The Inverse Square Law for Photographers. A visual approach to the Inverse Square Law of Light

The Inverse Square Law for Photographers.  A visual approach to the Inverse Square Law of Light


The Inverse Square Law. Yes – it’s one of
those phrases that strikes fear into the minds of new and even experienced photographers.
Why? Because we are talking about physics – it’s an equation – you know – math? In this
video I am gonna do my best to simplify this Inverse Square Law stuff for you. Stay tuned. Hey gang! My name is Joe Edelman and my mission
is to help photographers like YOU to develop a solid understanding of the HOWS & WHYS behind
great photography so that you can achieve your goals as a photographer. There are tons of videos about the inverse
square law and they all start out with the MATH – even though most of them admit that
you really don’t need to know the math. If you’ve watched many of my videos you frequently
hear me talk about not using four letter words! AUTO – RULE – POSE – FILM…. well MATH is
a four letter word so DON’T use it! For all you numbers geeks – if you want to know
the equation and the exact math behind the Inverse Square Law, I don’t want to waste
your time – you’re not going to find it here – there is this thing called Google – go check
it out. For those of you that want to gain a practical understanding of the Inverse Square
Law and WHY it is such a big deal – follow along… There are two pieces of physics that every
photographer MUST learn if they want to be able to consistently create great photos.
One is Depth of field – I’ll save that for another video and the other is The Inverse
Square Law. The inverse square law is about how fast light
falls off and how far it spreads as the distance from the light source increases. Light intensity or brightness drops much faster
– closer to the source than it does further away from the source. It also means that the
closer your subject is to your light source – the harsher the shadows and the quicker
the light will dissipate. The further your subject is from the light source the dimmer
the light will be, but the shadows will be softer and the light will spread over a larger
area. Take a look at my lineup of eggs… (1) The
eggs are set 6 inches apart and at f/22 the first egg is properly exposed. Pay close attention
because this is where most people start to mis-understand the Inverse Square Law. (2)
In order to get the proper exposure for the second egg – we need to shoot at f/11. That’s
not one stop – but two stops difference. (3) You see each time you double the distance
of the subject from the flash – the light falls off by four times – not two times. Uh-oh, I see a lot of you scratching your
heads. Don’t give up yet – The Inverse Square Law really is your friend – it is a very powerful
tool – as long as you understand how it works. Let’s look at an even easier but more useful
example… (4) Here you see a portrait subject seated
3 feet in front of a neutral gray background. The light is a medium sized softbox placed
three feet in front of the subject and my aperture is f/16. In the finished image you
see a darker gray background and well defined shadows on her face. You also see large catchlights
on the camera left side of the eyes. Notice also that the catchlights are in the upper
half of the eyes – where they should be. To achieve this I have the softbox placed with
2/3rds of it above the face and only one third below – since I still want the light to have
a natural top down effect. (5) So let’s move that light back – to 6
feet – which is double the distance of the three feet example. Now my aperture changes
to f/8. I have doubled the distance of the subject to the light and as a result I have
just 1/4 of the amount of light which is a two full stop difference. You should also
note that the background appears a little lighter and the shadows are softer and the
catchlights are smaller. Remember this is the same medium sized softbox with the same
power settings on the flash – just at double the distance. (6) Let’s double it again. This time I am
going to move that softbox back to 12 feet. Remember – I started at three feet – doubled
it to 6 and now I have doubled again to 12. Now my aperture changes to f/4 because I have
only 1/6th of the light that I started with. You can see that the shadows are even softer
yet. The gray background is even lighter and the catchlights are even smaller. (7) Let’s compare all three. The first image
on the left – 3ft at f/16. The middle image – 6ft at f/8 and the image on the right – 12
feet at f/4. You can see as the light moves further from the subject – the shadows soften,
the background gets brighter and the catchlights get smaller. The flash is set at the same
power for all three shots and the softbox is set at exactly the same height for all
three. So does that help? Remember this tip: – Light
Close for sharper shadows, bigger catchlights and darker backgrounds. Light Far for softer
shadows, smaller catchlights and brighter backgrounds. That’s just one way that the inverse square
law impacts your lighting. Let’s look at another scenario… (8) In this setting I have two models that
are 3 feet and 4 and a half feet from the light source. You can see the model on the
left is much brighter than the model on the right. If I move the two models to 6 feet
and 7.5 feet you can tell the model on the left is still a bit brighter than the one
on the right but definitely not by as much in the first example. In this version if I
move them to 12 feet and 13.5 feet from the light source you can see that they are virtually
the same brightness. (9) If we look at the close-ups. The first
