Is resin 3D printing worth it? (Elegoo Mars Review)

Is resin 3D printing worth it? (Elegoo Mars Review)


This is not a cheap 3D printer. It’s a very affordable 3D printer – but
unlike filament-based printers, the story doesn’t end there. So while the Elegoo Mars is an incredible,
high-detail resin printer, you can’t just it to any other machine that costs under 300
bucks. So today, we’ll look at whether Elegoo are
actually managing to democratize printing or if you should just stick to FDM. This video is sponsored by NordVPN, more on
them later. For some reason, when Elegoo introduced the
Mars for around 280 bucks, the internet just went crazy over it. But it’s not like the Mars did anything
really new and there were already machines like it out there. Even in a very similar price bracket, depending
on which machine was on sale at what time. My experience has mostly been with FDM so
far, filament-based printers, but I did have a Wanhao Duplicator 7 SLA printer for a good
while now, and even though it seems to be practically the same machine as the Mars,
I never really managed to warm up to the Duplicator 7 for many different reasons. So my take on the Mars is going to be from
that perspective, too. And I do actually like the Mars a lot more
than the D7. But let’s start out with the specs, and
they, too, are going to sound very faimilar. At its core is a 5.4” 1440p smartphone screen
that gets you a 12 by 6.8cm print area with a 50µ pixel size. The Z-Axis does 15.5cm, which I think is more
than enough for the build area – when you’re printing busts and stuff, you’re mostly
limited when it comes to how large you can scale them up by the 6.8cm maximum depth. Now, the resin the Mars is printing with cures
through quote-on-quote UV light, but technically, the 405nm wavelength is deep blueish purple
and not UV, you definitely won’t get a sunburn from it. So inside the printer, there’s a large UV
LED in the bottom that shines through that LCD screen, the LCD masks all the areas that
shouldn’t get exposed and cured and than with every layer, the print surface just moves
up a bit, lets some fresh resin flow under it and then cures the next layer below the
last one. This printer actually prints all your parts
upside down, but you can just flip them once they’re done. One of the great features of the Mars is that
it has a touchscreen interface and a USB port built right in. With the early cheap resin printers you’d
basically run the masking LCD directly as a second screen from a computer, which was
just horrible. If you’d leave your mouse cursor on the
wrong screen, you’d actually get just an extruded mouse cursor column just printed
next to your actual part, the computer couldn’t go into standby, windows update messages would
screw things up, you know, the whole deal. Here, you just save your print file to a USB
thumb drive and the printer handles the rest. So let’s actually have a look at a few prints! So, what did you see there? The yellow prints were done with Wanhao resin,
the clear and grey parts were Elegoo’s own resin. And there is a massive difference between
the two. I was never happy with the Wanhao D7, possibly
because I only ever used the Wanhao resin with it. The prints with Elegoo resin on the Mars are
clean, crisp, detailed, have only minimal warp, while the prints with the Wanhao resin
warped a lot, supports broke off during the print and actually, I could never get the
parts to fully harden and cure, even leaving them out in direct sunlight. These still feel tacky and soft, even after
two days of curing. When I did the exact same thing with the parts
printed from Elegoo resin, they actually turned pretty brown. What I’m told is happening here is that
the partially cured resin, as it comes directly off the printer, instead of curing to a clear,
strong plastic, actually breaks down from the more violent UV rays that are a natural
part of sunlight – the same ones that give you a sunburn. Supposedly, once parts are fully cured under
the “normal” 405nm light, they are much more UV resistant and won’t turn brown as
much anymore, which is why I’m building a curing station with these mains-powered
405nm LEDs. Overall, the print quality from Elegoo Mars
is damn impressive. I don’t think I’ve had a print actually
fail with this printer yet other than when it was clearly my fault for for example not
setting the bed correctly, they’ve all come out looking really great. The only thing that stood out as artifacts
are these lines that appear every now and then, I have no idea what they are. But overall, detail is great, reliability
is great and resin prints just always look fantastic. But of course, that comes at a price, not
just that you can’t really observe the print as it’s happening like with filament printers,
but the fact that you’re working with resin. Resin itself is nasty stuff, first of all,
it’s a sticky liquid, that, with this setup, you will inevitably get on your gloves that
you’ll of course be wearing when using the printer, that’s why I don’t have a ton
of footage of actually using the machine, because as soon as I put my gloves on and
start working with the printer or the parts, I don’t want to go back to the camera with
those same gloves and start smearing resin over it. I mean, if you try, you’ll barely get any
of the stuff on your gloves, but you never know for sure. And why wear gloves in the first place – some
people seem to think you don’t need them? Because resin is really nasty stuff. It’s not necessarily “toxic” in the
