The passing of time, caught in a single photo | Stephen Wilkes

The passing of time, caught in a single photo | Stephen Wilkes


I’m driven by pure passion to create photographs that tell stories. Photography can be described
as the recording of a single moment frozen within a fraction of time. Each moment or photograph
represents a tangible piece of our memories as time passes. But what if you could capture more
than one moment in a photograph? What if a photograph
could actually collapse time, compressing the best moments
of the day and the night seamlessly into one single image? I’ve created a concept
called “Day to Night” and I believe it’s going to change the way you look at the world. I know it has for me. My process begins by photographing
iconic locations, places that are part of what I call
our collective memory. I photograph from a fixed vantage point,
and I never move. I capture the fleeting moments
of humanity and light as time passes. Photographing for anywhere
from 15 to 30 hours and shooting over 1,500 images, I then choose the best moments
of the day and night. Using time as a guide, I seamlessly blend those best moments
into one single photograph, visualizing our conscious
journey with time. I can take you to Paris for a view from the Tournelle Bridge. And I can show you the
early morning rowers along the River Seine. And simultaneously, I can show you Notre Dame aglow at night. And in between, I can show you
the romance of the City of Light. I am essentially a street photographer
from 50 feet in the air, and every single thing you see
in this photograph actually happened on this day. Day to Night is a global project, and my work has always been about history. I’m fascinated by the concept
of going to a place like Venice and actually seeing it during
a specific event. And I decided I wanted to see
the historical Regata, an event that’s actually been
taking place since 1498. The boats and the costumes
look exactly as they did then. And an important element that I really
want you guys to understand is: this is not a timelapse, this is me photographing
throughout the day and the night. I am a relentless collector
of magical moments. And the thing that drives me
is the fear of just missing one of them. The entire concept came about in 1996. LIFE Magazine commissioned me
to create a panoramic photograph of the cast and crew of Baz Luhrmann’s
film Romeo + Juliet. I got to the set and realized:
it’s a square. So the only way I could actually create
a panoramic was to shoot a collage of 250 single images. So I had DiCaprio and Claire Danes
embracing. And as I pan my camera to the right, I noticed there was a mirror on the wall and I saw they were
actually reflecting in it. And for that one moment, that one image I asked them, “Would you guys just kiss for this one picture?” And then I came back
to my studio in New York, and I hand-glued these 250 images together and stood back and went,
“Wow, this is so cool! I’m changing time in a photograph.” And that concept actually
stayed with me for 13 years until technology finally
has caught up to my dreams. This is an image I created
of the Santa Monica Pier, Day to Night. And I’m going to show you a little video that gives you an idea of what
it’s like being with me when I do these pictures. To start with, you have to understand
that to get views like this, most of my time is spent up high,
and I’m usually in a cherry picker or a crane. So this is a typical day,
12-18 hours, non-stop capturing the entire day unfold. One of the things that’s great
is I love to people-watch. And trust me when I tell you, this is the greatest seat
in the house to have. But this is really how I go about
creating these photographs. So once I decide on my view
and the location, I have to decide where day begins
and night ends. And that’s what I call the time vector. Einstein described time as a fabric. Think of the surface of a trampoline: it warps and stretches with gravity. I see time as a fabric as well, except I take that fabric and flatten it,
compress it into single plane. One of the unique aspects
of this work is also, if you look at all my pictures, the time vector changes: sometimes I’ll go left to right, sometimes front to back,
up or down, even diagonally. I am exploring the space-time continuum within a two-dimensional still photograph. Now when I do these pictures, it’s literally like a real-time puzzle
going on in my mind. I build a photograph based on time, and this is what I call the master plate. This can take us several
months to complete. The fun thing about this work is I have absolutely zero control
when I get up there on any given day and capture photographs. So I never know who’s
going to be in the picture, if it’s going to be a great
sunrise or sunset — no control. It’s at the end of the process, if I’ve had a really great day
and everything remained the same, that I then decide who’s in and who’s out, and it’s all based on time. I’ll take those best moments that I pick
over a month of editing and they get seamlessly blended
into the master plate. I’m compressing the day and night as I saw it, creating a unique harmony between
these two very discordant worlds. Painting has always been a really
important influence in all my work and I’ve always been a huge fan
