gold at any time.
Gold Standard is a type of representative money that money countries used at the time.
This was an effective way to accurately calculate the exchange rate between countries.
For example, if one gram of gold costs £1 in Britain and $1.50 in America, then you
can easily deduce that £1 equals $1.50. Gold coins were discontinued and the silver
was removed from the other coins, effectively ending commodity money.
In 1971, Richard Nixon officially abandoned the Gold Standard, and the US moved onto fiat
money. So money today isn’t back by gold or anything
else of value for that matter. So back to the question at hand; basic economics
tells us that an increase in supply, results in a fall in demand and therefore a fall in
price. So the more money in the economy, the lower the value of each dollar. Meaning other
countries can purchase more dollars in exchange for their currency.
A second supply and demand graph shows why this leads to a rise in prices. More money
in the economy causes a shift in the demand curve for goods and services, but since this
isn’t matched by in increase in economic output, prices must rise.
Look at it this way, if the government printed a million dollars and posted it to everyone
in the country, causing everyone to go out to buy a sports cars… but there’s only a
finite number of sports in the country. If we use an analogy to demonstrate this…
imagine there’s 4 people on a desert island, they each have 10 pieces of fruit each. All
fruits are considered equal in value. Now imagine they discover a whole forest of
apple trees. The nominal value of apples has increased because there’s more of them, but
the actual value of an apple has gone down due to an increase in supply.
Therefore it now costs 10 apples for 1 banana since demand for apples is low, but high for
bananas. Just to clarify, in this analogy, the people
represent different countries, the fruits their respective currency, and the apples
tree is the printed money. But it’s not only because of economic theory
that we know printing too much money is bad idea, there’s several examples throughout
recent history. The most recently example is Zimbabwe. Who,
in 2008, suffered extremely high inflation due to printing money.
This was the result of some awful decisions by the president Robert Mugabe.
When the economy took a turn for the worse, Mugabe printed more money to pay government
expenditure. This caused inflation to skyrocket, and, in
mid-November 2008, Zimbabwe’s inflation peaked at… actually wait hold on a second, first
I need to provide some context. Inflation in the United States is around 2%,
economists generally agree that inflation level around 1-3% are optimum. First-world
countries’ inflation rates today range from 0-5%. A country is said to have enter hyperinflation
when their inflation levels exceed 50%. So… with that in mind, Zimbabwe’s inflation,
at its peak, reached… 6.5… sextillion %. Or to put it another way… that number
has 22 digits. It got so bad that prices doubled every 24
hours. The government tried to solve the problem by printed more and more money with higher
and higher denominations. They also kept knocking zeroes off the end
by re-valuing the Zimbabwean dollar 3 times, going through 4 different types of currency
with 4 different ISO codes. Before the final re-denomination, they were
printing 100 trillion dollar bills. People were literally using wheelbarrows full
of cash to buy a loaf of bread. The government even made inflation illegal
at one point and people were actually arrested for raising prices.
In 2009, the Zimbabwean dollar was abandoned and to this day they still have no national
currency, their people use currencies such as the US dollar, the Pound Sterling, and
the Euro. Before the hyperinflation, the first Zimbabwean dollar was worth about 1.25 US
dollars. If that 100 trillion dollar bill was worth that exchange rate, that single
bill would be worth more money than there is in the entire world… twice.
But as ridiculous as this was, this is only considered to be the second worst inflation
in history, after Hungary in 1946. Although Zimbabwe’s inflation peaked in Mid-November
of 2008, their overall highest monthly inflation was 79.6 billion %, whereas Hungary’s highest
monthly inflation which took place in July 1946 was 41.9 quadrillion %. With prices doubling
every 15 hours. To put that into perspective, a country with
a healthy inflation level of around 3%, prices double every 23 years.
Their currency was called the pengo, and as inflation rose, the bil-pengo: short for billion
pengo. Which is actually one trillion pengo on the short-scale.
As well as the record for the highest monthly inflation, Hungary also holds the record for
the highest denomination banknote ever issued – the 100 million bil-pengo note. (ie – 100
million billion, or 100 quintillion). Which is 100 quintillion pengo on the short-scale.
1 milliard bil-pengo were printed but never issued.
In 1941, the exchange rate was about 5 pengo to 1 US dollar. In 1946, when the currency
was discontinued, things had gotten so out of hand, that if you took every single banknote
in the entire county, they would have a total value… of one tenth… of a US penny.
Hungary then switched the the forint, where 1 forint equalled 400 octillion pengos. That
number has 29 zeroes. So that’s why government can’t just print
money to pay off their debts, it does not end well.
It’s also important to understand exactly what national debt is. National debt is much
more complicated than personal debt. It isn’t simply a case of ‘you owe people money’. Take
the country with the highest National Debt – the United States, that currently has around
17 trillion dollars of debt, and you’re probably aware the country holds most US debt is…
China. Although that is true, it’s somewhat misleading. Of the total debt, China only
has about 8%. Most of the debt is actually owned by the United States government itself,
but organisations such as Social Security or the Federal Reserve.
On top of this, a further 30% is owned by US citizens.And even though 8% of 17 trillion
is still a lot, China can’t just knock on the door of the White House and demand 1.2
trillion dollars. It doesn’t work like that. Basically, the US Department of the Treasury
issue treasury bonds. You can buy these bonds and the government will pay you interest on
that bond every year, then, once the bonds have matured, they’ll buy the treasury bonds
back from you. Now, if a country gets into financial trouble,
it may have to default on its debt, which basically means you won’t get your money back.
But the US is generally considered an extremely risk-free investment because the US dollar
is the most widely used and most trust-worthy currency in the world. It’s even written into
the Constitution that the United States cannot default on its debt.
I’ll leave you with this final thought and what I think is possibly the best way to sum
up why governments can’t just print off unlimited amounts of money…
“If money grew on trees, it would be as valuable as leaves”
Thanks for watching!