classic sense, but it can screw with how your immune system works and give you chemical
burns. Which look horrible. You definitely do not want to get this stuff
on your skin, definitely not repeatedly, or in your eyes, depending on the resin you should
also be wearing a respirator with an organics filter, and that’s not just me saying that,
it’s literally in the material safety datasheet from the manufacturers. There are a few newer resins that either don’t
smell… as much, or human noses just don’t pick it up, the Wanhao stuff smells horribly,
the Elegoo resin is a bit less smelly, but compared to printing PLA, it’s still really
bad. I’ve actually installed a fresh air ventilation
system here in the studio with an ERV so that I could use these resin printers at all. With the fumes just lingering in here, my
throat would start aching and my nose would start burning, so really not something you’d
want in your living room. There are also “plant based” resins now,
but as always, just because something is “natural” doesn’t really mean anything, the resin
is still nasty stuff. And of course, the prints right out of the
printer aren’t usable straight away. With a filament printer, you just reach in,
pop the print off the bed and that’s it, with resin printers you at least have to wash
off the resin from the surface of your prints, typically you do that with isopropyl alcohol
or any other oragnic solvent. Just like with the “plant based” resins,
there are now some resins that are water washable, but you still can’t do that in the sink
like it’s implied, because with both water or IPA, you can absolutely not pour this stuff
down the drain once it’s contaminated with resin. This is essentially hazardous waste. Okay, and once you’ve washed your parts
you still need to fully cure them, because they will at least be somewhat tacky still
on the surface and sometimes even still soft all the way through. And all this combined makes it really hard
to properly compare filament printing to resin printing when it comes to cost and effort,
because for resin printer especially, the printer itself is just such a small cog in
the entire setup. Once you add up accessories and consumables,
you’re easily spending another hundred or more bucks on top of the printer itself. The resin itself is actually, I’d say, very
reasonably priced now, these half-liter, roughly 500g bottles of Elegoo resin are 25€ and
you can get them Prime shipped; and considering you’re not usually printing large, chunky
parts completely solid with these resin printers, that’s actually not too far off from what
filaments costs. It’s still more expensive, but very reasonable
for being a less commoditized material I think. On the other hand, I’ve probably spent as
much on nitrile gloves as I did on resin. Speaking of parts that are hollow – the software. And I’m actually pretty happy with it! What Elegoo are recommending is ChiTuBox – which
is a closed-source software that’s definitely not GDPR-compliant, that you can use for free
for non-commercial purposes. There’s no option for anything but private
use – yet, but down the road it looks like there will be a paid ChiTuBox Pro version
with, quote, more features. The good thing is, it comes with a profile
for the Mars that works really well out of the box – unlike the Wanhao D7 where I had
to manually set up one of three different profiles in their software and none of the
ones they suggested was actually “correct”. In ChiTuBox, you can add supports, automatically
or manually, tweak your basic print settings, rotate, scale, align parts, all the stuff
you’d expect. You can also hollow out parts like this bust
that don’t need to be super strong and would just use a ton of material if you’d print
it solid. I think that’s a pretty neat feature, but
I still need to figure out the best way to then add holes so the resin that’s trapped
inside the part can actually escape. With the parts that I’ve been printing hollow,
the holes were often too closed up after a print and I’d have to manually peel them
open, and even then there would still be uncured resin stuck inside the part forever. It’s probably best to have three or more
holes in opposite corners on a hollow part so that you can properly wash the inside,
too. The hollow feature sometimes struggles a bit
with models that have multiple intersecting shells, so with this one, I first combined
the bigger shells in Meshmixer and after that, it worked fine. And again, look at that print quality! Now, speaking of software: Remember that video
that I did on why you shouldn’t download and print gcode from the internet because
you don’t really know what’s in there and it could wreck your printer? It’s the same with SLA, there’s plenty
of mischief to be made with SLA printers if you just use random print files you found…
somewhere. But in either case, if the internet connection
you’re using isn’t trustworthy, then those files can still be manipulated right before
they get to you. Now, while that probably isn’t an issue
for print files, it is a very real issue for using any of your private online stuff like
banking, email. social media – not just could someone manipulate
what you’re seeing or splice in some malware, but they could also end up stealing your passwords
and your data. So that’s where NordVPN comes in. When I was travelling to ERRF this last weekend,
I used their VPN service to stay safe in public WiFis at the airport, in my hotel and any
