Reference Print Offer – How to get prints from me into your hands.

Reference Print Offer – How to get prints from me into your hands.


Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry. Please note the email address is wrong. The correct address is [email protected] – I misspelled photography when I set up this youtube channel (!). Sorry.

10 thoughts on “Reference Print Offer – How to get prints from me into your hands.

  • September 2, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    TimiWhat a great idea and generous offer of your time. I don't think I've ever seen a reference print before and I will certainly take you up on your offer. Your passion is contagious and since viewing your videos I have rebuilt a darkroom in my spare bedroom, purchased a 6×7 LPL enlarger and started shooting again on my Mamiya C330f. Thank you for lighting that fire again within me!

    Reply
  • September 8, 2017 at 1:44 am
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    Mr.  Hall are you still doing this offer?  I requested an order form but haven't heard back.  Wasn't sure if you had a cut off point for the number of offers you would take on. Thanks

    Reply
  • October 22, 2017 at 2:00 am
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    It is now the 22st of October and the offer of prints ended about 3 weeks ago. I’ve sent out a total of 12 packages to folks who responded; most were from overseas. Only 3 were from the US and one of the three (I know) is not a photographer or darkroom technician. He is a collector of sorts. So the interest in fine darkroom printing seems to be limited to about 3.5% of the subscribers that I’ve garnered over the last 18 months. I was very pleased to make the prints for these 12 viewers; the number was not too large or too small.
    There were 2 fine black and white prints supplied with each package – made onto fiber based paper selenium toned, and there were 2 other prints made (from the same negative), one without the aid of a mask and the other with a mask in place over the negative. I also included material that described how the negative was exposed, processed and analyzed with a densitometer and subsequently plotted onto graph paper. All the data was presented as clearly as possible.
    Along with the 4 prints I also sent a 21 Silver Step tablet (negative) of my own making. It was made to test onto darkroom print material and it has an overall density range of 1.65 – perfect that that material. I didn’t mention this as part of the package because I had a limited supply of step tablets and didn’t know if I would have enough to send out (in case too many people ordered the prints). Along with the step tablet was a contact print made onto black and white paper showing all 21 steps. I suggested that each person print their own contact prints using this step tablet.
    This tablet serves as a “standard” negative and it can be used to record any paper’s sensitivity and its own characteristics. Prints made from such a negative can be used to compare many things, from different papers to chemistry, toning, contrast variations, and even fading characteristics. It can also be used to help analyze color materials and ascertaining a starting point when printing color negatives. When used in conjunction with a densitometer a standard negative was an essential tool. An on easel meter was also a normal piece of equipment in the darkroom.
    I am concerned that basic darkroom techniques, which took decades to refine, such as the use of a standard negative, is no longer practiced or taught. The development of the craft of fine art printing in the darkroom is now in danger of becoming a lost art. I am contemplating developing a video lesson addressing this particular skill and the use of appropriate equipment.

    I am just now beginning to get some response from the prints that I sent out. Here is a sampling of what I’ve received:

    The prints arrived today. I am very pleased with them, fantastic quality!
    Thanks very much for providing this information,
    I am going to try to print using your method, in the very near future.

    The packaged arrived today intact. I was surprised, delighted and greatly appreciative for the signed large wet fabric print. The print looks absolutely amazing. I have my work cut out to return to you an equally amazing print. As requested in your correspondence, I will conduct all communications through the Youtube channel post. Time to get busy. Thanks again.

    Your mail arrived yesterday. Thank you very much indeed. It is very informative and goal setting for me.
    I am about to have all the equipment for masking and I am looking forward to start.
    I will show you my results as soon as there are some to be shown.

    Hi Tim, Meant to email you yesterday that they were received and the before/after masking example showed very well what you do (better than Ansel).