version – close to the light source – the model on the left is much brighter. The middle
distance the models are closer in brightness. And in the final frame the models are virtually
the same brightness. You can see that each time I double the distance
I loose two full stops of light. I promise you – it is more important to remember visually
what you see happening here – then it is to remember how many stops of light you loose
at what distance – that’s why we have light meters – so that you don’t have to do the
math! Another tip: – photographing two or more people
– back your lights up to keep your subjects evenly lit. Now that you have seen three different scenarios
and how the inverse square law impacted them… let’s look at a very common mistake that
new and young photographers make while they are learning the ins and outs of lighting. Unfortunately I see this mistake frequently
in images posted in my Facebook group and that is a photographer putting their light
source or modifier too close to their subject. (10) When you do that you wind up with a situation
like this where the top of the subjects face is brighter than the bottom. (11) Or one like
this where the subjects hand is brighter than her face which causes the hand to be a distraction. Since we understand how the inverse square
law works now – we know that we can back the beauty dish away from the subject and get
a more even light. (11a) Likewise if we back up the soft box and raise it slightly – we
get the same skin tone and brightness on the subjects hand and face. I find photographers making a similar mistake
with models standing too close to a light source. (12) It is fine if their arms and
hands are at their sides – but if they move part of their body closer to the light – you
wind up with a very bright hand. If we simply back up the light source we can even out the
light so that the hand and the face are of equal brightness. Are you getting the hang of this yet? Please
notice that I haven’t made you listen to all that M A T H stuff. The reality is that
there is nothing wrong with knowing all the physics behind the Inverse Square Law – but
what is more important is understanding how it works and practicing so that you learn
to recognize these challenges and how to use the Inverse Square Law to overcome them. Let’s look at one more aspect of the Inverse
Square Law that I haven’t discussed yet…. In addition to the intensity of the light
diminishing rapidly – the light spreads as it gets further from the source. You can see
in this diagram that at distance of 3 feet, my light source is covering 9 square feet
and my subject is properly exposed. Now we learned with the eggs earlier in the video
that if we double the distance to 6 feet we will have one quarter or 25% of the light
intensity – but look at what happens to the spread – now the light covers four times the
area or 36 square feet. If we move three more feet to 9 feet we now have just 11.11 percent
of the light intensity but we cover an area that is 81 square feet. (13)Take a look at this group shot that is
lit with two shoot through umbrellas and speedlights – one on either side and fairly close to the
group. The lighting on the group is not even as the people on the outsides are somewhat
brighter than the people in the middle. If we back the lights up now the group is evenly
lit from side to side and front to back and the crazy shadows on the wall almost completely
eliminated. So the simple math is that if you need to
cover a bigger area – back that light up. Now I know that some of you are thinking what
about the modifiers? The modifier doesn’t really impact the Inverse Square Law- it impacts
the shape and softness or even the intensity of the light but the light coming out of a
softbox will still spread as it gets further from the source. This applies to beauty dishes,
umbrellas, octoboxes, parabolic reflectors and even snoots. (14) If you have been paying close attention
you should have noticed that you can also use the Inverse Square Law to change the tone
and brightness of your background. Let’s go back to this set-up with the beauty
dish and a reflector. With my subject three feet in front of a gray background and the
dish about two feet in front of my subject – we get this medium to dark gray rendition
of the background. If we double that distance the background gets even darker yet. And if
we move the subject and the light even further from the background we get a nearly black
background that still provides a little separation. All of this with one light and a reflector. Needless to say I could go on for hours with
variations. Just understand that if you want to be able to consistently produce well lit
images using studio strobes or speedlights or LED lights – you can’t ignore the Inverse
Square Law – the sooner you embrace it and work to understand it – the better your lighting
will be. The simple tips: Light Close for sharper shadows, bigger catchlights
and darker backgrounds. Light Far for softer shadows, smaller catchlights and brighter
backgrounds. If you are photographing two more people – back
your lights up to keep your subjects evenly lit. If you need to cover a bigger area – back
that light up. So there you have it. The Inverse Square Law.
Just so you know what you missed by not talking about the MATH…. here is the equation. Ok
– now that you’ve seen – forget it. Go set up some lights and practice! I hope you find this helpful. Please hit that
thumbs up and subscribe so that you don’t miss any videos and until next time go pick
up that camera and shoot something because your BEST shot – it’s your NEXT shot, so keep
learning, keep thinking, keep shooting. Adios!