other public WiFi I was using along the way. What a VPN does is that it adds a layer of
encryption on all the data to and from your device. And while it’s encrypted, nobody can spy
on your data or manipulate what you’re getting. Now, if you’ve seen others talk about NordVPN,
you’ll no doubt have heard that they’re using “military-grade encryption”, so
I looked up what algorithm they actually use, and it’s AES-256 with a 2048bit key, which
is basically uncrackable encryption. They’re using the OpenVPN protocol, so you
can use it with basically any device, but NordVPN are also providing really easy-to-use
apps for Android, iOS, Windows, Mac, Linux and a Firefox and Chrome plugin and guides
for basically every device that can use it. Go to nordvpn.com/tomsanladerer, that link
is also in the description, and you’ll get 70% off for a monthly cost of $3.49, which
actually is a really good deal, I’ve paid more for worse VPNs before. NordVPN works with any application you’re
running, they don’t keep logs and you can use them from practically anywhere in the
world and appear as if you’re using the internet form any of their servers around
the world. If you sign up through nordvpn.com/tomsanladerer,
you’ll also get one one extra month for free, but in either case, it’s a 30 day
no-risk trial. Thank you NordVPN for sponsoring this video. Okay, back to the printer: Build quality is
very good. There’s no Z-wobble, the parts feel solid
and even the resin container, the vat is a heavy chunk of milled aluminum. Elegoo also offer a 4-pack of plastic vats
for a very reasonable price, and I think it’s basically a must-have if you’re printing
with more than one type or color of resin. Cleaning out the vat just to print with a
different resin is really not fun, and in this one that has the clear resin in it right
now you can still see some leftovers from the yellow Wanhao stuff even though I cleaned
it out as well as I could. The printer is also quite loud during use
– and the only source of noise is that fan that
cools the UV LED in the bottom here. It’s always on and it’s definitely noisier
than a quiet filament printer, but maybe a fan swap can solve that. Then again, you probably don’t want to be
in the same room as the printer anyways because fumes. And two more things on the topic of the UV
LED – because apparently the Mars only uses a simple reflector to “spread” the light
from the LED over the entire print area, I’ve been told that you can run into issues where
the center actually gets exposed more than the edges of the print area, but I’ve not
run into that; and supposedly the LCD screen used in here can or will fail at some point
due to the near-UV light. I’ve heard anywhere from 1000 hours – which
would be after just a few bottles of resin – to tens of thousands of hours. Just something to keep in mind, the screen
may be a consumable, but thankfully, the actual screen part itself is only 30 bucks in materials
if you can manage to swap it yourself. If not, well… too bad. And of course, the LCD is right under the
print surface, so if your Mars is missing that one retention screw like mine did, the
aluminum bed will shoot straight down towards the LCD when you level the build plate for
the first time. It’s a quality control issue that shouldn’t
happen, so check that your printer has this screw right here installed before you loosen
the bed for leveling. But other than that, the leveling mechanism
is actually pretty simple and effective. The actual touchscreen LCD is right up front
and makes the printer easy to use, there’s everything on there that you’ll need to
run the Mars, you even get small thumbnails of the print you’re about to start, but
the USB port is on the back, which, just like the Ultimaker having its spool mounts on the
back, is kind of inconvenient. So is the Elegoo Mars a good 3D printer? Yes. I’m really happy with it, but then again,
it feels like a resin printer itself shouldn’t be hard to get right. I know everybody likes car analogies, so just
comparing different resin printers is like comparing different car engines – it’s definitely
the core part of a fossil-powered car, but there’s so much more to a vehicle than just
the engine. Like, this is a good engine, but that’s
all it is. So, really, a good system for resin printing
should also factor in some way of cleaning the parts, resin handling, which Elegoo actually
does comparatively well at with the VAT packs, and it should also include a way to correctly
cure parts. That makes it hard to compare a resin “printing
engine” with a filament printer where you don’t really need anything else but the
printer itself to produce parts. But still, if you’re looking for just a
resin printer, the Mars is a super solid choice right now. And if you’ve been watching my stuff for
a while, I’m very cautious with saying something is “the best” one, because I usually haven’t
thoroughly tested every single other machine there is, but this is definitely the best
one I’ve ever used. Sample size 2. So thanks for watching, let me know in the
comments what your take is on resin printers – too much hassle? Totally worth it? I’m still undecided. Thanks again to NordVPN for sponsoring this
video and to all my Patrons and YouTube members for supporting the channel directly, check
out the links to the Mars and the VAT pack in the description and I’ll be back with
cool stuff from the East Coast RepRap Festival in the next one! See ya!

