Megapixels And Printing Large Photos | 20×30 Prints With 12 Megapixels? | Real World Test

Megapixels And Printing Large Photos | 20x30 Prints With 12 Megapixels? | Real World Test



hello everybody today we're going to talk about digital photography printing and how many megapixels you really need to make a large print stay tuned welcome back everyone my name is Eric marks with finding middle-earth comm and today we're going to talk about digital photography printing so it's about one o'clock in the morning here where I live and I was just doing some post-processing in my office here and I suddenly got inspired to do this video because I was going over some images that I took recently and I came across one of them and that really stood out and every once in a while I'll want to print one of my images just for me not to sell not to give away just to hang in my office because it inspires me something about the location or maybe a memory you know while I was there shooting something about it just kind of you know just clicks and I want a print of it and so that just happened and I was in Photoshop resizing it for prints and I just it just kind of dawned upon me there's a lot of misconception out there and a lot of theories on how big you can actually print with certain megapixels and certain cameras so if you've come to this video to look for these spreadsheets on the width the length dimensions of the sensor based on prints there's a million other videos out there just like that and some of them are really great you can go watch those but I'm here to show you physical prints that I have actually made from certain cameras and we're just going to talk about if they look good or not so you'll have to excuse me the like I said in the last video the pollen is just kind of killing my allergies a little bit outside so I have some hot tea here that I'll be drinking periodically which I'm going to ahead and drink now actually that's a nice nice peach tea I always every time I do suppost processing I have a nice cup of hot tea with me it just I'm not from the UK so that this may be interesting for Americans I know every time I watch these British people's YouTube channels are always like oh it's stalk today all for the cup of tea and what's going to talk about Nick on cameras but I just love hot tea so I always normally have some hot tea and some Zen garden radio on Pandora playing while I'm doing some post-processing to just kind of get me in that chilled out mood and so anyway I'll be helping myself to that throughout the video but I have prepared some prints here I've just made them periodically over the last few months as kind of test prints really because a couple of clients have asked for these specifically and so anytime a client asks for a print I always send them to my print gallery but I before I upload them I normally do a test print at home on my Canon Pro 1 printer and the reason I do that is because just in case I missed a little dust spot or something tiny that I didn't see in the image before it's great to do a test print yourself so that you can see it kind of scaled larger in you know in person and just kind of prove it because if you have a customer spending you know $2,500 on a 40 by 60 print and they're printing it on metal you know you don't want to have to you know give them a refund and say oh let me just you know clone that out real quick in Photoshop and you know reshape your print that's going to be a big loss so test doing some tests and some proofs is always a good idea okay so I shoot with a 36 megapixel Nikon d810 and I've shot with tons of Nikon DSLRs over the years I've been with Nikon since day one and then throughout the years I've added some more stuff to my kid to just kind of play around with stuff I played around with a Canon 5d Mark 3 for a year played around with a sony a7r so it doesn't fear the things but I've always had my Nikon gear and I've never given that up so the first print I'm going to show you came from a 12 megapixel Nikon d3 okay and so – its 2016 currently and in my opinion those cameras still sell like hotcakes they're used obviously they don't sell them new anymore when they release they were probably five or six thousand dollars just like the Nikon d5 is now and it's too of megapixels it was it was great in low light it's still great in low light by today's standards the Nikon d3 is 12 megapixels full-frame but it's a great camera still I don't own one anymore but I you know I would love to get my hands on one again because it was just a great camera so this print here is a 13 by 19 and it was printed from a 12 megapixel Nikon d3 okay and I don't know about you but I think this print looks unbelievable I'm going to hold it up a little closer to the camera just you can kind of inspect it a little better and I mean the colors are vibrant its sharp there's tons of detail there and so all I did was just kind of resize this in Photoshop to the exact dimensions and I changed the pixel density to 300 dpi okay and I do that because most professional print labs require 300 dpi and Adobe RGB color scale those are all technical terms that just don't worry about them but that's basically you always want to resize your digital photo to the file size that you're trying to print and you don't wanna go too crazy I'm not sitting here saying that a you know 12 megapixel d 3100 can print billboard size I'm just saying there's a lot of misconception today that people think that 12 megapixels just isn't enough anymore and it kind of drives