Q&A – Fuji Wormy Artifacts

Q&A - Fuji Wormy Artifacts



hey how's it going everyone this is why I'm here in today's Q&A video I want to talk about fujiwara artifacts this is something that I haven't talked about mostly because I've really not encountered it in my photography but in my trip to Atlantic City New Jersey this time around when I was actually taking photos at night I did encounter it so I do definitely want to talk about it I really have spent the last couple of days playing around with all the raw photos trying to figure out how I want to handle this type of artifacting and I got a couple of general rules that I want to share with you keep in mind though this is a very small sampling for me it's not like I'm going to have every example of this type of artifact thing that's going to happen but I think some of the general rules will be useful to you and definitely let me know if it helps you out in the comments below because I would love to know how other people handle it and also if any of my tips actually help you out so let's go ahead and take a look at this photograph right here one thing that I have noticed is that this type of artifact thing really only shows up in low-light photography at least it only does it for me so the thing that's going on right here is that when you're capturing photos in low light there's going to be a lot of noise in your photo and when you import it into Lightroom the sharpening the default sharpening in Lightroom is really causing this type of artifact thing so the thing that I'm gonna show you is how to actually adjust lightroom sharpening in order to compensate so that you don't get this type of artifact ting what I would recommend you do is you go to the detail panel in your Lightroom and what I would suggest here is you remove all the detailing so all the detailing straight to zero as you can see that already helps the artifact thing and then what I would do is I would zoom all the way back out I would select your Alt key and then what I would do is I would aggressively mask your photo so that you get only the sharpening that's important in your photography so all of the hard lines that's where you want all of your sharpening so when you zoom all the way in as you can see a lot of the artifacting is gone I'll go ahead and remove the masking as you can see when I remove the masking some of it comes back and if I remove the shut miss or if I put back in the sharpness detail again you can see the artifact and really show up but if I add both of them in there all that almost disappears now you can still see a little bit residual artifacting but it's so minimal at this point that I am perfectly happy with that but if you are still unhappy with that what I would recommend next is actually to apply a little bit of noise reduction that's actually a little bit too much yeah probably somewhere about there so a little bit of noise reduction to really get rid of it if you want to again so we started off here and then with a little bit of help we definitely were able to clean this up and then you can get a nice smooth image so those are kind of my general recommendations that I do for all of my night photography if I see this type of artifacting again I have to zoom in really far in order to see this artifacting so once you do the first two steps I really don't think the noise reduction is super necessary it's only if you want to be a perfectionist that you can apply there to really get rid of all the noise reduction but for me I'm pretty happy with just the first two steps on most of my photography and I'll show you a couple examples of that right now so right here this is one of my edited photos that I've already put out online and I really like the photography and how its edited if I go ahead and I zoom in on this sign right here you'll notice that the artifact thing is pretty much leave gone but I'll go ahead and I'll add back in the details and remove the masking and also the noise reduction and what you see right here is that the worm artifacts definitely are there but again it's very easy to get rid of once I actually remove the details do the masking and apply a little bit of noise reduction it really cleans up the photo really well and I'm perfectly happy with the remaining artifact thing that you can see a little bit right here but overall it cleans up the image super well and I'm really happy with the results of it let's go ahead and move on to the next photograph so this one right here this is another one that I really like and as you can see when i zoom in really far you really don't see the artifacting but if I go ahead and add back in the detail 225 remove the masking you can see the artifacting and it's something that you know isn't very good looking but once again it was really super easy for me to clean up moving the details to zero does really help it out so that's something that you definitely want to look at and do and then heavily masking it in this particular photo I didn't even add any noise reduction because I really don't think it needs it so I'm really happy with it just the way it is so that's two quick examples of how I use my tips so what I'm gonna show you now is eight photographs that I have edited half the photo is going to have the steps that I just talked about which is removing the details is zero heavily masking and apply a little bit of noise reduction and the other half of the photo actually does not have that so you actually see the warming artifacts and the reason why I'm doing this is because I want to show you that while the warming artifacts is very annoying because you're going to be pixel peeping as you're editing your photos in the overall image when you're looking at it after you're done editing everything else it's still very difficult to see now as a professional photographer if you're getting paid for this you definitely need to clean that up because you are getting paid and cleaning up this type of artifacting is definitely one of those steps you must do but for people like me is only posting these images out on the internet for reviews it's really not that big of a deal because most people won't even pick up on it so definitely let me know what you think if you have a different approach to how you remove this type of artifacting please leave it in the comments below because I would love to learn from you because there's definitely more than one way to handle this type of situations it's just that for my purposes this seems to be quite universal so I can easily apply that and then move on with my other type of editing anyhow thank you so much for watching this is kind of the first in a series of Q&A videos that I want to do if you have any questions for me please leave it in the comments below and what I'm going to do is I'm gonna start gathering questions and every one to three questions depending on how long it takes the answer I'm gonna go ahead and wrap it up into a five to six minute video and then I'm going to post it as a Q&A so definitely if you have any questions for me leave it below and I'll definitely start gathering them up thank you so much for watching I hope this video helped you out and I will see you in the next video

