How to get CRISP noiseless videos & photos – in any light and with any camera!

How to get CRISP noiseless videos & photos – in any light and with any camera!


Welcome guys In this video I wanted to show you how you can get clean crisp noiseless photos and videos with any camera So what I’m about to show you literally is going to work with any camera as long as this camera is not a potato, basically. As long as you’re actually able to get normal images. A lot of times people think to get images without any noise you have to have cameras that are able to shoot really high ISOs and that’s actually not the case. You can shoot with pretty much any camera and also, just to illustrate this I don’t want to show you just shots like these ones, which was done at night, but also for example, this scene that I did during the day to show you how if you’re not following the right techniques you can even screw up this kind of a shot. So here for example is this shot where I was just testing out with my brother actually the costumes,
for the sequence that we’re shooting. We’re going to be basically mimicking the look of a film “O Brother Where Art Thou?” which actually has very overexposed you know, very bright look
with a lot of brown tones and as you’ll notice in this shot the shot is just well exposed. I used the histogram
and the built-in light meter in my camera. This, by the way, was shot
on the Panasonic GH4 which is by no means a low light
or a great low light camera. It’s a shot that was done during the day with plenty of light source and so there’s really nothing to worry about but actually, in this case because what I’m trying to replicate is a shot that you see, it kind of looks like this which has very high-key lighting,
very bright. In this case you have to be kind of aware when you’re exposing for a shot like this what you’re going for what is your final look
that you trying to get and that’s, I would say,
the biggest mistake that most people make. Most people just try to get
a well exposed shot you could say and so, they just expose it
without thinking much about what is the final look that they want and in this case because I knew that the final shot is going to be very bright almost overexposed looking it actually made more sense for me
to overexpose the shot a little bit in camera. So here let me actually show you what I’ve shot for the final sequence here with my brother replicating the look of the film “O Brother Where Art Thou?” and as you’ll notice they’re overexposed There are actually exposed
by almost one half step and the reason, like I said,
I did that is because I knew in the final shots I didn’t care about protecting the highlights. What I did care about more was the actual shadows because the shadows and the dark areas of your image is always where the noise is going to be more visible or that’s really where the noise appears. So you got to be very careful when you have any kind of
shadows in your shot. Now, like I said this shot is overly,
it’s just overexposed very high-key lighting. There’s very little shadows but there’s still some shadows there in the back. Now to give my final look, I basically apply this basically color LUT that I created. This is from my new color LUTs. They replicate various famous movie. You can get that, by the way, on my website And anyways, I apply this LUT to my shot,
and you can see this is how we get the final look. So now let me go and apply that same LUT to the original, sort of a test shot that I did where it was just properly exposed. And you can see this is how the shot looks. It’s nice if I just simply apply it like this you don’t necessarily see excessive noise but it definitely does not look like the film “O Brother Where Art Thou?” and the he reason is because here just as a comparison, you’ll notice in this shot it looks a lot brighter and even when you look at here the RGB Parade here you’ll notice that all the information here is basically above the 250% you know, and going basically all into one hundred and even a little bit over 100. Whereas here now looking at our shot that was properly exposed you’ll notice that the information is there’s some obviously in the highlights but nothing in the extreme highlights. Now that’s not the kind of look that I’m going after So, in this case what it simply means is I would have to go here before I applied my final look as always, you just select the shot itself and I’ll go into my basic color correction and I’ll adjust the exposure So I’ll have to increase the exposure, in this case. As I start doing that, you’ll notice here I’m started pulling all the information more in the highlights. So I’m just adding exposure here. So, as I start increasing it, you’ll notice that I’m starting to get the kind of look that’s similar to the look that I got in this shot. But you’ll notice also here there’s not a lot of shadows, for example. That’s because I exposed it on purpose made sure that the shadows were, like I said nice and bright, so that like you see here the shadow under his hat doesn’t look very dramatic because that’s, again, that’s the kind of look that I was going after. Whereas you’ll notice in here those shadows are pretty strong under the hat and that’s because in the original image if I would just kind of show you guys quickly how it looked before. Let me just hide our color grade and then turn off here any adjustment we did to the shot. That’s because the original properly exposed image, which in this case, his skin tones look good and everything the shadows are basically just black here. There is no information there. So once I apply my color grade or actually even before I apply my color grade if I were to just show you what happens when I increase the exposure here in my basic color correction, you’ll notice that I made the whole shot overall bright, but not the shadows because why? Because there’s not much information there. So, then when I apply my final look, it just doesn’t look the same. It’s very contrasting. It definitely doesn’t look like that high-key lighting and so that’s why it’s better to get a lot of that stuff already
in camera while you’re shooting. And so, you should know what’s the final look that you’re going after. Now, one way you could say of fixing this is again with color grading,
and yes you can do that to a point but if you start pushing the image too much you’re going to start noticing a lot more noise in those shadows. And that’s because noise stays in the shadows and noise is actually created by various things. ISO or high ISO,