me crazy sometimes because it there's so many people out there that comment on I'm gonna set this down for a second to comment on YouTube videos and DP review forums and all this other stuff that just ripped these people apart that want 12 megapixel cameras in 2016 and they say oh well you know if you want to print 16 by 20 and 24 by 36 20 by 30 you know you're crazy you'll never do that with a 20 by 30 and what's so funny is the Nikon d3 d3s they came out around you know 2008 and 2009 or 10 or whatever and it's like people think that in 2008 no one was printing 20 by 30 they're acting like 20 by 30 didn't exist then a 20 by 30 print is a 20 by 30 print whether it's printed in 2008 or whether it's printed in 2016 and so people were making 20 by 30 prints with 12 megapixel cameras back when the d3 came out that was a d3 print is a 13 by 19 but I have also had this printed on 20 by 30 okay now I also have a Nikon d3100 app here that is actually my mom's camera I had her lend it to me for a video series that I was teaching because most people have these entry-level Nikon's and so I wanted to kind of teach the workshop based on those the mode dial that it has because my d810 doesn't have the traditional mode dial so I have this I'm borrowing this from my mom and I said you know are you okay if I just shoot a couple of photos of this because I just want to see what this you know entry level now you can get these used for like $200 with this little entry level DSLR will do okay so I took this entry-level DSLR and I made another print with it that was a 13 by 19 just like this and I actually didn't believe it or not I ended up selling that one so I don't have it with me but it also looked great on 13 by 19 however I will say that I have tried I ordered a 16 by 20 on the d3100 and it looked horrible and I resized it and I did everything but it just it didn't look good until you were standing a certain distance away so there is another a whole nother you know thing that comes into play with prints where people will say well you know you can't just say how big can I print with this megapixel count because it all depends on how close your viewers are going to be to the print right because these billboards that you see when you're driving down the highway if you saw them at you know two feet away they're going to look like the most pixelated pieces of garbage print you've ever seen but because you're viewing them from the highway and they're way up there in the sky they're going to look crystal clear so it all depends on you know how far your viewers I'm speaking strictly on if you wanted to get a print and give it to a family member or keep it for yourself to hang on a wall in your office or in your house that's what I was speaking about today so this 13 by 19 from the 12 megapixel d3 looks flawless I have another one from the Conde three 12-megapixel okay that I printed out a twenty by thirty so let's take a look at that okay so this is a twenty by thirty of the Great Smoky Mountains and it's got a rolled up this was again this was just a test print for me because I had a client order a really large one of these and I wanted to get a pretty large one myself to do a test so this here can't really straighten it all out for you but this was is a twenty by thirty on the D three as well so same cameras that other sunset print that you just saw let me show you kind of the detail in the sky I'll show you kind of the side see if I can unfold this side for you so you can kind of see I'll turn it vertical just you can see the detail in the grass and the mountains and so this is a 12 megapixel camera again it's full-frame okay so you're still getting this great image quality and it's just unbelievable that there's so many people that still think that you know with the 12 megapixel camera oh forget it if you know you can do an 8 by 10 hour nice wallet size but anyway so these these cameras can still do these wonderful size prints you just have to know proper technique obviously it has to be a tack sharp image straight out of the camera okay it has to be resized right in Photoshop has to be the right pixel density you want the colors to look right so you know a lot of it is is good technique in camera and post-processing wise but if you just have the good technique down which by the way I'll do another video on that in the future how I prep my files for printing but if you have good technique you can get these great 20 by 30 prints of a Nikon d3 I've seen people online get 40 by 60's out of the D 3s and again that's 12 megapixels it is a little bit of a sensor upgrade from the d3 so I've never actually printed that large with the d3 before excuse me and it just they look unbelievable so I have one more print that I'm going to show you I'm gonna take a sip of my tea ooh I'm getting it in this if you're a Harry Potter fan I took this while I was in Universal Studios in Orlando and this is of borgin and Burkes so if you can see that too well that plastic is reflecting off of my light here let me get out of the plastic since it's kind of a matte finish okay so this is borgin and Burkes and that is the it was an HDR that I did and that's the print thirteen by nineteen and this one is not from ad3 this is from a D 300 okay so this is the cropped sensor Nikon that's 12 megapixels and this is a 13 by 19 so now let's talk about this so I also tried this which was on a D 300 I tried this on 20 by 30 okay and it did not look very well at all unless I was standing maybe six feet away okay but this