100 thoughts on “Why can’t we just print money to pay off debt?

  • May 29, 2019 at 1:12 am
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    we cant we burn money then?

    Reply
  • May 29, 2019 at 8:02 am
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    Becouse there is no national debt. Only robbery from all humanity

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  • May 29, 2019 at 9:09 am
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    10 fucking minutes to explain inflation

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  • May 29, 2019 at 10:14 pm
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    To simplify, if you have a dollar, and you print another dollar, they both would go down to 50 cents so they both make a dollar.

    Reply
  • May 30, 2019 at 11:37 am
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    Inflation

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  • May 31, 2019 at 12:31 am
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    Zimbabwe government want to know your location

    Reply
  • June 1, 2019 at 5:13 am
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    Old town roads is full of weird comments…
    https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/threelly-ai-for-youtube/dfohlnjmjiipcppekkbhbabjbnikkibo

    Reply
  • June 2, 2019 at 10:37 pm
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    But my question is: Why doesnt this thing where If you print money it gets less valuable just not happen?

    Reply
  • June 3, 2019 at 2:10 pm
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    inflation

    Reply
  • June 7, 2019 at 6:29 am
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    Look, all I'm saying is that, I am so Sick and Fucking tired of living in a Controlled Society where we have to be careful what we spend and end up in the gutter all over just a bit of Worthless Green Paper.

    It's Fucking Useless.

    It's the Government, Fucking Blame Him.

    Reply
  • June 7, 2019 at 10:53 am
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    Really I thought it grew on trees

    Reply
  • June 8, 2019 at 7:03 am
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    Am I the only one who didn't understand a thing when I first saw this?

    Reply
  • June 8, 2019 at 9:24 pm
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    Still doesn't answer why money can't be printed to lay off that countries debt, That doesn't effect the people's pockets but could benefit the people by having to pay less in general due to the debt

    Reply
  • June 10, 2019 at 5:15 pm
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    It's called inflation😂

    Reply
  • June 12, 2019 at 10:31 am
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    Give people 1 million dollar each, then they all decided to buy sports cars. There were not enough sports cars, so they increase the price. Why not just make more sports cars with the money they earn?

    Reply
  • June 12, 2019 at 11:46 am
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    What about printing to pay debt to another country? This video looks at printing more money that enters the local economy…will the impact be the same if paying another country?