100 thoughts on “Is resin 3D printing worth it? (Elegoo Mars Review)

  • October 18, 2019 at 8:23 pm
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    I feel like in the future we will have resin printers that are similar to todays inkjet printers:
    fully enclosed and the parts would come out fully cured. You would only need to regularry replace the "ink cartrigdes"

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 8:42 pm
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    Dealing with the chemicals sounds like a pain, but not very different from a number of other Maker media: woodworking (finishes, strippers, and some wood species' sawdusts are toxic), olde-tyme photography (various developers), metalworking (lead and other toxic metals), even dollmaking (ceramic dust can damage your lungs).

    My rules of thumb for any Making are: Find non-toxic alternatives when possible; strictly follow the safety instructions; read the warnings on the Material Safety Data Sheets; consider the impact on the planet as well has your home.

    Thanks for the very informative video!

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 8:43 pm
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    Just a heads up they just announced the Mars pro today on twitter runs I believe $300 has the USB moved to the front and they added a charcoal filter to it and a few other updates to the unit.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 8:44 pm
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    I can already here that he regulare watches LTT: "Speaking of…" 😜
    This Printer looks cool, but i would go for the SL1 or better SL2 when it comes out. 😎🙌
    Thx for the Content and i hope to see more interesting Stuff on you're Channel in the next Time.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 8:53 pm
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    Those resins seem like a cancer epidemic in the making.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:01 pm
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    Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio, a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:01 pm
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    Great video! Print quality from SLA is really amazing. But for functional parts FDM is much better. SLS will become the future but they are still to expensive for private use.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:15 pm
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    One of the reasons why Elegoo Mars stood out is that it was the first 1440p "very cheap" MSLA printer in a sea of 1080p ones (that many others YT channels reviewed). It doesn't sound like much, but the difference is very noticeable.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:17 pm
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    i say yes, because it's simple for beginers, it's more messy but common sense and proper PPE makes it fine, my experience with FDM printers is you need to have coding abilities in order to print almost everything you put into the FDM printer, all this g code rubbish and fiddling around with infill, and layer height and axis travels, it drives me crazy and i hated it, i just want to find a stl file i like or want, buy it, or download it if it's free put it thru the slicer save it to the usb and freakin print the damn thing, the elegoo mars DOES THAT, the cleaning process is hardly as irritating as trying to write a bunch of garbage in so your FDM will print anything and then it doesnt usually look super great anyways (unless you tinker with it for hours and have many failed prints until it's amazing)

    with the elegoo, the prints are just always amazing

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:17 pm
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    Yep, Botulinum toxin is natural but it will still kill you. Resin printing is still far too much hassle for me. FDM is far better imho.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:29 pm
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    Purchased one of these about 2 months ago. After stumbling through a few prints with clear resin, I found my groove with some Elegoo grey. The quality and precision are amazing. I've created prints with a resolution higher than my eyes can even see.

    As for your "lines" . . . I use a 12s ON-1s OFF exposure for (non clear) resins as the resin still hardens slightly after exposure. I don't have any lines that are detectable with out careful inspection or a magnifying glass.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:35 pm
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    Tom – Sample size two
    Media – Best resin printer available confirmed

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:45 pm
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    gahhh i want the vat pack, but it doesnt seem to be sold anymore anyplace 🙁

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:51 pm
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    Double or triple glove, so you can remove one layer at a time.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 9:53 pm
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    Of course it is I use it all the time.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 10:00 pm
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    Where did you get that led!!! Ive taken apart a 20W UV flood lamp and im currently doing the electronics to fit it into my DIY UV chamber, i wish i had that!

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 10:12 pm
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    the Mars pro they announced fixed a lot of issues you disliked about it.go have a look

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 10:31 pm
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    Will you ever be reviewing the SL1?

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 10:49 pm
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    The weird lines that appear now and then are also something that I've observed on the Anycubic Photon in our lab. Any idea what causes them? Is it something in common between the two printers, perhaps?

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 10:56 pm
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    It could be older resins and new recipes could have changed it, but the resin prints that I printed years ago (5 years in some cases) are breaking down, even after being cured. Much like before putting them under a curing light, they are softening and becoming tacky again. This is even with painted minis where the resin itself is not being exposed to light. Resin printers could be great for printing stuff for casting, but they are not permanent objects.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 11:09 pm
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    It's a little bit of a weird request, but that's a badass jumper/hoodie. Where did you get it from?

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 11:11 pm
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    I just bought a Elegoo mars for making parts for models, scratch builds and such. not some thing I can use a FDM printer for, but I will most likely make some sort of contraption/box thingy-ma-bob I can stick the printer in too, and vent out the fumes to the outside.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 11:27 pm
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    Too late. Bought a Mars 2 weeks ago. The build quality really surprised me…. Very solid construction. Also, worked perfectly out of the box.

    Reply
  • October 18, 2019 at 11:52 pm
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    With resin printers, you need to have a use for it. Like minis for example, your not going to get the quality and speed with FDM compared to resin. You CAN get good FDM minis but with the expense of time, where you could print a whole plate full in the same time as a single one. (Assuming the z height is the same) it has many advantages in that respect. For larger or strength required parts, FDM wins all day everyday. Resin is very brittle even tho it has a high tensile strength.

    For me I mostly print minis and arts and crafty things so resin is amazing. The details are epic, not having to sand as much (just supports) is absolutely worth the added expense over FDM for post processing.

    The wash set-up, I see non-issue with Ikea containers vs some ridiculously overpriced container system, like the forms station. There's no way you can justify spending that much money for what it does. There just containers… And you can print a mount to hold the plate in the bath. Which also is a great way to cut down on mess and gloves.

    I do agree they should supply a proper curing light but that would be added cost and it easy to source a cheap UV light setup.