100 thoughts on “The Inverse Square Law for Photographers. A visual approach to the Inverse Square Law of Light

  • July 1, 2017 at 4:29 am
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    Awesome as always! I love the way you simplified it with real world examples instead of just illustrations.

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  • July 2, 2017 at 2:22 am
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    This is so useful and easy to understand! Thanks for sharing Joe

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  • July 2, 2017 at 2:44 am
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    I really liked your summarized tips: Light CLOSE for sharper shadows, bigger catch-lights and darker backgrounds. Light FAR for softer shadows, smaller catch-lights and brighter backgrounds. When lighting two or more people or need to cover a bigger area – back the lights up.

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  • July 2, 2017 at 3:52 am
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    I take it instead of changing aperture you can also change ISO and/or shutter speed to correct the exposure? Surely using a wider aperture for group photos especially will cause people to be out of focus?

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  • July 2, 2017 at 9:08 am
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    Amazing TUT. Tks u.

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  • July 2, 2017 at 9:27 am
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    Hello, Please help me understand: if light far imply softer shadows, why the sun give us harsh shadow?

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  • July 2, 2017 at 2:46 pm
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    Credit where it's due, this is hands down the very best video that I have ever seen on learning the basic concept and practical implications of the inverse square law.

    If this video gets what it deserves we will look up one day to see 500,000 views and thousands of likes (or more) as there really isn't a better one out there anywhere. Congratulations on tackling such a potentially confusing subject matter and somehow nailing it perfectly.

    Reply
  • July 2, 2017 at 3:01 pm
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    Great, except you contradicted yourself. "Light close for dark backgrounds", but in the final synopsis, you repeatedly said the background got darker as you moved the light away…..

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  • July 2, 2017 at 3:19 pm
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    very informative! 🙂

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  • July 2, 2017 at 4:26 pm
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    holy, this video provided me an epiphany. Up to this point i have always placed my lightsource/octobox nice and close to my subject, but never really considered it until this video. i just always thought the bigger the light source, the softer the light. this was an education. thank you 🙂

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  • July 2, 2017 at 8:27 pm
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    Awesome video Joe! You really explained it well! I do struggle with how to reconcile the fact that SOFT light (with gentle transitions from light to shadow) generally is achieved using LARGE light sources that are positioned CLOSE to the subject. The inverse square law seems to indicate otherwise, encouraging a photographer to mover FURTHER from the subject for even, soft light. Can you shed some light here, Joe?? Thanks again!!

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  • July 3, 2017 at 1:53 am
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    Nice video Joe. Keep up the great work.

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  • July 3, 2017 at 6:50 am
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    I have watched a lot of videos about inverse square law but yours is the best!
    Great explanation from great photographer
    Thank you

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  • July 3, 2017 at 5:45 pm
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    Thank you so much for doing this, Joe. You've just made all the other videos on the subject obsolete. So well thought out and presented. I continue to learn so much from you.

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  • July 3, 2017 at 7:12 pm
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    Just one thing to say, excellent tutorial!!