right here I'm can look at it like right in my face and it looks tack sharp and beautiful but the 20 by 30 it needed to be a few feet away from me to kind of look good so this is where the question comes into play why Eric did you print a 20 by 30 of this image of the mountains down here and on the 12 megapixel Nikon d3 and it looks wonderful but the 12 megapixel of the Nikon d300 which is the crop sensor 12 megapixels doesn't look so good full frame in crop sensor cameras print differently okay there is an image quality difference so these people that say it's all about the megapixels I'm sorry to inform you they are wrong now you know everyone can say that it's an opinion which it is that there's all opinions but the size of the sensor ultimately depicts the image quality in the final image how big you can size the image because if you're talking about crop sensor versus full-frame when you're sharing photos online they're all going to look fine because Facebook compresses the heck out of all the images anyway and so it's you know it's all about the same online but when you're talking about printing the full-frame sensor gives you the most image quality so that by the time you enlarge these on physical paper and make them a physical piece of art the full-frame sensor is what gives you that extra image quality as you can see that's why I wanted to do that so I have this 13 by 19 on d300 which looks good and then I made a 20 by 30 of this on the d300 the crop sensor 12 megapixel doesn't look very good again unless I'm maybe 6 feet away whereas the full-frame Nikon d3 on a 20 by 30 of this guy looked unbelievable in my opinion it looks so sharp and the detail is great and like I said the client of mine that ordered this and I wish I could have seen it he said he was very happy with it he wanted a 40 by 60 ok from a 12 megapixel Nikon z3 again I I made sure that any any image that I offer a print that large on I make sure that their tax sharp I make sure that you know everything is right so that there's no surprises when my when my client gets the print and says oh wow this is this looks kind of blurry this doesn't look how I thought it was going to look so make sure that you have good technique in camera and after the fact so that you can get these kind of print sizes but at the end of the day I just wanted to let everyone know here at now 1:30 2:00 in the morning that it is possible to get these larger format prints out of older 12 megapixel cameras as long as they're full-frame and as long as your technique is good and everything is sharp with the image so I'm going to be doing some more of these videos on this printing thing because since it kind of popped into my head I started researching on YouTube just to see what else was out there there's a lot of people that are just feeding people BS in my opinion about this print thing there I could it literally they think it's a halt about the megapixels you know if you have a crop sensor camera that's an 80 megapixel camera but it only goes up to ISO you know 200 you can still print the size of a bill but you know it's like you can also print the size of a billboard from an iPhone but it would have to be you know viewed from like 2 football fields away so it just it all depends on these factors and it's not all about megapixels so I've had a lot of people ask me this too so this is what I wanted to make this because if you have a 12 megapixel full-frame camera and you're using the right technique you can get these big prints for your office or given to family members for Christmas or sell them or whatever you want to do don't think that you know if you're trying to eat your hands on an old Nikon full-frame DSLR so that you don't have to spend three or four grand on the newer ones do it that's the great way to go the Nikon d3 is one of my favorite cameras of all time it's amazing I still regret so much to this day that I sold my d4 I'm actually currently trying to get my hands on another one I'm hoping to purchase it tomorrow actually I'm talking to an online camera store had a refurbished one pop-up so I'm hoping to get that tomorrow but I had a question I was asking them about the shutter count actuations but I the d4 is 16 megapixels and so you know again these these cameras the lower megapixels they're wonderful again I shoot with a d810 36 megapixels over here and I'm sure that can do wonderful I the biggest I printed with this is 40 by 60 but I've never personally printed that ever I've only done that four clients have ordered it from my SmugMug print gallery and every single time that someone purchases it by the way I always do a follow-up to say hey you know want to make sure everything's okay did you get the print and everything look good every single time oh my gosh it's unbelievable it's so crisp colors are vibrant and that just makes me so happy because I know that I did my job right with in camera after the camera all the way to physical delivery of the piece of art so thank you guys so much for watching this video I hope this random print information rant thing here at in the middle of the night has helped everybody and I'm going to finish my cup of tea and get back to work on processing my photos so everyone take care and have a great week bye if you would like to stay up to date on all of my latest photography videos and adventures click the big subscribe button below and if you would like to find out more about me and how to become a great photographer visit my website and finding middle-earth calm you