should I say, in cameras will usually introduce more noise. So the higher the ISO you put up, the more noise is going to be. But another case is just simply the compression, the codec the actual file itself it’s going to have more noise stored in the darker parts of the image. Now this shot, like I said it was exposed the middle of the day on the Panasonic GH4, but I used the lowest possible ISO. So, ISO 200. It’s very clean. So you should say “well” so that I should have no noise in that image. But like I said part of the noise there is has nothing to do with ISO, but actually with the compression. So since this is already a compressed image that was saved to my SD card on my camera Once I bring it into my editing program and I start playing with the colors and, let’s say, in this case I want to brighten up those shadows. If I do it a little bit you might not notice a big difference. If I do it a lot, like in this case that’s more or less the look that I want… Well, you know, if you look at the shot now you’ll notice that it’s going to be more noise there visible in the shot And that’s because all that noise that was there in the shadows is now amplified. I basically made it brighter. It’s definitely a lot more visible If I, for example, zoom in here and you guys see it now zoomed in in the shadows there of the shot. You’ll see it’s a lot more of noise dancing around. So you definitely want to be very careful of how you expose your shots. Exposure is, I would say, key when it comes to getting a nice clean images And to know what kind of exposure you want. It doesn’t matter whether you’re shooting at night scenes, or in daylight. like you see here. You want to know what is the final look that you’re going after. Now, one tip I can give you is you definitely want to stay away from underexposing your image. If you overexpose an image yes, you’re going to clip
some of the highlight information but, at least, you’ll still end up with a clean looking image. If you underexpose your shot even by a little bit you’re really just going to be doing nothing more but introducing a noise that wasn’t there in the first place. What I mean by that is, you know in a shot like this The same example, test I did with my brother and the same, you could say, you know lighting situation, everything is really the same and the same, actually, ISO. I shot this at ISO 200 You’ll notice that now because I underexposed the shot the noise is going to be a lot more visible. So here, let me show you guys. This is the shot If you look at it here on the histogram, definitely now all the information is below 80%. There’s nothing even going past that. And more here in the shadows. And now this shot is only underexposed by half an f-stop which is definitely not a lot. And in many cases you’ll actually see people, they tell you that you should be underexposing
by half an f-stop to protect the highlights. Well, like I’ve said I would much rather worry about the shadows than protecting the highlights because here’s what’s going to happen when I want to take this shot that’s just underexposed by half a f-stop and I try to brighten it up. So, add exposure and you know try to make it look a little bit better like the other shot. But now even if I applied the same color grade like I had before you’ll notice it’s still lots of contrast. The shadows there, under his hat and things like that, look excessively dark. So, in this case, again I’m going to take the shadows and brighten up the shadows. Well, now we’re getting a little bit closer to what we had in our final shot. Well, look what happens, though when I play it. And even more importantly let me zoom in here and look what happens in the shadows when I play it. I basically just amplified the hell out of all that noise that existed in the shadows. And keep in mind this has nothing to do with low light and nothing to do even with ISO or shooting in high ISOs because like I said this image, just like the previous test that I did is still shot at ISO 200. Now, here’s what happens when you’ve underexposed a shot by one f-stop. Once I apply my adjustment here so I increase the exposure and then do the same thing with the shadows brighten those up and you know already you can start seeing before I do my final color grade, this kind of noise there dancing there. But look what happens once I apply my final color grade. Look at all that crazy, crazy noise in there. And it’s definitely visible when I go and zoom in on the shot here and you’ll notice this excessive crazy noise. And this is, like I said just underexposed by one f-stop. But in this case because I know that for my final look I have to push the image even further it’s something that I got to be really, really careful about. If you make the same kind of mistakes but when doing, for example low light scenes then you’re really gonna just screw up your shots and you’re going to make your videos or photos look very amateur. So here are some shots that I got with my wife at night and this is shot with the Panasonic GH4. Again, definitely not a low-light camera as people would say. And it’s shot actually at ISO 3200 which, already many people are saying that you shouldn’t shoot at that ISO with that camera, because it’s excessively noisy. And yes, it’s going to be more noisy definitely, than shooting at ISO 200 but in this case I had to shoot at ISO 3200 to get, basically, the right kind of exposure with the lighting that I had. Now, to get this image looking right what I got to do is I got to add the right kind of contrast. So I’m going to, in this case, I’m just going to apply a LUT which converts standard LOG or V LOG profile into, basically, a REC.709 video So here, just apply it and this is now how this shot looks. So, just to show you what happens here with the histogram this is before this is how the LOG profile looked and definitely, because it’s a shot done at night it’s way underexposed, you could say So, I’ve under-exposed it but it’s properly exposed. What I mean by that is I looked at the scene with my eyes and I knew that in this scene it’s a night scene. I wanted to be mainly basically dark As long as I can see some kind of definition on my wife’s face here then I know that the shot is going to look good. It’s going to feel like it’s night but you’ll still be able to see what you need to see. And like I said, I don’t have to worry about introducing noise in there. So, like I said, I’ve exposed it correctly ISO 3200 my aperture was wide open at f/2.8 and the shutter speed was, basically or the shutter angle was 180 degrees or two times my exposure. which in this case I was shooting 60 frames per second. So for those of you who are doing photography this means that I was shooting at 1/20 second shutter speed And this is the kind of an image that I got. Now, like I said, because I know I’m shooting a night scene I don’t care what happens in those shadows there because I know that at the end of day once I do my color grading all of this stuff is going to be dark. And that’s something you’ve got to keep in mind. So, again, this is the LOG profile very flat looking. Once I apply the LUT to convert it to proper video you’ll see it darkens all of those shadowy areas. And the same thing you can see reflecting here in the waveform. So, because we already darkened the shadows that means that any noise that was visible there in the LOG profile version of this shot, which, it is visible there because, again, it’s a very flat looking image once I apply the LUT and darken those shadows it’s not as visible. So, here’s my second tip that I would give you guys. If you want to minimize the noise in your shots and especially when you’re shooting at night, always keep in mind that at the end of the day in color grading, you want to actually darken your shots a little bit It doesn’t mean you want to darken everything in your shot just definitely the shadows because, if