of Albert Bierstadt, the great Hudson River School painter. He inspired a recent series
that I did on the National Parks. This is Bierstadt’s Yosemite Valley. So this is the photograph
I created of Yosemite. This is actually the cover story
of the 2016 January issue of National Geographic. I photographed for over
30 hours in this picture. I was literally on the side of a cliff, capturing the stars
and the moonlight as it transitions, the moonlight lighting El Capitan. And I also captured this transition
of time throughout the landscape. The best part is obviously seeing
the magical moments of humanity as time changed — from day into night. And on a personal note, I actually had a photocopy
of Bierstadt’s painting in my pocket. And when that sun started
to rise in the valley, I started to literally shake
with excitement because I looked at the painting and I go, “Oh my god, I’m getting Bierstadt’s
exact same lighting 100 years earlier.” Day to Night is about all the things, it’s like a compilation of all
the things I love about the medium of photography. It’s about landscape, it’s about street photography, it’s about color, it’s about architecture, perspective, scale —
and, especially, history. This is one of the most historical moments I’ve been able to photograph, the 2013 Presidential Inauguration
of Barack Obama. And if you look closely in this picture, you can actually see time changing in those large television sets. You can see Michelle
waiting with the children, the president now greets the crowd, he takes his oath, and now he’s speaking to the people. There’s so many challenging aspects
when I create photographs like this. For this particular photograph, I was in a 50-foot scissor lift
up in the air and it was not very stable. So every time my assistant and I
shifted our weight, our horizon line shifted. So for every picture you see, and there were about
1,800 in this picture, we both had to tape our feet into position every time I clicked the shutter. (Applause) I’ve learned so many extraordinary
things doing this work. I think the two most important
are patience and the power of observation. When you photograph a city
like New York from above, I discovered that those people in cars that I sort of live with everyday, they don’t look like people
in cars anymore. They feel like a giant school of fish, it was a form of emergent behavior. And when people describe
the energy of New York, I think this photograph begins
to really capture that. When you look closer in my work, you can see there’s stories going on. You realize that Times Square is a canyon, it’s shadow and it’s sunlight. So I decided, in this photograph,
I would checkerboard time. So wherever the shadows are, it’s night and wherever the sun is,
it’s actually day. Time is this extraordinary thing that we never can really
wrap our heads around. But in a very unique and special way, I believe these photographs
begin to put a face on time. They embody a new
metaphysical visual reality. When you spend 15 hours
looking at a place, you’re going to see things
a little differently than if you or I walked up
with our camera, took a picture, and then walked away. This was a perfect example. I call it “Sacré-Coeur Selfie.” I watched over 15 hours all these people
not even look at Sacré-Coeur. They were more interested
in using it as a backdrop. They would walk up, take a picture, and then walk away. And I found this to be an absolutely
extraordinary example, a powerful disconnect between
what we think the human experience is versus what the human experience
is evolving into. The act of sharing has suddenly
become more important than the experience itself. (Applause) And finally, my most recent image, which has such a special meaning
for me personally: this is the Serengeti National
Park in Tanzania. And this is photographed
in the middle of the Seronera, this is not a reserve. I went specifically during
the peak migration to hopefully capture
the most diverse range of animals. Unfortunately, when we got there, there was a drought going on
during the peak migration, a five-week drought. So all the animals
were drawn to the water. I found this one watering hole, and felt if everything remained
the same way it was behaving, I had a real opportunity
to capture something unique. We spent three days studying it, and nothing could have prepared me for what I witnessed during our shoot day. I photographed for 26 hours in a sealed crocodile blind,
18 feet in the air. What I witnessed was unimaginable. Frankly, it was Biblical. We saw, for 26 hours, all these competitive species
share a single resource called water. The same resource that humanity
is supposed to have wars over during the next 50 years. The animals never even
grunted at each other. They seem to understand something
that we humans don’t. That this precious resource called water is something we all have to share. When I created this picture, I realized that Day to Night
is really a new way of seeing, compressing time, exploring the space-time continuum
within a photograph. As technology evolves
along with photography, photographs will not only communicate
a deeper meaning of time and memory, but they will compose a new narrative
of untold stories, creating a timeless window into our world. Thank you. (Applause)