44 thoughts on “Megapixels And Printing Large Photos | 20×30 Prints With 12 Megapixels? | Real World Test

  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    good grief man nobody wants to look at your stinky socks. get some class idiot.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    too much misc. talk.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    这个人废话太多了

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    sir would you have the same result if the photos were taken from a smartphone 12MP camera.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Here we go again. The image quality it not determined by the sensor size. It is determined by the DESIGN of the sensor. The D3 was much more expensive than the cropped sensor cameras, and a large part of that is the design and build of the sensor. High quality sensors, of any size, are more expensive because they are more costly to manufacture.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Man nice Info BUT America is a WHOLE CONTINENT

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Printers use CMYK not RGB color space

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Thanks for the info…..

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Jesus get to the point. I don't care to hear about your sinus and what tea you are drinking!!

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    thank you very much for this video. I was looking forward to do some prints and wonder my cam is capable of that. its a nikon 12 mp camera and now I can test it

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    A pro RED videographer used stills of 6mpx for billboards, he did cigarette advertising & said it was all that was needed for full size billboards as they are printed at a lowly 75DPI 4mx12m. But like you said at 100km from 20m they look awesome he said. 12mpix=35mm film for resolution. Making a living is hard, so 2 thumbs up Bro.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    A 20x30in print is still a 20x30in print in 2019!!! Still love my Nikon D4s!

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    What printer and paper do you use?

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    A local photographer near me stitches together around 100 photos to make one massive 2 gigabyte image to print for customers. He can print large, LOL. I guess if you were to stitch multiple photo of even 9 or more on a crop sensor, you could print out quite large photos of high quality then.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    If you're not printing, and 99.5% of one's photos are going on social media, does the resolution matter at all?

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    I could see some Joe blow type making a billboard size picture of his dick so that no one could say he doesn't measure up.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Love the info. Wandered a little. A bit repetitive. But engaging, and the info I was looking for.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    You can print out at 96dpi and the print will look good, printers interpolate very well.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Blah blah blah tea blah blah socks blah blah. Nearly five minutes in no useful info. 🙁

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Thumbs up for the white socks. In every video, you should wear a different pair of socks, and show them to the camera.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    i did 20×30 prints from a 4mp 1D , sports/nature photo acting as a poster on wall in boys room, worked surprisingly well. I also did a cheap commercial job with a canon 60D camera using an old nikkor 80mm 1.8 at 1600 iso, was blown up to 5×3 metres, client was really happy ! so funny.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    What printer do you use must eat up the ink

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Marc, I also ask this question of another commentor, do you rez up your files for large prints or let the printer software do the interpolation?
    When I owned my own Epson 4000 printer and was using Image Print software , I found that the RIP software did a much better job of interpolating than I could do in Photoshop. What are you doing now in 2018 with your D810 four very large prints?
    I recently had a job knowing they were going to blow up the prints 4 or 5 feet wide that I shop with my 810 and found out that they were going to be printing out an Epson printer and I left the file as it is after my post processing with no rezzing up, telling the guy who was to print it that their software we do a better job of interpolating than I could. They did it enlarge it up 4 feet wide and it looks great.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Appreciate the perspective

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Nikon's best camera (arguably) is the 12mp D700. The lower MP count allows for larger photo-sites. All cameras that shot the film Avatar were only 2MP. The mega-pixel myth is real – so is pure ignorance.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    That's not tea. We drink proper, well brewed hot tea with 1 sugar and a drop of milk.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Upshot: Full Frame Sensors are Much better than Cropped Frame Sensors at the same Megapixels – when printing photographs – Just saved you nearly 20 Minutes

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    The only downside to lower megapixels is you can’t crop in. Which is what I tend to do

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Use some raw local honey it will tackle seasonal allergies

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Good but lengthy !

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    A full frame (or close) quality SENSOR + sufficient megapixels + a good lens and camera + a technically competent photographer = high rez large format prints. I think that says it all?

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    I printed tons of 20x30s 24x36s from D3 and d700 professionally. Probably saved 3 years of my life in uploading time, and postprocessing. You have these online reviews that serve the camera industry the most.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Hi Eric, in this vid (which really I enjoyed, because I have a 12mp ff camera and want to sell prints) you said you would do a video on preparing photos in Photoshop for print – you still going to do that? Thanks

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    You don't need to explain what's in your glass, or why you're drinking it, and you also don't need to announce that sip. Lol, I hope I don't sound like a dick but the beauty of "filming" this sort of thing is cutting the fat.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Interesting results. I saw a video from earlier this year in which 'The School of Photography' channel printed some shots from a Canon 5D Mk-IV and an Olympus em-1 Mk-II and printed 30"+ by something. The printer couldn't tell which were which.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    You do a really good British accent

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    20×30 is 3:2. 12MP is 4:3

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    How much megapixel needed to print 30"x40" high quality photo print ?

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    Excellent. Subscribed.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    So printwise, a sharp image from a 12Mpx crop will not look as nice as a sharp image from 2Mpx full frame? You never said why. Surely the data is the same.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    I still own a nikon D2X which I paid $5000.00 for new along with a $3400.00 Subal underwater housing which was specially made for my Nikon.
    Watching this video helped as I was considering upgrading but so expensive. I’ve traveled all over the world with this camera. It’s big and heavy and built like a tank. I think I’ll keep it. My prints look great.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    I've printed 40 x 60 many times with images from my old Nikon D70 6mp and no one would know it unless I told them.

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  • July 7, 2019 at 2:13 pm
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    your a legend mate. than you ! ill keep my d700 and make money on the d800e. I first got the 800e for landscape n stuff but I could do stiching and make a 100 mpx image with the d700 right?

    Reply

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