you remember the fact that it’s the shadows that always hold all that noise then when you darken them you’re just going to make them less visible to the eye. If you make them less visible it means there’s going to be less noise in your shot. Now, here’s one thing that I’ve heard many people talk about, which is this whole technique of trying to expose to the right and here’s what I’ll tell you why it’s BS and why I don’t want to always follow that. It’s because if I was shooting this shot here at night and I was trying to expose to the right meaning I was trying to get it brighter than I would want it in the final image Well, in this scene there simply wasn’t enough light. If I did that already, then that means probably I would have to the only way I could do that is by increasing the ISO. If I increase the ISO, I would again just introduce more noise. And if you really increase up the ISO and go really high, like you can do with some cameras these days, then you’re just going to introduce more noise. But it’s going to be so much noise it’s going to be even visible in the highlights. So then, in that case to get rid of that noise means you just got to darken the whole image. So then, what’s the point of basically exposing to the right? As you can see in this shot I didn’t bother exposing to the right. I just exposed it properly, you could say but keeping in mind that I knew a big parts of that image are going to be very dark because just the shadows I’m going to darken. So, that’s where I would give you the third tip Pay attention to your composition and definitely to your lighting contrast because you can have a low light key like in this case my wife is mainly in the shadow but part of her face and part of her shoulder here is lit by, basically, a light that was there from a storefront. And so, because of that even though the front of her face is in the shadow the shot still looks nice. Now, here’s another shot that I got with my wife where I used the exact same camera settings. So, I did not change the f-stop which is f/2.8 or 1/20 s shutter speed because I was shooting at 60 fps and also my ISO is 3200 just like in the previous shot that I showed you Now here, because I was not paying attention to the lighting, and especially the lighting composition you’ll notice that her face is now, basically, most of it is in the kind of darker shadowy areas where it’s just being lit by the ambient light and basically that light that’s coming off the storefront is only there on that little edge of her face. So, what happens to a shot when I start applying the LUTs to convert this from this V LOG flat-looking image to proper video-looking shot. Well, this is what happens. So, it’s definitely, you know, there’s more contrast and because of that you are going to see a little bit more of that noise And why? Because the shot is mainly just shadows and darks Now, here’s what happens if I wanted to make her face more visible. Basically, then I would have to go to my overall basic color correction here and increase the exposure. If I start increasing the exposure you start noticing right away It’s just a big no-no because then, the noise is really visible especially once I zoom in. If I look at this shot here, the previous shot as you can see half of my wife’s face is in the shadow but because the other half actually has some light under it’s just, the shot looks a lot more interesting. And it’s the same kind of lighting scenario all that stuff I kind of shot it from a different angle. Here is another shot where you can see that same point being illustrated. Here’s my wife and she’s basically being, you know, standing against this building that’s, actually, you know, you could say it has some light on there from these fluorescent tubes. And so, because of that all we’re getting is a sense of there’s somebody standing here but you can’t really see their face. Now, here’s what happens when I just simply move the camera a bit more to the right and I tell my wife to rotate her face a little bit more into the light that’s coming in off, off that building. There’s part of her face here that even though it’s kind of lit with low light there’s some information there. What that means now is that I can now bring up just that part that is, basically, has some light in there and because of that it doesn’t have as much noise. What I definitely don’t want to do is bring up the exposure on the shadowy parts of the image because, again that’s where’s the noise. So here in this case, I’m just going to go to my basic color correction. I’ll grab the highlights here and just bring up the highlights a little bit In this case I might even bring down the saturation because, as I do that, the saturation gets really strong. Now, again here’s how the shot looks. It’s definitely a low light shot. It has a lot darks in it It’s very dramatic very low-key lighting. But you can still see what’s actually happening in the shot. And that’s what I mean by using the light contrast because here in this case even though most of our face here is still in the shadow, it’s okay. I’m leaving in the shadow. I’m not trying to brighten up her whole face. I’m keeping that in the shadows, in the dark, and in this case, I could even make the shot look even cleaner by taking the black areas, for example of this shot and just dragging them down, meaning I’m making the black parts of the shot even darker. So if you look at this now it looks even cleaner but you’re still getting a sense here of what’s in the shot because I’m using that background here that again is a little bit brightly lit so that background there is helping us outline my wife’s hair here. Here this part of of the image there’s some light there in the window and it’s also lighting her left side of the face a little bit So because of that it’s a shot that you can still use and even though it’s definitely dark. Now, if you wanted to let’s say and you really cared about showing this part of the face then you should have your actor or your subject rotate fully to where the light is. You basically cannot shoot a low light scene with no light. You you need to have some light You can have a lot of the shot with no light and complete shadows like you see up here but you need some light to create some contrast because if you don’t, and then afterwards you think you can just fix it then what you’re going to do, in fact is just ruin your shot like, for example, like I said, by just pulling up the exposure. You see, now it looks horrible or even if I didn’t do that if I for example, just say I want to brighten up the shadows a little bit Well, if I brighten up the shadows it’s the same thing. Look at all this noise now being introduced. So does that mean that you always have to have your subject’s face at least part of the face, in some light? What if you wanted to get this really low-key kind of a shot where it’s pretty much, you know the light is very minimal on your subject but you still want it to be clear so you can see who’s there but you also don’t want to just increase the exposure of that shot like I did in this first example here where you just brighten the whole face So, can you do that? Well, yes, you can. And here’s actually another shot