100 thoughts on “The passing of time, caught in a single photo | Stephen Wilkes

  • June 28, 2016 at 2:45 pm
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    These are really nice images, but this guy is really full of himself…

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  • June 28, 2016 at 2:52 pm
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    I didn't know George Clooney did photography

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  • June 28, 2016 at 3:28 pm
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    Interesting but I prefer the Gregory Crewdson type of large scale photography. I like the watering hole picture even though it's more like a painting.

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  • June 28, 2016 at 3:55 pm
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    George Clooney? Is that you?

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  • June 28, 2016 at 4:03 pm
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    Absolutely amazing and what a great speaker. He seems a sensitive soul.

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  • June 28, 2016 at 4:14 pm
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    very neat but the guy might be taking himself too seriously

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  • June 28, 2016 at 4:24 pm
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    So photoshop? Dude is way to pretentious

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  • June 28, 2016 at 6:09 pm
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    It's unreal and so it feels unbelievable.

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  • June 28, 2016 at 6:10 pm
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    Thank you so much!

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  • June 28, 2016 at 6:15 pm
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    Looks like a 10 year olds school project, even the photo blending is a bit rubbish when you zoom in

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  • June 28, 2016 at 6:45 pm
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    "The act of sharing has suddenly become more important than the experience itself"

    This sentence perfeclt embodies the major problem I have with society today

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  • June 28, 2016 at 6:45 pm
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    Van Gogh did a day/night thing before it was cool.

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  • June 28, 2016 at 6:52 pm
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    pretty cool

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  • June 28, 2016 at 10:21 pm
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    "Great photos, but he so pretentious…He needs to get over himself"

    Yeah, how dare he believe in something different from everyone else's beliefs, and he has the audacity to speak about those beliefs with such conviction… gasp… Lol, your whole view on the video is ruined just because he talks about the schools of thought that have shaped him into what he is today?? That is assuming he is a Christian and a fan of Albert Einstein's work..

    Maybe y'all should embrace the differences of this life that make life so wonderful..

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  • June 28, 2016 at 10:48 pm
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    Kinda reminds me of Ted Mosby

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  • June 29, 2016 at 12:20 am
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    Watch this with the sound off

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  • June 29, 2016 at 12:57 am
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    This guy loves the smell of this own farts.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 5:14 am
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    from the comments, i feel like most people are missing the point

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  • June 29, 2016 at 6:50 am
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    Most people will just like it because its a TED Talk, but for me these photos are pointless, all these moments are special because you are just there "existing". Most of the time you're not even aware of your surroundings. This guy is just a hardcore photoshop fan. Maybe the only remarkable thing is that reminds us how fast our environment changes, that's it. To the host: you're wasting your life through the lenses of your cameras. You go outside there and enjoy every single moment, because it's unique.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 7:06 am
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    it's kind of cool, and if he'd explored the science of how it's done, or the implications in each picture I'd understand why it's here, but as-it-is it comes across as a sales pitch. Honestly, I'm not sure this is the sort of thing Ted talks should cover.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 11:48 am
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    looks stupid

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  • June 29, 2016 at 12:19 pm
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    time?einstein?gtr?wtf

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  • June 29, 2016 at 1:27 pm
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    Nice idea, but not really such a big deal.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 1:46 pm
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    I once wanted to test the long exposure on my new camera so I put it on the bench in front of some building at night and that changed my life in a way that I could never imagine. I figured that even though the passing of time and the time itself depends on the speed of the observer relative to the object, the picture itself happened to be of a poor quality because it was a cheap camera. Thank you.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 2:00 pm
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    I kinda like his more hands on approach with real photographs and gluing them together more, he should do more of that.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 2:36 pm
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    I bet this guy will be very sad when somebody will create an app for that.