    I simply transfer my plate onto amount and let it soak in a container without even using a glove, because I'm only touching the knob to unbolt the plate from the printer. I only wear when handling uncured prints or cleaning. Rubber reusable kitchen gloves are also a much better solution to wasting hundreds of gloves.

    The smell I also found varies per brand of resin and by the person. I personally am not slightly bothered by the smell. I smell way worse at work lol but that's my opinion (and many others) my gf HATES when I print ABS filament and says it stinks but has never said anything about the resin.

    Ultimately it depends what you wanna make/print. I personally like having both resin and FDM printers. Miniatures and small detail items are great in resin and larger prints in FDM.

    I recently made a Rick Sanchez mask and printed all in PLA and printed the eyes in resin as I KNEW the hole would be an issue with FDM or require some post processing. Where the resin eyes came out flawless.

    You can't really say one's better than the other when they both have their own strengths and weaknesses.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 12:03 am
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    Having been a screen printer in poorly ventilated PCB fabs, I already have a lifetime exposure to resins and solvents. This is not something I am willing to put in my house.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 12:07 am
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    Nice trick of flipping the print upside down once it's finished. Does this work for FDM too? Don't really want to get into resins just yet.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 12:16 am
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    Tom, glad you mentioned those resins are nasty, but really there has to be some emphasis that they are TOXIC in the monomer state. So when those are still liquid they are really toxic long term. I noticed many Youtubers under estimate that. Those acrylic resins become totally safe once totally polymerised but before being really cured they are really toxic.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 12:20 am
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    I think that resin printers are a lot of hassle and are for people who have a lot of experience with 3D printing. I think that a person could get a resin printer after getting an fdm printer.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 12:24 am
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    I worked in a plastic shop for 15 years, and yes you'd must be aware of fumes and hazardous waste handling. Couple of tips 1# to save on ipa put your part in a Ziploc bag and use a ultrasound cleaner with water in it. Make sure the top of the Ziploc bag is sealed and no holes. That way there is no fire hazzard. Tip 2# use a uv lamp on the ipa for a hour or so. Then filter the ipa out. The resin is cured and you can throw away the plastic and reuse the ipa. Tip 3# build a fume hood an vent outdoors. Make a window adaptor similar to a window AC unit adaptor to run your hoses. Can use it also for painting too.

    Yes this resin printer can be used for making many things like for metal casting, lab equipment, jewelery and prototyping parts.
    I have had lots of hobbies, woodworking and metal working. Fixing old classic cars ect. ect. If you think working with resin is a big hassle then you need to take up knitting.
    Oh! go out and buy some finished AD&D models, they cost a small fortune. This is ware you really save money. Have you seen the prices lately.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 1:05 am
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    Why bother with holes when you can keep the bottom completely open? I always mounted my bronze figures to a base, anyway. Should be the same for a resin figure.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 1:08 am
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    Free idea for resin printer manufacturers: make a compartment at the bottom of the printer for curing parts with the same UV LED.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 1:10 am
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    Resin printing turned me off with the price of the resin, but if it's floating around $25 (a ltr?) – it's a lot more tempting. My custom FDM wont come close to resin quality even with a .2mm nozzle.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 1:15 am
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    Great job on this video Thomas!!! I thoroughly enjoyed it. I've had my Mars for about three months now and I really love it!! (old, still working printer is a very stable reworked to the nines, AMX-AnetA8). and yes, each has it's purpose and both are very useful!!!

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 1:57 am
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    I think if you are into printing models that have a lot of detail, a resin printer is a great way to capture all that detail. An FDM just isn't going to do it no matter how fine tuned you got it.
    The key thing is the size. You have a very small build area and while some companies are making Ipad sized resin printers, these smaller machines aren't near that.

    Maintenance – The LCD screen will fail thanks to the UV. The FEP will fail after enough use or accident. Though FDM's have parts that will need replacement.

    Smell – Just because you can't smell it doesn't mean nothing is in the air. Odor wise the Anycubic eco resin doesn't really smell terrible. It's closer to a generic plant stem. Anycubic's regular resin is low but not that low. I can still make out some of the odor after clearing the tank and not running for a few days. The eco stuff never stuck.

    Safety – No one says non toxic. I keep seeing this use for some resins like the plant based stuff by posters but the actual companies have never made that claim. Ease of smell and cleaning, sure but the never claim safe to handle with your bare hands until after curing.

    I agree with others, an FDM printer should probably be first because if they can't handle that, they can't handle a resin printer. If you are a painter/caster, someone working with similar chemicals that is an exception.This is business as usual.

    For me I take 5 to 10 minute between the clean to putting it under a uv lamp. I wear a mask and gloves but I think I've done more clean up with FDM with all the support and filament bits.
    Cleaning wise, beside IPA, there are some effective but less smelly and safer chemicals to use that are worth exploring. There is definitely an opportunity for a solid cleaning station that goes from the tank to the UV without ever being exposed.