that I got with my wife where it’s the same location, the same camera settings. I just had her look away from the light so she’s kind of looking out in the street and you’ll notice very much, basically, all of her face is being lit by this ambient light, which is pretty much zero. You can see something there but it’s very faint. So this is how the shot looks when it’s just standard V LOG profile. Once I applied the LUT to convert it to proper color space you’ll notice the whole shot gets drastically darker because like I said the LUT will just increase the contrast in this shot. So, now her face is even darker. But you’ll notice that even though she’s in a very dark lighting you still get a sense and you see, basically, that it’s a woman’s face, because you see the features because you see the outline of that person and that’s because I was very careful how I framed the shot. So, in this case I knew she was going to be darkly lit but I still wanted the audience to be able to make out here that it’s a nose, seeing the lips seeing somebody’s face. So, I placed my wife’s face by adjusting my camera angle against these bright lights our there on the street and that sort of helps with the composition of the shot because, like I said, you can see the outline of the face better. Now, I could still fix this shot a little bit more. Let’s say majority of the shot is in complete darkness so you’re going to see noise there. So I can kind of fix that by actually taking the darks and making them even darker. So I’m adding even more contrast and in this case because now the difference between the dark and the bright is going to be even more, you’ll notice that her face actually is going to be even more visible. I could also take the highlights and just brighten up the highlights. So just bring him up a little bit more and again that’s going to make the shot a little bit better a little bit more visible. Now, one thing I definitely don’t want to do and again I want you to guys to keep that in mind, is you do not want to take an image that’s underexposed, or part of an image that’s underexposed and brighten that up. If anything, you want to darken that more because, like I said, you got to remember that the noise always remains in the darker portions of your shot. So in this case if I take the shadows and I brighten them because, let’s say I want to see my wife’s face more Well, notice how much more noise I’m introducing. And if I just take the whole image and I brighten it up well, then you might as well just say goodbye because it’s definitely a garbage looking shot. So once again, here’s a recap of how you get clean-looking images without any noise. Always first figure out what it is that you’re trying to get. What kind of a look you’re trying to get. If you’re going for, let’s say high-key kind of lighting you want the shot to be very bright well, you should already be shooting with that look in mind. Definitely, don’t want to be shooting at darker than that. If anything, you want to overexpose a little bit. If you’re shooting, for example going for low-key lighting then in that case don’t expose to the right like some people would say. Just expose it properly, knowing that you’re still going to darken it a little bit. But you’re just going to darken the shadowy parts of your image because, again, the noise always stays in the shadowy parts of your shots not in the brighter spots. Now, another big tip I’ll tell you is just because you’re shooting a low-key lighting scene or at night doesn’t mean that you can’t use lights. You always have to use lights. And even in these shots we’re shooting and we’re using available lights that were there on the street but we’re actually using the lighting to our advantage. So, whether we’re having half of the face being exposed or were using the lights to create an outline on our subject So all those things, like the composition and where you place your subject against the light and things like that they all matter. So you want to use the light because if you’re not going to expose your shot properly and you’re just going to get a completely underexposed shot well, keep in mind that in post you want to be darkening that even further. That means that your shot is just going to look like garbage. Whereas if you get a nice low-key lighting shot like this one but you still have some contrast there between the brighter and the darker parts of the image then you can still do a lot with this image in post because you actually have some bright clean parts of your image. And you know it doesn’t mean that you have to be very safe either with the color grade. So like with this shot, for example this was again shot on the Panasonic GH4 and V LOG profile. So here, I’m just going to go and apply some of my other LUTs that I have. And these LUTs are actually, kind of I customized them to work with various different cameras. And I actually have here a set specifically made for V LOG. So, these will work with Panasonic GH4 or GH5 type cameras. So, in this case, let’s say I wanted to go for the kind of, let’s say, Road to Perdition kind of a look. I can apply that and you can see it already, that LUT automatically converts the shot from this LOG profile, and it adds some kind of color grading to this. And because I applied it to my creative tab here I can still kind of decrease the intensity if I don’t like, let’s say it introduces too much contrast. So here I’m going to show you guys this is how it looks before This is how it looks after I apply the LUT. You can see what happens to the the histogram there. And especially if I put at 100%, or I can put it let’s say, at 70 something percent here and I decrease the intensity of the LUT. I can also here go in my basic color correction and I can still make this shot brighter but by just brightening the brighter parts of the image. So, in this case I’ll just take the highlights and just bring those up. And you can see, the shot now looks nice and bright but again you’re not noticing any noise and that’s because there is no noise in the highlights of this shot. It’s only there in the shadows. So you can definitely create a nice kind of effect. And here, let’s just kind of try out some of these other LUTs that I have. We’ll try, let’s say, Sicario You can see, just creating a different kind of look. Let’s say, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Again, different look. Or, for example, Transformers. And another one here Let’s maybe just try Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. You can see, this is the kind of look we’re getting So you can definitely get nice shots in low light that are very clean no noise If you just remember those tips that I mentioned. So anyways, I hope you guys liked this video. If you did, remember to hit that Like button. Hit it as hard as you can and also subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already and while you’re at it, why don’t you just go and visit my website tomantosfilms.com where you can find a whole bunch of other tutorials like these ones that I’ve already put out there, and that I will still be putting on in the future. So, anyways thank you guys and I’ll see you next time when the next video comes out.