    Reply
  • June 13, 2019 at 11:19 am
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    Take that Venezuela

    Reply
  • June 13, 2019 at 12:51 pm
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    Not true at all cuz realistically everyone is not going to buy the same thing with $1000000 some people have no homes or have no businesses so they're more than likely to do that with the money than buy a sports car

    Reply
  • June 13, 2019 at 12:52 pm
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    And scene is that we control the adjustment of inflation and just like you said it would make sense to raise the price it would make sense to not raise the price cuz the same logic you use to raise the price you can use to explain why you wouldn't raise the price

    Reply
  • June 14, 2019 at 12:38 pm
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    Me: Print money to get rich
    Venezuela: No!
    Hungary: No!
    Germany: No!
    Zimbabwe: No!

    Reply
  • June 15, 2019 at 11:38 pm
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    Goverment collects taxes in the money they issue. Money is therefore very valuable. Everybody needs it to meet its tax obligation.

    Reply
  • June 16, 2019 at 12:00 pm
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    What happens when a country experiences deflation?

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  • June 18, 2019 at 4:09 am
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    Debt? I OWE EUROPE!

    Reply
  • June 18, 2019 at 3:41 pm
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    Because it decreases the worth of money.
    Just saved you 10 minutes of your life

    Reply
  • June 20, 2019 at 8:38 pm
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    Leaves are valuable

    Reply
  • June 21, 2019 at 1:32 am
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    We call it Quantitative Easing

    Reply
  • June 21, 2019 at 11:16 pm
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    Venezuela has joined the game

    Reply
  • June 22, 2019 at 3:56 am
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    Money can not pay off our debt because what we consider “money”, or dollar bills are in it of itself debt. Look on a dollar bill, on its face, at the top it says “Federal Reserve Note”. The word note in financial terms means debt. This debt was once a debit against gold, which is real money, but today, that is no longer the case. You can’t pay off debt with more debt

    Reply
  • June 22, 2019 at 5:00 am
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    Bullshit! The Canadian government used to print money in the 1970's if needed. For example they would have new money printed for such things as social programs. It didn't change a thing. It is ROTHSCHILD who manufactures all financial crisis. He has his tentacles every where. Rothschild is the worst SINNER on the (flat) earth. The Lord GOD rebuke Rothschild, Amen! Remember the Bible says, The Love of money is the root of all Evil. He loves money the most, therefore he is Evil.

    Reply
  • June 22, 2019 at 6:03 pm
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    Wat about humans?
    If i use my slaves as money are they worthless?
    Hypothetical question btw

    Reply
  • June 23, 2019 at 3:57 pm
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    The government debt is owed to….. The government 🤔

    Reply
  • June 26, 2019 at 7:15 pm
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    Wait then why don't countries just print less money to increase the value? 1 dollars could cost 10 pounds if the us printed less money? And why is thd japanese currency less valuable than usd but the citizens are doing (financially) far better than the us? I am still so confuse.

    Reply
  • June 27, 2019 at 3:08 am
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    Why? Because hyperinflation debases and depreciates the overall value of a currency. The more of something there is, the less its worth.

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  • June 27, 2019 at 9:58 pm
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    You talk to fucking fast. Slow the fuck done

    Reply
  • June 28, 2019 at 5:21 am
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    Print it in seceret and the ecenomy wont fail

    Reply
  • June 28, 2019 at 11:54 am
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    6:23 “I promise to pay the bearer on demand ONE HUNDRED TRILLION DOLLARS for the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe.”

    Reply
  • June 28, 2019 at 4:04 pm
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    That is awesome thank you for expanding my mind.

    Reply
  • June 29, 2019 at 11:04 pm
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    200 of those half cent coins to purchase an AZ ice tea? wow 🤣

    Reply
  • June 30, 2019 at 11:42 am
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    Pre 1964 coins (except the penny) still have some silver in them

    Reply
  • June 30, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Thats why we use soups 😝

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 4:33 am
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    This video is nonsense. The US government literally prints money to pay off its debt daily.

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 4:36 am
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    Money does grow on trees, and it is LESS valuable than leaves.

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 4:40 am
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    Because muh inflation.

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    nineteen fourtysex

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 2:32 pm
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    Why not printing LESS money?

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 9:57 pm
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    Hasn't America been doing just that since Nixon taking the dollar of the gold reserves

    Reply
  • July 2, 2019 at 12:44 am
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    Because Banks don't want you to be able to do this. Only they can print money and loan it to you.