18 thoughts on “Q&A – Fuji Wormy Artifacts

  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Thanks 🙂
    One important question for me that I cannot find the answer to it.
    Q: When i shoot both Jpec and Raw, i put these two versions in Lightroom. However, I noticed that, if I edit my raw version to mimic the jpec version that came from my camera (x-t3), I really can’t! In all aspects, colour, shadow and highlight.
    My settings are: Classic Crom, with -2 highlights

    Can you please suggest how solve that matter!
    You can try to shoot both jpec and raw (classic chrome), and try to mimic the raw version in Lightroom to match the jpec. It would have a totally different look
    Sorry for the long question
    Cheers from Australia
    Ricky

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Should probably mention that worms are caused by a Lightroom incompatibility issue.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Just don't use LR

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    use irident x-transformer for convert raf file in DNG and disable sharpening in Adobe. use internal irident sharpen is very good.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Why o why are using LR?

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Wormy artifacts are so annoying when you crop in on an image… it just amplifies the problem. Interesting what others are saying about Capture One. It would be interesting to see a direct comparison of an image through Lightroom edit versus a Capture One edit.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    I always sharpen with capture one

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Thanks for the information. I look forward to more Q&A videos from you.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    You seem to use the same "compromise" I found necessary with LR. My problem is that this requires you to make the image slightly less sharp. I do mainly landscapes and architecture, and that is where you will notice the wormy effect regardless of the light conditions. It's especially noticeable in stone or brick buildings, trees, and mountains. You know… the best stuff to photograph. I am currently migrating to Capture 1, and there this issue completely disappears. It's not perfect (no Dehaze or auto-level tool) and it's got a learning curve, but it has two things I like… no wormy artifacts and no monthly subscription fee!

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Forget Lightroom and use Capture One Pro to import and edit the RAF files. Any further editing can be done in Affinity Photo. This will also save costs, a free Fuji version of Capture One is available. I use the XT3 and find that for 90% of the files the following settings produce a worm-free image…Sharpening to 170 / Threshold to 0.5 – Radius to 1.1 – Lum' to 0 ( yes 0 ). Any other adjustments, exposure etc, as required.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    You can also use lightroom’s enhance detail feature that removes most if not all of the wormy artefacts.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Have you noticed if the worms also show up in film simulation jpgs or is it mostly in raw files?

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Hi Wai Lam, The worm effects is the reason I now use Capture One and Affinity Photo with my Fuji Cameras. Much better as Capture one is free for Fuji Users and Affinity Photo has no monthly subscription.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    You forgot your introductory music.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    I am using Luminar and have never seen artifacts before. But after i changed Settings (X-H1) to DR400 from DR100 and Noise reduction to zero from -4 i think something like your artifacts showing up on my RAW files. I am not sure have to observe further. I think there is a relation

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Thanks for the information Wai, however, I currently use capture one and will incorporate Photoshop only when necessary. Capture one handles my Fuji raw files amazingly.

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    Thanks Wai. I remember walking on the Atlantic City Boardwalk in 1967… Nice vacation i had there..i don't know if it still possible to swim and if they preserve the beach with the implementation of the casinos…. Thx for this tutorial !!

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  • July 11, 2019 at 8:05 pm
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    I heard alot about the worms but actually it's never bothered me – maybe cuz I shot with my phone so long lol

    Reply

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