100 thoughts on “How to get CRISP noiseless videos & photos – in any light and with any camera!

  • June 6, 2017 at 7:56 am
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    man this gets so confusing at times, i know they say with the Sonya6300 when you shoot in SLog2 or 3 at night to over expose to 2 stops, aand you can get rid of the noise in post by color grading, and from what your saying is expose properly

    Reply
  • June 11, 2017 at 7:32 pm
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    Lol why so many views, it's obvious even from the thumbnail that you have to lower your aperture etc. No thanks I won't watch 30 mins of you stating the obvious

    Reply
  • June 12, 2017 at 5:42 am
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    ETTR and thats it what you are trying to say for a half hour!

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  • June 15, 2017 at 12:53 am
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    what settings should we shoot at night to get the best

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  • June 16, 2017 at 9:45 pm
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    So wht do we gat to do?? we have to open the aperture more or graded high over 100% ??

    Reply
  • June 26, 2017 at 9:19 pm
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    Hello Tom. Sorry to ask a no-brainer but my English is not very good. I do not understand if you recommend overexposing or underexposure in the video to avoid noise. I would also like to know what to do for an overnight shot in the forest (for example). Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge.

    Reply
  • July 21, 2017 at 1:10 pm
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    This is exactly what I was doing, trying to make shadows brighter and got plenty of noise! I was afraid to make dark areas even more darker! Thanks Tom, pozdrowienia dla Ciebie i Lukasza 😀

    Reply
  • July 23, 2017 at 7:19 am
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    Hey Tom Antos I'm really struggling with night video man but I have a lens that's f4 24-70 mm do you think that lens can still make clean night videos ??

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  • July 24, 2017 at 8:31 am
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    Thanks for the helpful explanations!

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  • July 25, 2017 at 6:09 pm
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    When doing STILLS / PHOTOGRAPHY IN RAW, I sometimes under expose so I can keep a faster shutter speed and recover light later. It's easier to deal with noise in photography than blur.

    any thoughts?

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  • August 20, 2017 at 7:04 pm
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    thanks,,,very informative video,,,but still the noise difference between your good and bad exposed night shots are too much to be justified only by "exposure settings"…it seems they have another difference too,,,

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  • August 31, 2017 at 5:50 pm
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    @TomAntos I have a question to ask, I have the regular Canon Rebel T3 DSLR camera that shoot at 720p at 25fps or 30fps, how can I stop my videos from being so grainy? I notice all my footage is so grainy and not sharp & crisp. I am shooting with the lens that came with my Canon Rebel T3 DSLR camera not the T3i Rebel camera. I am also shooting in cinestyle and a c-log picture profiles

    Reply
  • September 6, 2017 at 8:43 pm
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    i've seen a ton of video shooting gh5 v-log at 400 iso and still have a ton of noise in the video

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  • October 4, 2017 at 12:30 am
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    Ooohh that train station :))) do you live in thet area?

    Reply
  • October 29, 2017 at 3:30 pm
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    Wouldn't it an option to use a reflection bouncer to get some environmental light to the subject (if it's a person)? That would fix a lot of dark shadows without bringing additional lamps and such (except for an assistent maybe or extra lightstand).

    Reply
  • November 22, 2017 at 11:15 am
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    you are so noob tom antos

    Reply
  • November 24, 2017 at 10:29 pm
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    You’re a genius Tom! Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. 🤘🏼😃 keep up the great work.