    Reply
  • July 2, 2019 at 5:11 pm
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    No money. No debt. No animals being killed to make money like dogs and horses in racing. People yell about how many horses and dogs die, ignoring what motivates people to do what they do.

    Reply
  • July 3, 2019 at 9:05 am
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    This video shouln't exist beacuse its obvious that your money is losing value the more you print

    Reply
  • July 5, 2019 at 2:31 am
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    Reminder that money is printed by private people and not by the governments.
    Money is in the hand of PRIVATE PEOPLE. And the governments are in debt of hundreds of billions to these private people. Let that go through your head…

    Reply
  • July 5, 2019 at 1:54 pm
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    What’s the short and long scale

    Reply
  • July 6, 2019 at 7:24 pm
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    Our system is based on the continual ability to CREATE DEBT. The Fed creates it out of thin air and some damn sucker buys it. We call it "fractional reserve banking. The latest sucker is Saudi Arabia. The whole world is awash in debt and only getting worse. This wont end well. Get your metals.

    Reply
  • July 6, 2019 at 9:31 pm
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    Gee!! I hope the Central banksters don't see this.

    Reply
  • July 7, 2019 at 12:44 am
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    According to Alan Greenspan, we can.

    Reply
  • July 7, 2019 at 5:55 pm
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    Why can't I just print toothpaste to brush my teeth?

    Reply
  • July 7, 2019 at 9:21 pm
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    Why can't we just lower the price on consumer goods and products?

    Reply
  • July 8, 2019 at 1:43 am
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    Money is a measure of value. An abstract concept. Currency is the familiar federal reserve note or bank note. The physical instrument that represents that measure of value.

    Most money is produced by advancing credit and is not simply created out of “thin air.”

    It is important to distinguish between the measure and the instrument that represents it. The instrument is invariably manipulated so that the same number on the face of a certificate represents different actual values at different points in time. A $100 bank note today has less purchasing power than it did 5 years ago and also when more currency is printed than money created.

    Example:

    Assume that the total supply of money is $1,000…000,000.00. (one x-zillion, half-mile long chain of zeroes omitted for clarity). At this stage that is the starting point in our discussion the supply of currency is also one x-zillion that is identical to the supply of money.

    A borrower obtains a loan for $1000 that he agrees to pay back with $35 interest.

    The lender makes an entry in its ledger, crediting the account of the borrower. The total supply of money (that is a measure of value) remains unchanged (one x-zillion).

    An employer pays the borrower $1,035 in wages being the value of his work. Alternatively, a customer pays the borrower that is a merchant $1,035 for the value of his purchases. Either way $1,035 in new value was created by activity in the marketplace. The borrower repays the loan (with existing currency).

    The total supply of money is now $1,000…000,000.00 + $1,035.00 = $1,000…001,035.00.

    The total supply of currency remains $1,000…000,000.00.

    The central bank may print $1,035 in new federal reserve notes in order to bring the amount of currency in line with the total money supply. The amount of money created is $1,035 and is not merely $35 that is the amount of interest.

    The lender receives $1,035 being repaid with existing currency plus the central bank may print $1,035 in new currency. The central bank is the beneficiary of the lion’s share, as $1,000 of newly created value accrues to it while $35 of this newly created value accrues to the lender.

    If the face value of newly printed bank notes is less than $1,035 or if none at all are printed the value of the dollar currency will increase. Especially as viewed by outsiders. If the face value of newly printed bank notes is greater than $1,035 then the value of the dollar currency will decrease. Outsiders perceive a dilution, as the number represented by currency is larger than the addition to value of newly created money.

    This example assumes that the wages paid or merchandise sold is the amount of new value created, but in practice marketplace efficiency is somewhat less, with a smaller portion being new value created.

    Footnotes:

    If the borrower only realizes $813 instead of the full $1,035 that was earned through his effort in the marketplace, due to insolvency of employer or customer, then $813 is the measure of new value created. Even if the borrower repays the full amount of the loan that is $1,035 by making up the difference out of his own pocket the amount of money created in the marketplace remains $813 and only $813 in new currency may be printed. This entire benefit accrues to the central bank, while the lender loses money.