    The Mars Pro might help address the fumes a little more but I feel like the fumes pop up after the print is done and the lid is off.

    I'm loving the mars right now. Will I feel the same in a year?

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 2:24 am
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    FWIW, the Prusa resins don't smell as strong (they do smell, and I have an open window near my SL1), and they don't burn or even irritate the skin. It's messy, but no worse than paint or glue.

    I like the vat pack container approach on the Mars. That's really smart.

    But, I really like the washing/curing station with the Prusa (it's not available separately, but it's a huge time and mess saver). If you can try out that system on-channel, you should. Yes, you pay quite a bit for all that, but I don't mind supporting Prusa.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 2:27 am
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    Very thoughtful video, Tom. Thanks for that approach. I too find the fumes and the hassles of resin printing to be beyond my threshold of hobby enjoyment.

    Reply
  • October 19, 2019 at 2:49 am
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    Between the single white glove, and the jacket, you've got quite the Michael Jackson look going on 🙂

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  • October 19, 2019 at 2:51 am
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    I really like the detail you can get from resin printing, but the process is what kills it for me. If an individual is a N or H/O scale train enthusiast it would be perfect for them in making custom parts.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 2:54 am
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    resin printers are still a hassle by 2019 standards, even for some people FDM is already a big hassle, not to mention the toxicity (is that even a word?) of the resin used (even though anycubic does have soy based resin which is "safer" but take it with a grain of salt)

    im guessing if it does go mainstream FDM will be the household printer while resin will be the more professional/niche stuff because the amount of money you spend is worse than an inkjet printer & its cartridges, not to mention the "curing" bit and waste disposal

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  • October 19, 2019 at 3:36 am
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    Careful shaking the resin, every brand I've used ends up leaking at the cap. I use a paper towel wrapped around the top whenever I shake it.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 4:13 am
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    I am absolutely in love with my resin SLA printer. I have an Epax X1 that is very similar to the Mars, it has a few ease of living items (factory bed plate leveling, no need to ever level it again, that type of thing), but both of them are light years better than an FDM printer for miniatures and high detail items.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 4:40 am
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    One thing people don't abide by is local hazardous waste disposal, and resin printing is one huge hazardous waste generator. I was once in charge of material safety date sheets at an old job I had. Reading the MSDs for the resin makes me cringe. Nearly everything coming off those printers should have a warning label attached to them. My local laws have convinced me to stay far away from resin printing as it currently stands. If I want a resin printed object, I'll just pay a professional for it who, I hope, maintains proper disposal procedures.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 4:58 am
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    Resin printers are indeed totally worth it for that level of detail so long you hold your nose and don't breathe around it or your work. Of the product — for the display, there shouldn't be any issue with creating a UV-resistant backing plate to hot snot behind it to help with longevity, and the suggestion of a fan swap is nice to know because your first time using it is always going to be the safest; once it's full of resin, it's full of liquid death you should not inhale. The USB issue is easily solved with an extra USB extension lead and a 3D-printed part to retain the socket end.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 5:07 am
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    Great review! Do you know, what is the strength difference between filament printing and resin printing?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 5:33 am
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    The fact that you are handling the prints even after curing with a glove turns me off.
    I use Norton vpn on all of my devises and am happy with it .

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  • October 19, 2019 at 6:25 am
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    I'd love to see you extensively review the Prusa SL1 and the Curing/Washing machine. I think Prusa was trying to make the process as easy as possible (of course you still have to get resin in and out of the machine).

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  • October 19, 2019 at 7:19 am
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    Before going to Resin printers you could also try FDM printing with smaller nozzles. I recently did this to get better details on a small functional part in PETG, and I was really happy with the result. This was on a stock Ender3 pro.
    This will for sure not come close to what a resin printer can do. But if you want more detail than what the default 0.4mm FDM does, just spend a couple of bucks on a smaller nozzle.
    Maybe an idea for a new video?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 7:47 am
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    So all my thoughts about resin printers, the waste of material and nastiness, are true. Good to have that confirmed – so its still a no go for me.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 8:26 am
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    What about PHOTON?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 8:47 am
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    Not contesting the hazardous waste line, but just wondering aloud. Can't you just evap the IPA and cure what's left, then drop the dust into the trash? Speculating as someone who hasn't ever S'd an LA, but if IPA interfered with curing, then I'd imagine it'd ruin the integrity of a lot of prints just to wash them before curing.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:04 am
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    I've used the elegoo mars for about 5 months now and it's been great, far better then my last resin printer. Chitubox has some glitches but they are easily fixed by using the photonsters file validator tool.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:07 am
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    Thats Pteter Mckinnon Intro music!!! 😉