    Reply
  • November 28, 2017 at 11:56 pm
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    i've got problem with my gx80.
    Theres a lot of noise even with good light. Iso is low , theres still much noise.
    Lens : gvario 14-42mm
    I would appreciate it if anyone could help me.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    theres also a big difference between the two shots. the test shot is in hard light wich gives you the strong shadows. it looks like its a little overcast in the second shot wich gives you even light most of the time

    Reply
  • December 1, 2017 at 9:29 pm
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    lol distinctive acting there brother

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  • December 4, 2017 at 2:35 pm
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    Tom, amazing, thank you!

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  • December 5, 2017 at 4:15 pm
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    dude whenever i get high i watch your brother and shit myself laughing. it is so weird i cant stop. I LOVE YOUR BROTHER AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH

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  • December 5, 2017 at 9:46 pm
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    you make my day, well treated, i learnt something new, kudos brother and your beautiful wife…

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  • December 6, 2017 at 10:46 pm
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    Wow Interesting! I was doing it all wrong ^^ i tried it not to exceed the iso 1600 with my gh5 ! A got a question what should i do when you don't have v log? Im using the cinelike d profile with everything all the way down. Any good luts for the lowlight?

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  • December 7, 2017 at 9:59 am
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    What he is saying by dark your shot is, contrast the shot and lower your bright a little? That is why NEAT VIDEO on the loose.

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  • December 10, 2017 at 7:13 pm
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    Very helpful info! Thanks

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  • December 11, 2017 at 12:05 pm
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    Hi. In the first example (when you use your brother to ilustrate) you have 2 TIPES OF LIGHTS, in the final test you have soft light ( and the contrast is not that accentuate resulting less noise because you dont crash the black/shadow) . Aniway, good work. Thanks for sharing your knoledge!

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  • December 13, 2017 at 3:37 pm
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    It's funny how the purpose of the video is to obtain noiseless scenes but most of it actually teaches you how to add more.

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  • December 13, 2017 at 4:45 pm
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    great tips dude! Nice build up! Professional tutorial.

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  • December 13, 2017 at 8:30 pm
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    best video i ever seen i have this noise problem on g7 long time 🙂 thenx a lot!!!!!!!!! <3

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  • December 14, 2017 at 8:08 am
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    ETTR is not for anything but base ISO. Also, Youtube destroyed most of the dark areas of the shots with horrible artifacts.

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  • December 16, 2017 at 3:16 am
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    In the "OBrother" you have to consider what's in the shot when you make the decision for exposer. in this case not clipping his white shirt is much more important then dealing with the shadows which are way in the background and much less prominent. your eyes is focusing on the character moving close to the camera.

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  • December 16, 2017 at 5:17 pm
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    Thank you for that awsome Content!!

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  • December 17, 2017 at 3:11 pm
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    Thank you for the great info, I like how you clearly explain your shots and how you tweak the settings here and there, excellent!

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  • December 17, 2017 at 8:27 pm
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    You would get more option if you grade in resolve though.

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  • December 24, 2017 at 3:26 am
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    what a shoooots!

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  • December 24, 2017 at 1:03 pm
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    really great video. thanks.

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  • January 1, 2018 at 4:35 am
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    This is what i seek in one month, and finally i found nice and great video from you. Congratulations more subscriber for you !

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  • January 9, 2018 at 3:31 am
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    You don"t have to stick to exact 180 degree shutter rules. I like to shoot at higher shutter values when shooting at 60fps especially for slow motion for example, I'll shoot at between 120-160 shutter speed. So 60fps : 1/160. This is especially great for slow motion because the image is sharper, but all things considered, if you are dealing with a situation in this video where you are already pushing the ISO and need all the exposure you need then the lowest shutter speed is suitable.

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  • January 9, 2018 at 3:33 am
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    Crushing the dark areas will help mask the noise. Very nice

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  • January 12, 2018 at 10:25 am
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    Dude you're comparing two completely different lighting conditions!! Your test setup has very different light quality vs the final setup (the sun in the test scene has much sharper shadow qualities). What you're promoting and how you're expressing it is dubious to say the least. Shame on you.

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  • January 13, 2018 at 12:07 am
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    Beautiful. Focused on the quality of my videos this year. Thanks, great video.

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  • January 14, 2018 at 2:29 am
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    wish you did the night shot w/ the GH4 for a better challenge 🙂

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  • January 16, 2018 at 1:57 pm
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    This is a great tutorial, but it's waaay too long, been watching for 2 days now.
    Again, it's great!! <3

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  • January 16, 2018 at 7:15 pm
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    Okay, no matter how much you try to measure light and colour with scopes and graphs, it all comes down to how it looks to the eye, and honestly, all I can think when looking at your final grades is Magic Bullet Looks circa 2012.

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  • January 19, 2018 at 6:46 am
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    even though i am an amateur photographer at 80years old i learned a amazing amount my wildlife videos will be a lot better thank you so much.

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  • January 31, 2018 at 2:54 am
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    Amazing tips, tks for sharing!

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  • January 31, 2018 at 6:40 pm
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    Is it bad that I can’t see any noise AT ALL in these shots? 😂
    They look so pro to me, even unedited.