    The lender makes a loan of $1,000 with a negative interest rate so that the borrower repays $1,000 minus $35 deducted in negative interest. In this instance the lender is repaid $965 and loses money, but the central bank gains money and may print $965 in new currency representing the new value created in this transaction, the entirety of the new value accruing to the central bank.

    Any currency printed in excess of $1,035 in the example above is the portion derived from “thin air.”

    Countries that do not adhere to these parameters soon find their currency is worthless. Where an elevated level of demand for currency is dictated by being the reserve currency, such as in the case of the “petro” dollar, these bounds may be greatly exceeded. A favorable trade balance enables these bounds to be slightly exceeded in proportion to the surplus, or greatly exceeded where the trade surplus is large. This action prevents the currency from becoming too strong and harming exports. Trade deficits are snares with political pressure to print more at a time when the amount of new currency printed should be reduced. The limit is reached when the amount of currency printed each month equals the sum of payments made on corporate and personal debts, i.e., all current debts regardless of their nature, during this same period. In a process titled quantitative easing the central bank purchases non-performing corporate bonds and shreds them so that this threshold is not exceeded and the currency remains viable and does not collapse. Policies of the central banks are largely decided by the Bank of International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland.

    Reply
  • July 8, 2019 at 4:08 am
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    The government knows that's why only 1.7 tril cash 400tril derivatives 45tril debt.debt base system ..genus.😀

    Reply
  • July 8, 2019 at 5:06 pm
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    Right, but what if we all agreed that no matter how much money there is nobody is going to raise prices.
    I'm not saying that we should do that, it probably would be a fucking disaster to enforce that, but hypothetically…

    That would work, right?

    Reply
  • July 9, 2019 at 11:46 am
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    In a short: More money: less it's price is.

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  • July 9, 2019 at 5:34 pm
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    This video convinced me to move to Antarctica so I dont have to worry about inflation

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  • July 10, 2019 at 2:00 am
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    Correction: Currency has no intrinsic value… money does, as it is a store of value.

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  • July 10, 2019 at 11:14 am
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    The federal reserve is the largest counterfitter

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  • July 10, 2019 at 3:57 pm
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    Debt is a bad thing you idiot. The reason why nations "invest" in American debt, is because it is the reserve currency due to the global racket scheme enforced by the US army.
    And it is triffin's dilemma that ensures that the US will always have a trade deficit, for as long as the racket can be maintained. And that is finite, because this trade deficit is slowly but surely destroying the US economy, its production base.

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  • July 10, 2019 at 5:35 pm
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    Printing money is America's default. The dollar will be worth fuck all soon.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 6:42 pm
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    Yhh if you have money u could call a private jet into the island to save you if you were loaded

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  • July 12, 2019 at 6:39 am
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    Really? ? Explain then how Banks just Produce funds from Fresh Air and then have the Neck to Demand people not just pay interest on Invented funds but to also pay back money that Never Existed? How the Fook does that work??

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  • July 12, 2019 at 1:20 pm
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    2:15 You said 1972 instead of 1792

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  • July 12, 2019 at 4:11 pm
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    What if the US change the money for gold from other countries or make investment in other countries.

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  • July 12, 2019 at 6:19 pm
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    yeah but still after printing the money and pay the debt why dont they keep it all of it in the bank instead deliver them to everyone?
    still dont get where does the money goes after you print them and why

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  • July 13, 2019 at 10:18 am
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    Some debts can be payed off with printing, an important distinction that needs to be made. The Loans given as an example in this video were made by an entity that had to earn US dollars through labor, which indeed cannot be payed off with printed money, as this would result in an increase in the money supply and therefore a devaluation of the currency. However, loans made by Banks are created out of thin air, these debts CAN be forgiven without further increasing the money supply by having the Central Bank purchase the non-performing loans from the Banks and then forgiving the debt. I.e. a fairly simple bookkeeping trick.

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  • July 14, 2019 at 1:16 pm
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    So if you print more money you get inflation.
    Now that may not necessarily be totally true as the economy also grows with the growing number of people.
    Resulting in a need for more money volume.

    But apart from that what do you care about some extra inflation (as long as it doesn't spiral out of control obviously).
    You are trying to pay off debt. Because of this extra inflation the value of your debt decreases.
    Which is not a bad thing if you're trying to repay it.