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:22 am
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    Great video, was considering buying one but after this video I've realised for me it would be way too much hassle ;so very useful.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:24 am
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    I would consider building a ventilated glovebox for the printer and all the accessories. I know it isn't that dangerous, but it might be less hassle in the long run.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:51 am
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    Little off topic but with plastic and resin printers being so common, I wonder why no home solutions for powder based printing. It sounds like it has some benefits like not needing to print supports and a lot of materials.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:00 pm
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    I have a monoprice which is the Duplicator D7 so interested in hearing your take on the elegoo

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:08 pm
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    as a daily user of Form 2 SLA printer, and occasional user of FDM (ender 3) at home, i can promise you, there is nothing better than form 2. the ease of use, and the detail of the print… just no comparison.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:09 pm
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    Nice walkthrough and review
    Thanks for sharing 🙂

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:36 pm
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    2:33 /* This printer, actually, prints all your parts upside down. But you can just flip them, once they done. */

    Quite useful advice! 🙂
    Thanks, Tom!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:48 pm
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    Hi, Thomas! Why are you suffering from this thing by not using a mask? I don't think that people will set you dislikes for seeing a safety device on your face.
    On myself I think that quality vs safety(+hardness of use) wins on the safety side. So I will not buy any resin based printer until manufacturers will find formulae that will be giving near completely safe resins. I prefer to finish FDM prints than struggling with these issues that you've shown us.
    Thank you for the review! Take care of your health!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:59 pm
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    What's the brand of that sweater?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 1:05 pm
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    To the pople who think you don't need gloves for resin: "It messes with your immune system" like Tom said means: to some people handling it repeatedly causes the body to develop allergies to all kinds of plastics, (yes that means even in cured forms). So those itchy "burns" you might see when touching liquid resins for too long, you might get when just touching your prints, but also all kinds of stuff we make from plastics: toys, clothing, car interiors, kitchenware and what not for the rest of your life… The medical term is "contact dermatitis" and yes while that also comes from handling plastics in general, handling them in a liquid form has a much greater impact, for various resons.
    It seems like a big gamble to me, considering the insurance price to pay are just cheap working gloves

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  • October 19, 2019 at 1:07 pm
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    windows updates =D haha

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  • October 19, 2019 at 1:24 pm
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    *Sample size = 2! Another great video, Tom. Thank you.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 1:52 pm
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    Great honest review. I know there is a lot of embuggerance using resin but I was happy to take the plunge on this fairly solid and reliable printer. Just wish I could find someone stocking the spare resin tank kits, as changing out is a complete pain!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 2:00 pm
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    Great presentation! I'd ordered the Mars a few months back and have not had the time to set it up in a safe area and get the supplies needed. Now I see that I'll need to add some kind of epic ventilation solution as well. The four pack of resin trays seems to be sold out (it's not showing on Amazon). Does anyone know of an alternative source or compatible tray?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 2:36 pm
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    What jacket are you wearing? It looks very comfortable!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 2:40 pm
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    Just a heads up! Their Pro model comes out for $300 in November, and has a bunch of improvements.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 3:38 pm
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    This is the first time I've heard the pronunciation of your last name. I was way off. Nice review of the printer. Every time I hear about resin printers the more it makes me want to stay as far away from them as possible. You may get very nice results but the potential mess and health hazards are not worth it (for me). I would be interested to see someone come up with some lower cost powder based printing system to get you the same print quality as the resin printers that may have a little bit less mess and hazards than dealing with resin.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 3:48 pm
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    There's no industry definition of what's "all-natural" and food manufacturers abuse this term to sell you more expensive items under the guise of them being "100% natural" or similar, when that doesn't mean anything and it's not defined under any food legislation code anywhere.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 4:28 pm
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    ChiTuBox (The one i got with my Mars), actually has a "hole" feature you can use to make a square, round, or hexagonal hole into your hollowed prints to let the goo out and the Alcohol in. There's even an option to "Keep Hole", where it will make a separate body representing the hole it removed so if you like, you can glue the model back together. I don't know if a tolerance is built into that or not, but resin swells slightly as it cures so you could find that the hole needs some help to fit. (I haven't tried printing holes, only snap-fit parts, which worked with about 0.013" tolerance between them. I printed Hot Wheels car-sized rims with removable/swappable tires.) The advantage is that if you can be clean about it, you could use uncured resin as glue, and throw it into your curing station to get a good bond.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 4:30 pm
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    Maybe a still can be used to recycle the alcohol instead of having to dispose of it all the time.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 4:57 pm
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    If i had a better ventilated space id consider a resin printer.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 5:29 pm
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    Congratulations on getting a sponsorship with NordVPN!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 5:45 pm
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    Another mention of nordvpn IN THE MIDDLE of your video and I will unsubscribe. make it easier fr your subscribers to skip it

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  • October 19, 2019 at 6:09 pm
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    Turn down your exposure, the whole video is over-exposed.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 6:43 pm
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    What is that sweater, it looks nice

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  • October 19, 2019 at 6:51 pm
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    Thomas glad you made it home safe. Thanks for the info you give us.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 8:37 pm
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    Purple != Violet

    Purple is a color that does not exist in the visual light spectrum and is a phenomenon resultant to having trichromatic vision.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 8:40 pm
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    Meh, too much of a headache to bother.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 8:53 pm
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    Tom, do you have an air filter or air scrubber for your studio? I assume your studio doesn’t have an adequate number of windows based on your video lighting and is fairly small as is with most studios.