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  • June 29, 2016 at 3:00 pm
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    stop using "I"…..this the most unimpressive ted talk ever!

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  • June 29, 2016 at 3:53 pm
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    man he is unbelievable 😲😲😲

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  • June 29, 2016 at 4:04 pm
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    Precious pictures…. He's so cool

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  • June 29, 2016 at 5:36 pm
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    act of sharing has become more important than the experience itself ,, well said ..

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  • June 29, 2016 at 9:17 pm
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    ارجوا الترجمه للغه العربيه

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  • June 30, 2016 at 12:38 am
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    His prints cost $50000!!! So much for "sharing"…

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  • June 30, 2016 at 1:02 am
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    Not my taste at all, I find it really hokey.
    So contrived and saccharine! 😛
    Not to be critical, but it's just……visually they give me the hebejebes. hahaha

    But I do love the story about the animals sharing the water.

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  • June 30, 2016 at 2:14 am
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    I've been a follower and fan of Wilkes for a little over a year. His passion for history and humanity mirrors my own and makes me love him even more!

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  • June 30, 2016 at 3:39 am
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    I have seen national geographic specials where animals kill each other around the watering hole, they don't seem to understand that they should be sharing the water. This presenter must have seen some far more enlightened animals than the ones I saw. Regardless, those pictures are really cool.

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  • June 30, 2016 at 4:49 am
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    Wow… he's really, really fond of his thing. I get it that it looks really interesting and all, but I don't believe you can call it something that "changes the way we look at time". The way he also continuosly focuses the attention to him as the center of it all is quite bothering. I know you came up with the idea and it takes a lot of work, but there seems to be a contradiction between the way he tells that this is a window into reallity in a new way; and his insistence on HIM as the CREATOR of the image (yes, he makes it from all the material he collects, but he's ultimately documenting something he's not creating).

    Interesting topic and process, but I don't think he's a cool guy to work with.

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  • June 30, 2016 at 1:49 pm
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    怎么就没个中国人评论呢

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  • June 30, 2016 at 3:17 pm
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    2:40 that how I feel about duct tape in FO4

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  • June 30, 2016 at 4:54 pm
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    My dream is to make this possible for the city I currently reside in. Thank you for reaffirming the ability is there to turn the dream into reality.

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  • July 1, 2016 at 1:32 am
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    _Sharing ?_These peoples taking selfies not even looking at the beautiful piece of architecture they have behind them aren't sharing anything but their exacerbated ego, the people they're "sharing" with are just there to make them feel a certain way about being wherever they are taking the selfie at. Look at ME, I'M in paris. Taking a photograph has now become about the social high people can get from making them seen by as many as possible. It used to be about trying to capture and save for later some of that great experience you're having right now, for you and your family and friends, now for these peopld it has become about making other people believe you're having a great experience to boost your ego. When I see these people who don't even see the beauty in the things they use as backdrops, I thank God I'm not one of them. And also I pop a couple anti nausea pills because they make me feel ill about sharing so much genetic material with them.

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  • July 1, 2016 at 2:59 am
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    I thought this was going to be about some long-term exposure trick that captures the same location over the years. But instead this is something a mediocre photographer can do with photoshop and a timelapse. Still great photography though.