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  • July 14, 2019 at 5:30 pm
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    Somebody needs to find out how to print the American dollar. The world would quickly know peace

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  • July 15, 2019 at 10:31 pm
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    01:21
    You forgot to mention food and water, shelter, among other things.

    That's why this poor figure on this island has nothing to survive on.
    Narrator's mistake.

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  • July 16, 2019 at 12:28 am
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    Because they're saying they have cool stuff and they're not going to tell you about it.

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  • July 17, 2019 at 4:00 am
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    USA DOLLAR backed not by oil..but the threat of nueclear war …nice….that is why Ausralia and other nations with oil reserves do not refine there own petrol….all western goverments are criminal….

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  • July 18, 2019 at 4:47 pm
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    You do realise that almost every country does print money out of thin air every day. The British pound was the last money that was gold backed. Not anymore. They stop making one cent coins in Australia because of the copper was worth more than the coin.

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  • July 18, 2019 at 8:00 pm
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    You do realise all banks are privatly owned

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  • July 19, 2019 at 2:51 am
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    But what if the government printed more money but didn’t tell anyone about it nor publish it, just use it to pay the debt ?

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  • July 22, 2019 at 8:51 pm
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    Where is this excess money since the middle class has less and less money to spend? Hasn't it occured to you that interest on the huge government and private sector can also increase prices? Why does the state borrow when it has the power to create money? The debt comes from having private banks create the entire money supply through loans which, I'm sure you'll agree, is completely absurd.

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  • July 23, 2019 at 2:53 am
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    The DeRothschilds are responsible for the devaluation of national currencies, through debt and pernicious usury. Colour it any way you like, that's the facts Jack.

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  • July 23, 2019 at 4:46 am
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    Buts that's exactly what the US is doing.

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  • July 23, 2019 at 6:40 am
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    Wrong : Gold & Silver is REAL MONEY !
    Fiat paper notes are CURRENCY !

    Reply
  • July 23, 2019 at 11:06 pm
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    All of this has nothing to do with who control the flow of money and why is there poor/rich people always at odd/

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  • July 24, 2019 at 1:25 am
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    If it wasn't for Ignorance our money wouldn't have any backing at all. Let that sink in!

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  • July 24, 2019 at 1:33 am
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    The obvious solution is to default on the national debt. Return to the gold standard. Use the anti trust laws ( draft new ones if necessary) to break up the FRB money cartel and confiscate their real wealth and sentence them to life in prison.

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  • July 24, 2019 at 1:49 am
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    I still remember when Walter Mondale ( Jimmy Carter's VP ) said that he believed that inflation was caused by the mythical belief that the economy must grow at a rapid pace. Just goes to show how ignorant the politicians think we are.

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  • July 24, 2019 at 1:09 pm
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    We can only print money to save the bankers and plutocrats.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 1:47 am
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    The fed can !!!!

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  • July 26, 2019 at 9:45 pm
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    Wii, It prints money!

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  • July 27, 2019 at 9:06 am
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    Captions: 1940 sex

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  • July 29, 2019 at 7:58 pm
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    “Why can’t we just print money to pay off debt?”
    Because money would become worthless and not worth the paper it’s printed on. (By the way, here in the UK it’s fake paper made of plastic)

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  • July 30, 2019 at 10:00 pm
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    Banks and stock exchange traders "prints" fake money all the time, calling it "options", "hedgefonds" "new share emission" or else. When selling these, they get real assets in return. When too much has been flushed into the market a "finance crash" is announced. The banks then keep the assets, the investors go bankrupt. This is regularly going on, in cycles of about each 10th year. If a big bank or company is threatened by the crash, they´re sometimes rescued with federal tax money. Feel cheated? You are!

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  • August 1, 2019 at 3:26 pm
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    Ah Mugabe you dick

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  • August 2, 2019 at 1:45 pm
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    Government must run a deficit because if it does not then the rest of the economy must be in deficit to fund the government surplus. Or we have deflation.

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  • August 3, 2019 at 1:51 pm
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    I have an idea : print money without eveybody knowing about it

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  • August 4, 2019 at 9:35 pm
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    I learned the tinker bell effect from vsauce

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