    Reply
  • July 4, 2017 at 2:19 am
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    Excellent explanation and useful tips for photographers. Thanks Joe.
    Raymond Elias

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  • July 4, 2017 at 9:10 am
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    By far the best explanation of this i've seen. I've learned so much in this one video, thanks a bunch Joe!

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  • July 4, 2017 at 7:54 pm
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    Great explanation as always Joe. A picture, as always is worth a thousand words! – anyone out there wanna buy a calculator???

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  • July 4, 2017 at 9:23 pm
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    MASSIVE RESPECT as ALWAYS.

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  • July 6, 2017 at 8:54 am
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    Thanks Joe!

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  • July 6, 2017 at 9:47 am
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    I'm still a bit confused! I thougt that that the relative size of the light source determined the softness/hardness of the light. And by moving the light source closer you make it relativily larger and producent a softer light?

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  • July 6, 2017 at 11:09 am
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    The descriptions about shadows being sharper when the light is closer to the subject and vise versa is ABSOLUTELY incorrect!

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  • July 6, 2017 at 12:02 pm
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    Great video, the 3d models really helped. It all made sense except I had always been told a larger modifier would produce softer light and that being closer to the subject made a modifier bigger. I had thought that would result in softer light on the subject. this seems to show the opposite.

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  • July 9, 2017 at 4:35 am
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    Simple and informative. Thanks Joe.

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  • July 9, 2017 at 1:18 pm
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    I love your videos and I learning a lot. Thank you Joe!

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  • July 9, 2017 at 5:42 pm
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    thank you Joe.. tried experimenting with these concepts you've explained. I was able to predict the result based on the information you've given in this video. I'm sure I'll be able to understand it better as I keep practicing with lights..

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  • July 9, 2017 at 10:54 pm
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    hi Joe, thats a great and easy way to understand the inverse square law and i am applying it on my photography thanks 2u. All the best Joe.

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  • July 10, 2017 at 8:12 am
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    G'day & Thank you Joe for going to so much trouble with not only your words but also the graphics. You have made this so easy to understand, like all your videos.
    Hooroo,
    Brendan from Australia.

    Reply
  • July 11, 2017 at 6:04 pm
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    Great video, simple and  straight to the point.

    Reply
  • July 12, 2017 at 5:30 am
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    You're the best Joe!

    Reply
  • July 12, 2017 at 8:00 pm
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    Fantastic. Thanks so much; your teaching is clear, precise, accurate, and concise.

    Reply
  • July 15, 2017 at 4:27 pm
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    You can also feather the light

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  • July 18, 2017 at 5:37 pm
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    Thank you for the awesome explanation Joe 🙂

    Reply
  • July 27, 2017 at 4:31 pm
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    You are the best Joe!

    Reply
  • August 4, 2017 at 1:52 am
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    Thanks for simplifying this – makes sense.

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  • August 9, 2017 at 5:44 pm
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    Great video as always, but I don't see how 9:09 to 9:35 has anything to do with the inverse square law. Obviously the background will get darker if you move the light further away and keep it at the same power and the camera at the same settings.

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  • August 13, 2017 at 8:59 am
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    YOU the man! 😀🇬🇧👍

    Reply
  • August 26, 2017 at 2:50 am
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    What happened to the guy in the egg video from 6 years ago?

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  • August 30, 2017 at 12:32 pm
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    Till now I though you need the light close to get softer shadows because it becomes a larger light source. And if you move it back it becomes a smaller light source and hence harsher shadows. Am confused

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  • September 5, 2017 at 12:38 pm
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    awesome video Joe, very educational 🙂

    Reply
  • September 7, 2017 at 7:23 pm
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    You look so much different than you did 4 years ago! That YouTube money did you well

    Reply
  • September 13, 2017 at 2:26 pm
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    Thank you for simplifying the inverse square law, i am a visual learner and if you explain this just by talking with no visuals i would not fully understand it…..thank you for sharing your knowledge! Your videos and you will be a part of my journey in photography….thank you so much.