    Reply
  • October 29, 2017 at 6:02 pm
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    Just received a new comment from a student of film photography in Argentina… Here is his comment and my reply:

    Hi Timi
    The photograph of chair and fabric are marvelous. What paper do you use to make this copies??
    Best regards

    HI Gerardo –
    I used the Ilford Multigrade Fiber paper processed in Dektol diluted 1 part stock to 2 parts water. But it isn't the paper nor the chemistry that makes the difference. It is the combination of the local contrast (juxtaposing important tones next to one another) in order to highlight the feeling behind each print. This is enhanced by the masking technique that I am trying to teach.

    thanks,
    Tim

    Reply
  • November 2, 2017 at 4:37 pm
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    Tim – Just did my first "black mask" last night. I have a question to ask you. When you use Condit contact frame to produce masking, you registered camera negative with "emulsion down" first, and then you register mask film with "emulsion down". If I understand this correctly, "emulsion down" means the film emulsion faces to the lens.

    When you make fine prints, how do you registered with camera negative, "black masking" and highlight masking together in what order? How about all film's emulsion, face to lens (light source)?

    Is there anyway we need to register camera negative and mask film with emulsion to emulsion?

    Thanks

    Reply
  • November 3, 2017 at 1:27 pm
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    Tim – After I read your post, I know I made a mistake. My masks are too strong. I did not place a diffusion sheet between and I did not use mask film. I am going to find a diffusion sheet. To benefit other viewers, the film I used is this: see link
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/531571-Arista-Ortho-Litho-Film-3.0-5×7-100-Sheets
    I mask 4×5 camera negatives and I have to use 5×7 ortho film because my home made punch and pin registration system. See link how to make a registration system under $50.
    http://www.fallrivereditions.com/blog/pin-registration-board
    http://www.black-prints.com/how-to-get-the-perfect-registration-with-ternes-burton-pins/
    You can order the pin here:
    https://www.ternesburton.com/register-pins/
    If you have deep pockets, you can buy a whole system from $500 to $1000, links here:
    http://www.radekaphotography.com/carriers.htm
    http://www.alistairinglis.com/inglis-unsharp/

    By the way, Tim, do you have a registered negative carrier so you don't need to spend so much time to tape them together?

    Reply
  • November 5, 2017 at 1:54 am
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    New comment from Germany :
    Der Tim,

    I have received your prints. Thank you very much. I was positively surprised that you also added film with the different densities. I have bout myself a densitometer from Macbeth – a TD931. I hope it will do it´s purpose. It seems to be working. I still lack the understanding to use it to its full potential but I think I will get there once I have been through all your tutorials.

    Again, thank you very much for taking the effort to pass your knowledge.

    Kind regards

    My Response :
    HI Klause – I included the step tablet that I made because it can be used as a standard negative. A standard negative is something that is now-a-days seldom talked about, but it is very useful and a way of determining many variables in a fair and objective manner. The print that I made from this standard neg shows all 21 steps on a particular paper (Multigrade RC paper from Ilford). I believe I used 20 yellow in my enlarger in order to achieve these 21 steps. It is a low contrast adjustment (probably a grade #1) and it is most likely the lowest contrast setting that I would use for my own negatives. The density range of the step tablet is 1.65 and it represents the most usable range that paper will require. It is not easily made and so I didn't include it in my initial offering of prints. I don't have that many that I've made and I didn't want to offer something that I would run out of.
    When I get any new stock of paper I record the emulsion number and I make a contact print to obtain all 21 steps and I compare the settings used with the previous batch that I had on hand. This way I can ascertain how different the 2 emulsions are, even if they are from the same manufacturer. I can also see if the exposure needed is the same and if the contrasts between the 2 are the same and if the maximum black obtained is the same.
    I do this with all types of paper that I use. For example I just, this week, a roll of FOBA multi-contrast fiber based paper. It is from Eastern Europe and it took over 5 weeks to get to San Francisco. I just contact printed the paper this morning and whereas the Ilford Multi-contrast paper required 60 yellow, the Foba paper needed 10 yellow. The exposure of the Ilford required 15 seconds while the Foba paper needed only 7.5 seconds. This is with the same light level falling onto the easel (I used an on-easel meter to adjust the aperture to maintain a constant light level).
    I can then use my densitometer to see which paper produces a better black; I can see what filtration I need to adjust the contrasts of the 2 different papers; I can see how much change I get by toning; I can even place the prints in a window to determine how much fading each paper goes through given the same amount to time in the window. There is much that I can determine and it is a comparison of "Apples to Apples" so to speak. Often you will hear someone say that one paper is better than another but the 2 prints (on the 2 different papers) may very well have been made from different negatives.
    Given that you have your record of what a particular paper required to order to make a good contact print, you can even use this information to get a first exposure test of any new negative, especially if you have a densitometer, like you have. Consider this. If you measure your standard negative (a particular step that produced a gray tone that you want your sky to be) and you got a reading of 1.20, and your new negative (when you measure the sky area) gives you a reading of .90, then you will know that the sky will reproduce as your desired gray if you simply give 1 stop less exposure. (.30 = 1 stop and .90 is .30 less than 1.20).
    Now if your contact print exposure of the standard negative was 12 seconds then you can estimate the exposure of the new negative to be around 6 seconds (at the same light level).
    Rather than produce a whole series of exposures from 2 seconds to 20 seconds (a strip test like they show you in many videos), you can simply give a base exposure of 4 seconds and then added strips of 1 second exposures. With a 4 strip test you would then have 4, 5, 6, and 7 seconds and your first test will be much closer.
    The best thing about all this is that the more you do it the more you understand it and it becomes a way of working that makes more and more sense. It makes darkroom work a lot more enjoyable and it saves time.