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  • July 1, 2016 at 5:36 am
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    Don't mind the "I's" and "Me's". He just chose first person for his script………
    …..What I do mind is ……"El Capitan",,,is Not pronounced, el- cap-i-tahn……..If you want to keep it's Spanish origin, fucking say "El-Cah-pee-tahn". Say it correctly…..Or Americanize it……"El- cap-ee-tan"….Not this pretentious nod to ethnicity.

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  • July 1, 2016 at 5:39 am
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    That last picture is a amazing! Especially in a time like this, I think if we are to survive we need to learn to share! I've always given what I could but the majority in this world have a fear of doing the same.

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  • July 1, 2016 at 6:23 am
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    "exploring space time continuum (4D) with a 2D still photography" – you better be my physics prof so I can take photo all day

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  • July 1, 2016 at 7:45 am
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    Hey there !! jump It looks for me like really wonderfzl %give .

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  • July 1, 2016 at 8:57 am
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    "I am exploring the spacetime continuum within a two dimensional still photograph".
    Don't get me wrong, the photos are great. But come on.

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  • July 1, 2016 at 9:59 am
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    Beautiful Work!! Very Inspiring!!!

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  • July 1, 2016 at 1:41 pm
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    amazing, magical photos .. great marriage between technology and concept and message to humanity

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  • July 1, 2016 at 7:34 pm
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    One of my best TED videos ever..

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  • July 1, 2016 at 10:07 pm
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    i mean its just well times photographs on a still tripod and some photoshop…

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  • July 2, 2016 at 7:56 pm
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    he sounds like james franco

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  • July 2, 2016 at 8:28 pm
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    how did he go to the bathroom when he was in the cherry picker?…

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  • July 2, 2016 at 10:04 pm
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    I love how much the Dunning Kruger effect is demonstrated in the ignorant comments on almost every TED video, in one way or another, but on some the evidence is just a goldmine of data…somebody compile this and we'll have an excellent chart for improving our education systems both public and private no doubt

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  • July 3, 2016 at 3:23 am
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    The comment section is a demonstration of how very put off people are by the excessive use of "I"s and "me"s. This could be a TED talk in itself.

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  • July 3, 2016 at 4:23 am
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    I lasted 2:44 before I had to stop the video. Please tell me there wasn't a flashing 1-800 number on the screen as he was wrapping it up.

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  • July 3, 2016 at 8:06 am
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    Damn dude, tough crowd.

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  • July 3, 2016 at 1:12 pm
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    Not prone to calling things pretentious, but yeah…

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  • July 3, 2016 at 3:44 pm
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    Really horrid images in my opinion

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  • July 3, 2016 at 7:00 pm
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    Holy it look nice 😀

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  • July 4, 2016 at 1:04 am
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    lol the "time vector"

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  • July 4, 2016 at 1:46 am
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    Wow, amazing! <3

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  • July 5, 2016 at 11:52 pm
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    why there is no translation in Arabic? ?

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  • July 7, 2016 at 3:07 am
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    "The act of sharing has suddenly become more important than the experience itself"

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  • July 8, 2016 at 7:46 pm
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    I think that it was very fitting for the Inception billboard in the Time Square picture

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  • July 16, 2016 at 9:53 pm
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    Cheesy and gimmicky. Day to night looks so stupid and fake, almost in the same league as HDR. It does not capture the moment. How much time did they spend on photoshop?

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  • July 19, 2016 at 1:17 am
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    Painters did this for hundreds of years.

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  • July 19, 2016 at 10:26 pm
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    Very nice photos. Not exactly life altering but at least he's passionate.

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  • July 25, 2016 at 1:43 am
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    Pretentious much?

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  • July 25, 2016 at 8:28 pm
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    It's the really great job! Fantastic!

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  • August 4, 2016 at 3:52 am
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    amazing

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  • August 5, 2016 at 6:11 am
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    nice

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  • August 9, 2016 at 11:50 am
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    This was so inspiring!!