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  • February 27, 2018 at 6:59 pm
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    i was pro photographer, i consider myself very experienced shooting at night, the true is most of time for a clean look in low light at night we need help of any artificial light that we can have at hand. if only what we have is a cigarette lighter there will be situations that desperately try to use that lighter, normally with little luck, either is true that a f/0.95 aperture lens can take advantage of the light of a cigarette lighter (in a very small area) 🙂 but i agree the cameras differencies are not as big than the light limitations are and a wise compromise is the key of a better success.

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  • March 3, 2018 at 5:14 pm
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    Great tutorial man! Thanks a lot! Greetings from Argentina!!

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  • March 6, 2018 at 6:09 pm
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    Thanks

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  • March 15, 2018 at 1:01 am
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    10 minutes in, and nothing about the topic, ramble much LOL

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  • March 16, 2018 at 5:26 am
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    I’ve been shooting for about a year and was always afraid of shooting in low light because grain. There is not a lot of videos that will explain to darken the shadows and raise the highlights

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  • April 4, 2018 at 12:35 pm
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    Thanks, helped me a lot

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  • April 21, 2018 at 1:05 pm
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    solid video

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  • April 21, 2018 at 5:53 pm
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    Really nice tips, and it makes sense!

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  • May 11, 2018 at 3:04 pm
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    The GH5 is quite a low light camera… I’d like to see the same with a GH4 or a 5D mark ii…

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  • May 12, 2018 at 7:56 am
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    Hey Tom. Loving your videos. Could you do a video on the picture profiles you use in your A6300? And which ones really have the best low light performance?

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  • May 13, 2018 at 7:41 pm
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    shooting in LOG setup could it be helpful?

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  • May 16, 2018 at 1:47 am
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    why do you need to shoot 180 degree for the night shot shooting in slow-mo at 60fps. You're not shooting film so you do not need to worry about advancing film frame while capturing the image. You just shoot at 1/60 and get more exposure and when you play it back at 24fps your individual frames are still seem like 180 or close to it.

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  • May 21, 2018 at 3:48 pm
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    Rename this whole video as "How to film night scenes like John Cassavetes". Love the technique here…

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  • May 22, 2018 at 8:51 pm
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    Awesome information and greatly appreciated!
    My question is, in low light when shooting in like a Cine4 profile(Sony) where it's not as flat as log, should my histogram still look like yours where most of the info is around 50 and below? Thanks!

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  • May 23, 2018 at 6:17 pm
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    this was really cool and super informative! got a new sub

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  • May 26, 2018 at 3:19 am
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    Tom I'm not sure if its me or something in camera but all of my shots seem to have a ton of noise even at 600-800 ISO. I'm shooting with a 18-35 Sigma Art f/1.8 wide open in CineD, NR set to 0. I can't seem to figure this out. All of my shots are really noisy… Any suggestions?

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  • May 27, 2018 at 3:11 am
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    thank you!

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  • May 31, 2018 at 7:05 am
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    Doesn't shooting at 60 fps makes your video darker?

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  • June 6, 2018 at 6:51 am
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    why get rid of all the colors? who wants to watch a brown movie? just shoot in B&W if ur gonna get rid of the color.

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  • June 12, 2018 at 3:31 pm
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    Listen guys, i dont want to beDarthvader but: what is this for explanation? just standart knowledge wich every pro camera operator learns in his second week of assistance. All this YT videos with loud shouting expertise…omg. Do you work as a cameraman? since dslr video my branche is full of artist-supported-by-daddys-money-that-i-dont-hang-on-myPS4

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  • June 12, 2018 at 3:42 pm
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    thanks my role model Tom Antos

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  • June 21, 2018 at 1:21 am
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    UGH! TLDR!

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  • June 22, 2018 at 4:18 pm
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    Great video Tom

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  • June 30, 2018 at 12:17 pm
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    3 mins in ….. i wam lost and confused

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  • July 20, 2018 at 3:02 pm
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    my image looks great when I see it in proxy but when I turn it to optimized it has some noise….do you do your color correction before before lots when you do vlog,what profile would you suggest for night shot

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  • August 2, 2018 at 4:09 am
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    Can I know where to find the LUT

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  • August 4, 2018 at 5:04 am
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    Very good stuff! Learned a lot from it, man.

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  • August 8, 2018 at 6:28 am
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    You must pay your wife a model's fee

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  • August 15, 2018 at 6:17 pm
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    I hit the Like Button so hard I cracked my phone's screen.

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  • August 16, 2018 at 1:47 pm
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    Your video sounded like a simple direct solution but later on sounds like a diploma in video frame rates and that too with a ton of tools and several layers of processing. Ive been NLE editing past 15 years approximately and im befuddled. I think with so many steps and cautions. I might as well just go back and re-shoot the footage in proper light. Or maybe im just a moron. But the video is tooooo long. Just my humble opinion.

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  • August 19, 2018 at 11:42 pm
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    Great explanation of how to expose and light your shots – something I've been thinking about. I'm wondering if you have any examples of the "lower" DSLR cameras (like my 600D/t3i) shooting well exposed short films (with good lighting)?