    Please consider doing a video on how you maintain clean air quality. There’s a lack of quality information regarding this subject, especially from people who actually know what they’re talking about

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:04 pm
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    Good overview of resin-printing! Meshmixer does that hollow+holes combo (guessing 300ppl already wrote it tho)

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:22 pm
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    Great sponsor but who makes your jumper?For me the downsides out way the quality. Definitely need a dedicated space for these.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 9:41 pm
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    Does anyone know what the LED lamp was at minute 5:20? I have a rigged setup, but this piece of hardware look interesting.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:19 pm
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    SLA is great. Build volumes way to small to make them useful

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:33 pm
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    How accurate is dimensional tolerance / stability on a resin printer? Detail is one thing, accuracy is another. Can I paint tiny functional mechanical parts?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:39 pm
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    So what should a responsible person do with IPA or water used to wash resin?

    Damn I love IPA.. whaddup BrewDog!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:42 pm
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    My card details were stolen when I used a hotel wifi to book a train ticket. If I had used a VPN…

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:55 pm
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    I liked the configuration of having one hand with a glove and the other without 🙂

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:55 pm
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    I get that this is your living but the segue into an advert partway through this led me to unsubscribe. I am here for 3D printing videos, not a huge long advert.

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  • October 19, 2019 at 11:37 pm
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    always remember staf is natural and so is cobra venom

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  • October 20, 2019 at 1:48 am
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    I put my printers in a cabinet with dedicated vent system and located on the balcony. in the same time, i noticed that high quality resin doesn't volatilize much? almost no smell(just cost maybe 3 times more). whatever it is, i wear gloves and mask with carbon filter with vent on all the time. take it seriously

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  • October 20, 2019 at 3:04 am
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    Completely unrelated to SLA printing but anyone know what sweatshirt Thomas is wearing?

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  • October 20, 2019 at 3:52 am
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    The Anycubic Photon S looks more stirdy and are more silent.

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  • October 20, 2019 at 5:49 am
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    Any UV curing resin can absorb directly into your skin, then cure inside you. Any individual exposure is likely microscopic and rather trivial in and of itself, but each incident will be additive.

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  • October 20, 2019 at 5:57 am
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    I'm experienced with the peopoly moai machines. I actually find SLA printing to be much more fun because I don't have to worry about mechanical parts as much, heat sinks, nuts n bolts etc. failing. The liquid resin part is kind of annoying but that's just something that slows me down a little. In the end I think one just needs to do a lot of printing with these types of printers (in a garage or a room with a lot of ventilation) and then it will just become second nature like FDM printing is for Thomas. I recommend buying a UV lamp from peopoly or matterhackers. You can also use that lamp to cure the resin that is in the IPA, strain it out and then throw the cured resin away in its hardened form so that it is less toxic. I also recommend smearing dawn dish soap on the part after washing it in IPA. Then let it soak in warm water for a half hour or so. That gets the tackiness off quite a lot. Curing won't remove the tackiness ime. Also keep in mind that not all resins are created equal and some give off worse fumes than others. I also find CA glue to be way more toxic to myself. So it's not like high toxicity is a new thing that model makers have to be aware of 😉 The peopoly resin is kind of like smelling permanent markers for too long, so definitely have to put it in my garage. But at least it doesn't make me choke or mess up my nose and throat. But that's just me.

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  • October 20, 2019 at 6:37 am
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    FDM.. all day long, resin printing is a chore…… yes theyre smoother, but certanily does not outweigh the nightmare of resin everywhere…. smell… cost..

    not ror me.

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  • October 20, 2019 at 6:39 am
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    Off-topic but what sort of sweatshirt is he wearing?

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  • October 20, 2019 at 7:10 am
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    your print show traces of overcuring, not sure if it is from the printing or from post-processing of the prints

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  • October 20, 2019 at 9:17 am
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    I think that if your in to Warhammer board strategy/fantasy type games and like painting your own models then a resin printer could be a good idea. But only if you have a garage with an extraction cabinet in it, or some place similar. And for quite a few models you need to purchase a license before you can use them, which is understandable as many hours have gone it to making them and are often a work of art, but is going to add to the cost of their use. Most of the models I've seen in videos still seem pretty soft even when cured. They don't look like a good idea if you intend to make moving parts like gears. Although they're fascinating, I think I'll steer clear of them until they come up wit a non-toxic resin.

    Reply

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