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  • August 12, 2016 at 1:49 am
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    pretentious indeed

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  • August 21, 2016 at 4:37 am
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    amazing. love the way the photographs look

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  • August 26, 2016 at 8:00 pm
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    DON'T JUDGE HIM IDJITS!!! what i don't understand is why people are hating this person? Yes he is mentioning himself alot but that is because why would someone not mention that this amazing work is done by themself..plus the people who are saying that he's being egoistic should know that alot of people are like that one way or another and not all people can be saint-ish. Also this is not a simple photoshop.If your saying that "oh he just simply photoshoped all the pics together" then know this that simple photoshop can NOT blend into one another.And from ehat he is telling,he had to be there at the SAME place for more than 8 hours..most of you can even stand for more than an hour or so unless it's at a place ehich has sale or somewhere where you can eat.. SO DONT JUDGE..

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  • September 10, 2016 at 3:22 am
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    This was beautiful.

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  • October 19, 2016 at 1:08 pm
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    Loved the last part about animals!

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  • December 2, 2016 at 5:07 pm
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    Pretty nice pictures, but that's just pretentious. Capturing the space-time continuum in a 2d plain? come on. It's just a transition from day to night, nothing more, nothing less. When you have to shove all these artists and for some reason Einstein in my face and compare yourself to all of them, you're just a pretentious narcissist.

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  • December 27, 2016 at 5:58 am
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    OK, slightly interesting – the merging of a couple of shots at different times of the day isn't that exciting.

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  • January 9, 2017 at 11:58 pm
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    Nice idea, but didn't like the result of the photos, looks like you cut and paste all the figures in the photo on photoshop…

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  • April 6, 2017 at 7:06 pm
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    creo que mas que nada el estar el aqui y ahora es de lo que trata pasan muchas cosas a nuestro alrededor y no lo notamos estamos en nuestra burbuja personal y nos perdemos de cosas creo que su idea es buena la edición de la fotografía es genial quisiera tener algo por lo cual me apasione como el…

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  • May 2, 2017 at 10:07 am
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    great work!

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  • December 20, 2017 at 4:41 am
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    What a beautiful piece of art ! It took so much efforts to create this art. And all I can see in the comments that people are critisizing him for how he is boasting about it . C'mon. Be a sport and appreciate his work . Finding Negativity in everything is the easiest thing

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  • February 10, 2018 at 2:01 pm
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    I don't understand why everybody got annoyed by this presentation… It's quite normal to quote famous sources in these cases

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  • March 1, 2018 at 5:23 pm
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    We did a comparison of deflicker software on a day to night timelapse. Hope you like it https://youtu.be/YxvMeGNPnqI

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  • April 7, 2018 at 6:58 pm
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    He stole the “4th dimension is time” thing from a classic book called the time machine. Lol. Gives no credit at all

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  • April 25, 2018 at 6:53 am
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    Oh good a presentation on Narcissism

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  • May 17, 2018 at 3:00 am
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    It’s like HDR on crack

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  • May 22, 2018 at 12:33 pm
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    Thank You Stephen Wilkes … for being a, " … relentless collector of magical moments." Beautiful! Love & Peace to All

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  • September 8, 2018 at 11:15 pm
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    Amazing Photos and Philosophy!! I'm Really stunning at last photo

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  • October 25, 2018 at 6:03 pm
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    The Ego has landed

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  • November 27, 2018 at 10:07 am
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    The wormhole picture gave me ebola. Yeah man, your photoshop collage is a wormhole, alright.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 9:53 pm
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    This is a load of barnaclesssss

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  • May 1, 2019 at 10:49 am
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    Some photographers are like DJs. I guess you know what I mean.

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  • May 8, 2019 at 7:05 am
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    The applauses are odd…was this cut?

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  • September 7, 2019 at 12:42 am
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    Pretentious.

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  • September 7, 2019 at 11:05 am
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    As a photographer and nowhere near this level it's such an inspiration to see such amazing work and things I never would have thought of 😀

    Reply

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