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  • September 21, 2017 at 4:10 pm
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    You are the One!

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  • September 26, 2017 at 9:56 pm
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    Большое спасибо за этот урок. Я думаю что многие фотограф с длительным опытом работы , совершают такие ошибки. Я очень благодарен тебе за твою работу! Еще раз большое спасибо, Удачи!

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  • October 7, 2017 at 7:25 am
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    Thank you very much for your explanation.

    Reply
  • October 9, 2017 at 7:50 am
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    Thanks a lot for this video!!! Before it, the inverse square law was really something I did not wanna touch. Now I can dive into it and stop have excuses 😁

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  • October 12, 2017 at 8:29 am
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    Thanks! that was helpful !

    Reply
  • October 17, 2017 at 6:04 pm
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    The lightbulb just went off in my head. Thank you!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  • October 30, 2017 at 10:40 pm
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    Great video. Awesome explanation. Thanks for posting and sharing. I am a subscriber now 👌👌👌

    Reply
  • October 31, 2017 at 3:48 pm
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    you don't know how gratefull I am for this, my best wishes and a beautiful life

    Reply
  • November 8, 2017 at 3:30 am
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    The confusing thing is – people always say to put a light closer to the subject for softer light.. and farther away for hard light.. but this law states that farther away makes the light softer. It almost seems like both are true…? So which is it? If I put an apple on a table, and point a flash light up close, the fall of will be quick … but if I move further away it should be softer…. but, why do people say to put a softbox as close to the subject as possible for softer light?

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  • December 7, 2017 at 3:36 am
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    Only I can say is Thank you

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  • December 11, 2017 at 1:06 am
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    Outstanding information.Thanks Joe

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  • December 20, 2017 at 7:38 pm
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    Now that was the best. Well done.

    Reply
  • December 30, 2017 at 1:03 am
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    I love listening to yor video, you have a way to explain complicated techniques and make it easy to understand :-). Good work and i'll continue watching more videos… May i ask what is the software you are using to explain in this vid ?

    Reply
  • December 31, 2017 at 11:15 pm
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    I don't mind the approach but that "math" is NOT rocket science… it's grade 5 level.

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  • January 2, 2018 at 4:57 am
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    Awesome! Inverse square law, as important as it is, both never made sense to me, & always intimidated me. This simple breakdown sure helped make my life easier, & took some of that headache away! BEST

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  • January 12, 2018 at 12:38 am
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    Thank you Joe

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  • January 13, 2018 at 9:25 pm
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    I think I've watched this video 3 times now in less than 2 months and every time I pick up a little something extra. It's totally transformed how I think about lighting shots in a studio. Definitely a must watch.

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  • January 15, 2018 at 2:44 am
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    Dude… Your transformation from 2010 to now is insane

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  • January 19, 2018 at 4:02 pm
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    Love it, you have a great way of explaining everything.

    Reply
  • January 28, 2018 at 6:25 am
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    The best video explaining the inverse square law for photography on YouTube. Thank you.

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  • January 30, 2018 at 8:33 am
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    With a portrait it is critical that you properly expose the brightest diffuse highlight, which is usually on the face. You then control the darkness of the shadows with the distance of the main light, feathering the main light, using a reflector, or using fill lighting.

    As you move a diffuse light closer to the subject it becomes relatively larger and the light becomes softer, which means the edges of the shadows become fuzzier. The amount of light fall off across the subject also becomes larger (the inverse square law in action). As the amount of fall of increases the ratio between the brightest diffuse highlight and the shadows increases, i.e. the shadows get darker vs the highlight. If you get too close the shadows become pure black without any details in the image when you properly expose for the diffuse highlight. This is when you break out the reflector or fill light.

    The light get harder as it becomes relatively smaller, which is what happens as it is moved away from the subject. What that means is that the edges of the shadows cast by the light become sharper. The Sun, which has a diameter of 864,938 miles (1.392 million km), is so far away from the much smaller Earth, 24,900 miles (40,070 km), that it appears to be relatively small so it casts sharp edged shadows.

