20 thoughts on “Where to Focus and How to Take Sharp Landscape Photos

  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    This video is kindly supported by PhotoGuard. Get an instant quote and a 10% discount which is applied when using this URL: http://www.photoguard.co.uk/nttl10

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Great video! Where was it filmed? It looks familiar…

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Not true. Hyperfocal distance literally means everything is in focus from the focus point to infinity; the background will not be soft..

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Excellent video…really superb. I loved his advice on choosing the best f stop..

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    AMAZING TEACHING! did you focus manual on that 5m distance point?

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    This is the least academic way to teach hahaha good though

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Just use multi focus points,
    Pick what you want in focus,
    Job done

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Thanks a lot for this excellent explanation.
    I only have one question: if apertures smaller than f/13 provoke diffraction and create
    visible softness…. why do modern cameras can go down to even f/22?
    Is there any situation where such small apertures can be useful anyway? Thanks

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Thanks a lot for this excellent explanation.
    I only have one question: if apertures smaller than f/13 provoke diffraction and create
    visible softness…. why do modern cameras can go down to even f/22?
    Is there any situation where such small apertures can be useful anyway? Thanks

    Reply
  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Absolutely the best I’ve seen on the subject.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    By definition, when focusing hyperfocally, everything from 1/2 the hyperfocal distance to infinity will be acceptably sharp. "Double distance" focusing is primarily the same as shooting hyperfocally (I've been using this method for years). In this manner, I'm better able to control the composition. I simply compose the scene, check the distance of the nearest object in the frame that needs to be in focus, double that distance, then check my chart to select the aperture based on that doubled distance and lens' focal length. Of course, a lot depends on the Circle of Confusion variable that you use to set up the double distance focusing charts.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    What a breath of fresh air; a clear, informative, interesting and very professionally presented video. Ross, your presentation abilities shine in a Youtube world of mediocrity and irrelevance (how many footpaths must I watch photographers walk until I get to a point in the video where they say something interesting about taking a photograph?). I am currently having a re-think about focus in landscape photography because of inconsistent results and I found your clear and succinct summary of the options very helpful. The double-distance technique is new to me and I will give that a try. Many Thanks.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    With regard to point 2 to switch off image stabilization when you're using a tripod, that is not recommended for most Canon lenses manufactured in the last 4-5 years. If you have Canon lenses, check the manual for each lens to see what is recommended. I have 1 lens that I switch off image stabilization for when on a tripod (24-105 f/4 version 1), 3 that I leave on (16/35 f4 IS, 70-200 f2.8 IS II, 500 f4 IS II).

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Also take several shots, don't rely on the one you think is pin sharp only to find its slightly out when seen on a computer screen. sometimes the light changes so quick that you find the images just pops due to a slightly different light.

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    I can see the camera your using, but what lens is employed on this shot please

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  • May 28, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    Wow! Amazing tips! Thanking you from the Philippines.

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