    Hope this makes sense.

    Reply
  • November 14, 2017 at 7:19 am
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    Concerning my explanation about a "Standard Negative" …
    Dear Tim,
    this makes perfectly sense. I can´t wait to get back to the darkroom once I am done with my business trips.
    I hope you done´t mind that I come back in case of further questions.
    I will let you know how it goes.
    have a super week
    Best

    My Response….
    Yes, by all means ask questions. I want the discussion on the comments section of the video lesson where I offered these prints so that viewers can benefit from our dialogue. I purchased a roll of 42.5" x 35 feet of Foba Multi-Contrast (glossy) fiber based paper. It was based on the recommendation of Bruce Barnbaum, who I respect, as well as another user in England that recommended it to me. I made some contact prints onto the 21 Silver Step tablet that I sent you, and I did this onto the Foba paper as well as the Ilford Multigrade Fiber Paper that I have been using. The 21 Silver Step tablet is what I use as my standard Negative for purposes like this.
    I will post my results on a lesson where I explain how I use a standard negative in order to make decisions on what to purchase and how I use the materials. The Foba paper is at least 20% more costly than the Ilford so my findings will be interesting to say the least.

    Thanks,
    Tim

    Reply
  • December 10, 2017 at 5:03 am
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    Response from Singapore…
    Hi Tim,

    I received the package sent mid-November day before yesterday. Thanks for this!

    The prints look great, impressive to see the intensity of whites and black, especially on the print of the silk scarfs. Makes me strive for better results in the darkroom 🙂 I will need go through your lessons another time, especially the ones about masking. Really interesting.

    Reply
  • November 3, 2018 at 6:51 am
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    Date = 11/1/18 – The reference prints are no longer offered, but you can still see "real black and white photographs…"
    I just finished installing 28 framed black and white photographs ( 20" x 24" paper size) at Cheung Hing Restaurant in South San Francisco located at 333 Grand Ave (cross street is Linden Ave.). There is a print of Ansels' "The Golden Gate Before the Bridge" shot in 1932, one year before the Golden Gate Bridge began construction. Only 4 of the photographs were shot by me; most are from films I inherited from Robert Cameron, but there are also images shot by Frank Wing, Pat Hall (brother), Tom Cheng, John Hall (my father… listed as Haw Jun Hong) and Ansel Adams. This is a permanent display; as long as Cheung Hing is in business the photographs will be there, and although I may take some down to be replaced by new prints the Adams' print will always be there for viewing. I eat at Cheung Hing regularly because their food is excellent and reminds me of the food I used to order in San Francisco's Chinatown back in the 1960s. Also, unlike most restaurants the lighting is good… even at night.
    If you get a chance to come to SF make sure you go down south to South City; it's less than 30 minutes away.

    Reply

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