    The light also becomes flatter with distance, which means that the difference in the amount of light light fall off, i.e. the amount of light on the near side of the subject vs the far side of the subject (or the background), becomes smaller. The sun, for example, is so far away at an average of 92,955,807 miles (149,597,870,700 meters), that you and a mountain 20 miles away are receiving identical amounts of light.

    Joe saying the shadows became softer as he backs his diffuse light away is confusing. What Joe should have said is that the difference in brightness between the near and far sides of the subject becomes smaller. The reason the light appeared to become softer and created fuzzy subject shadows on the background when Joe backed the light away from the subject was all the stray light bouncing off the ceiling and walls of his small studio.

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  • February 2, 2018 at 12:36 am
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    After several months of watching your videos, I've learned many things. As you said in your last live chat, you see yourself primarily as a teacher. I would add that in some ways, you are as much a philosophy teacher as a photography teacher. One of those philosophies seems to be: 

    Follow the laws but break the rules.

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  • February 4, 2018 at 9:39 am
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    Thank you so much, Joe. You're definitely one of the best professors ever at YouTube University.

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  • February 7, 2018 at 6:14 am
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    Hello Joe, loved your tuts. Is there any website wherein i can simulate lighting as shown in your video at 6:39?

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  • February 17, 2018 at 6:11 pm
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    I'm a beginner and I want to purchase inexpensive lighting equipment..would a soft box be ok to start practicing or which equipment do you recommend?

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  • February 20, 2018 at 8:02 pm
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    I need your advice please concerning the lighting, I want to shoot overhead camera tutorials, I want to eliminate shades to the max and with enough light, is it better to have 2 softboxes with 5 lamps ports on each one, or should I rather go for 3 softboxes with one lamp port each.
    Thank you so much, your videos and advices are of a big help ! 😀

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  • February 21, 2018 at 5:43 am
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    whoa Joe, you made this information so simple!!! thank you.

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  • February 22, 2018 at 6:44 pm
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    On this side of the pond math is a 5 letter word, as in maths!!!! lol

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  • March 17, 2018 at 5:05 pm
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    Your awesome brother…

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  • March 20, 2018 at 7:53 am
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    Your explanation of the inverse square law was very simple and easy to understand. Thank you. Sree Lakshmi from India

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  • April 3, 2018 at 2:04 am
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    Hi Joe, you are an amazing teacher. One thing I love that you always say, get out there and practice. It's so true… you can watch tutorial until the cows come home, but you gotta get out there and practice – then it finally, truly sinks in. Thanks for this tutorial Joe.

    Reply
  • April 5, 2018 at 5:33 am
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    a world of information. thank you

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  • April 6, 2018 at 6:39 am
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    can you please make a tutorial on what a "soft" light really means. some instructions say that if you want "softer" light you have to bring the light source closer.

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  • April 10, 2018 at 1:29 pm
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    Hi Sir, Thanks for the explanation. I love your videos, they helped me a lot as a beginner photographer. with that being said, I do have a question. I've heard some photographers said that the closer the light source the softer it is, the farther the light source the harsher the light becomes. Thats why sun light cast a very bright and harsh light because its a pin point light, and If can pull the sun closer, it would actually give a softer light. I'm really confused by that statement, as to me it sounds like its the exact opposite of inverse square law. Is that statement false? am i understanding this wrong? im really confuse. Thanks in advance Sir!

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  • April 26, 2018 at 10:25 am
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    Very practical tips and insights, thanks Joe!

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  • May 8, 2018 at 5:10 am
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    Hi Joe, This is the best tutorial of the inverse square law that I have seen, and I have seen a lot. Karl Taylor is good but he can learn a lot about teaching from you. The amazing thing about you is that your videos are on point and the viewer does not have to waste valuable time listening to rambling talk. Keep it up.

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  • May 13, 2018 at 8:51 pm
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    why is film a four letter word you shouldn't use?

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  • June 22, 2018 at 2:25 pm
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    Well done, with excellent simulations!