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  • August 20, 2018 at 2:48 pm
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    QUESTION – I read that the VLOG upgrade should only be used during the day (proper lit shots) because you don’t need that extra dynamic range for night videos? Tom love your videos and channel!!!! So helpful.

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  • August 21, 2018 at 5:00 pm
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    What you mean I can't use my potato to get Crisp Images 😂😂

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  • August 25, 2018 at 5:45 pm
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    Hey sometimes I apply LUTs and they look very unnatural and wrong? With digital artifacting.. but they work for other people.. why is that?

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  • September 11, 2018 at 7:52 pm
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    what advice would you give someone that owns a GoPro and CANNOT GET RID OF THE NOISY FOOTAGE? I shoot with ISO 400 (which is the lowest possible), I light my indoors footage with one diy softbox… And still can't get rid of that damn noise that always appears on my videos.. o.O it's very frustrating! can you help me!??

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  • October 22, 2018 at 11:29 am
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    I was doing exactly opposite what you have mentioned here….As I wondered the noise gets more after post production process of my videos…Now cleared all the doubts..Ton of thanks Tom

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  • November 28, 2018 at 4:12 pm
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    Can u talk about the metering and exposure settings you used?
    My camera allows me Multi, Weighted Center, Average and Spot. For night shots, which do you advise and to where exactly in the image should it be (in case it's Spot metering)?

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  • December 7, 2018 at 10:32 am
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    Very helpful! Do you have any videos like these on white balance?

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  • December 14, 2018 at 6:58 pm
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    3200 ISO is not ANY lighting conditions. And the GH5 is not ANY camera. Granted not many people need to go over that often but the titles such click baity nonesense. None of this is going to help you if god forbid you need to shoot something at 6400 iso on a camera that doesn't shoot at a decent bit rate. You would absolutely not get by with these techniques with say a Canon 500D in comparable lighting conditions, the footage would be unusable.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 12:17 am
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    SUPER HELPFUL FOR ME!!!!! Thank Tom.

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  • January 6, 2019 at 6:02 pm
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    You live in that area ? I’m not too far from that train station small world lol

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  • January 10, 2019 at 2:34 am
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    Really useful
    Thanks Tom

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  • January 16, 2019 at 7:31 pm
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    Excellent tutorial! I really learned a lot from it. The section involving the night footage of your wife was particularly helpful. Are you on LinkedIn? I'd love to connect so that I could re-post your video and give you a shout out. (I'm a videographer based in New York, and I think my fellow videographers could learn a lot from your tutorial.)

    Separately, for what it's worth, I respectfully disagree with the earlier comments to the effect that you should have prioritized the exposure of the white shirt in the "O, Brother" section. I totally understand where people are coming from. However, as I saw it, it was less a matter of avoiding noise in the shadows, and more avoiding the noise that permeated the entire background – a problem you avoided through your methodology. (Then again, I'm hardly an expert in this stuff yet! Just sharing my thoughts . . )

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  • February 1, 2019 at 5:21 am
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    I really enjoy your videos and have watched many, but I don't really see the point of what you are trying to do here. Yes, use ambient if near any and have your subject face the ambient. But I feel you are basically saying underexpose everything to reduce noise. A better plan would be to have someone with an LED panel with diffusion off camera or something to light the subject better.

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  • February 5, 2019 at 6:02 am
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    I watched The Celeveland Show before this… Now all I can see is Tim The Bear giving this tutorial

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  • February 25, 2019 at 12:52 pm
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    This is the only video that talks about this. Videography or photography. Everyone is using apps to reduce noise after the fact but nobody mentiones that while shooting you need to know what you want to get and by exposing exactly how you need it from the start you can get much much more from your camera.

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  • March 18, 2019 at 9:59 pm
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    Thank you so much, I some cases I could almost eliminate noise, in some other cases not, but IQ got much better.

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  • March 31, 2019 at 2:50 pm
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    This is very helpful! Thank you so much Tom!

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  • May 23, 2019 at 7:04 pm
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    Thank you for your content you always put out some of the best video tutorials on the Internet seriously

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  • August 11, 2019 at 5:13 am
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    I always hear “expose to the right always, even in moody dark scenes and then bring it down in post” what this does in my opinion is limits the ability to see what you want right out of camera. However I get worried about underexposing even though it gives me the look I want. What do you think?

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  • August 15, 2019 at 2:07 am
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    This is longer than most "tutorials," but tell you what: This. Is. A. Class. What you don't get from most tutorials is actual critiquing of work, seeing what was wrong with the image and how to fix it with in-depth instruction, and how to do it next time so that you save time. This video has given me a lot to think about how to shoot my next project so that I'm not spending so much time "fixing it in post." Tom Antos, thank you for posting this style of video. Halfway through the video, and I've already learned tons. I will be applying your tips to the music video I just shot this weekend. 🙂

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  • September 1, 2019 at 3:32 pm
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    Thank you, Tom, that was… Very unique and smart. 🙂 (Y)

    Reply

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