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  • June 24, 2018 at 6:21 pm
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    All your material is so great that there are no words to express how grateful am I…

    Reply
  • June 27, 2018 at 12:10 pm
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    best video about Inverse Square Law of Light

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  • July 4, 2018 at 11:37 pm
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    Mil gracias por las traducciones al español!!!!

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  • July 9, 2018 at 3:39 am
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    Thanks for refresher course on light.

    "Every time you double the distance you have to quadruple the power"

    I had a whole semester of physics just on light and only thing that I remember was how light travels thru wet T-shirts.

    I'm glad I found your channel and love your work, Professor Edelman!

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  • August 20, 2018 at 4:40 pm
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    Why haven't I watched this sooner….Joe, awesome videos as always….or maybe I did and just forgot :/

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  • October 3, 2018 at 11:32 pm
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    Muchas gracias Maestro !!!

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  • October 6, 2018 at 6:58 pm
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    So much to learn, was going to ask "can you make a video on rim lighting?" but now after watching this video, I am excieted to try it myself, if I fail consistently then will request you to make a video on rim lightning.

    Reply
  • December 29, 2018 at 11:33 pm
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    Oh wow! You have Spanish subtitles!. Impresionante. I will tell about your channel to friends that don’t have good enough english to just follow the talk. Thank you!

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  • January 8, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    quite simply the best explanations on YouTube for photography.

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  • January 18, 2019 at 1:28 pm
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    super helpful. thank you

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  • February 14, 2019 at 6:19 am
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    Funny I‘m engineer and understand the math well, but not the practical effect 😂 Thanks a lot!

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  • February 15, 2019 at 8:15 pm
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    Your channel and information that you provide as for starting, amateur photographer aspiring to be something more, priceless, thank you

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  • March 9, 2019 at 3:12 am
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    I LOVED LOVED LOVED YOUR VIDEO AND ALL OF THE THEM. FINALLY I UNDERSTOOD WELL HOW THIS LAW WORKS!!!!! THANX A LOT! YOU ARE AMAZING!!!!!

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  • March 18, 2019 at 1:16 am
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    Joe Great Video, Keep up the Great Work. Can't wait to see more of your Tutorials and Awesome Tips n Tricks

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  • March 30, 2019 at 10:01 am
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    Another great video Joe with an excellent, clear breakdown given in a practical manner which provides a solid base for us to work on. Thank you young man 👌

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  • April 9, 2019 at 12:14 pm
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    Thanks for making this fundamental knowledge so concrete for us to see! Finally knew what our teacher was trying to say all this time.

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  • June 11, 2019 at 4:56 am
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    Master…

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:47 pm
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    Muy bien explicado y siempre acompañando de los resultados, realmente me ha ayudado a entender mucho mejor. Te ganaste un humilde suscriptor. Gracias por compartir conocimiento.

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  • August 13, 2019 at 3:02 am
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    Love this video! What about what I have always been told? The smaller the light source the harder the light. The closer the light the softer the light due to the fact that the light source becomes larger compared to the subject because the light is closer?

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  • August 13, 2019 at 1:31 pm
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    You are a genius for inventing the inverse square law. JK. 🙂 But you area genius in explaining how it works. I just truly didn't understand it and really never considered the effect it has to your photograph. I have been struggling to create very dramatic portraits. The only thing I was missing was using the inverse square law. Right after watching this video and for the 10th time or so, I tried immediately by moving the model twice as far from the light and seeing the inverse square law in effect. I am so frigin excited! This control lets me create the dramatic portraits I've been struggling to create! Your teaching and some observations I made at the Click Con event/trade show have changed how I think about my portraits. I all so purchased, set.a.light 3D V2.. Inverse square law also works with continuous lighting. I am using an LED continuous Nanlite 300 Forza. This is my first continuous light and so far I am loving it! Thank you for your brilliance Joe!!! I am going to watch the video and practice this again until it is second nature to think like this. I would love to see you teaching at the next Click Con Event!!!!!

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