How To Compose A Photo (Part 1)

How To Compose A Photo (Part 1)


we’ve had a lot to request from you guys
to tell you more about composition composition is all about lining up the
elements of your image within the camera’s viewfinder so that they line up in a pleasing
interesting dynamic sort of a way. I’m sure most of you have heard of devices such as the rule of thirds, or the rule of diagonals and others to help you with your composition but I
also know that there’s a lot of confusion around well
how do you line up immovable objects within a picture I’m
sitting here right now with a load of beach huts behind me, they’re pretty immovable aren’t they I have an annoying sort of little extra head growing out of my neck which is that tree over there another very immovable object, nwo the obvious thing that most people would do is say mike just move a bit there’s an extra head grwoing out of your neck, well there’s a much much easier way. If you were shooting a candid picture, with somebody gazing off into the distance you don’t want to alert them to
something and you also dont want the thing growing out of their neck, so all you have to do is move yourself just a little bit, so now that annoying tree has moved across the frame so it’s now over here as opposed to growing out of my neck, also the beach huts have realligned themselves slightly, it’s a little more pleasing because there’s a bit more seperation between me and them. Another way you could lose the tree if we just pop it back again for a moment, would be to lower the camera, now before we do it the movement that jayne just did, with the video camera wasn’t a turning and twisting movement like
that it was a physical sideways movement of both herself, and the camera and that is what made those elements move further apart. This is what created a gap between my neck and the tree. The next one could be to lower down to get lower so that the
tree will disappear behind me also the beach huts have pretty much dissapeared aswell and now it’s me against the sky but we’ve now got some foreground stuff
going on in this shot in the shape these little wooden posts, that movement was slightly more complex, as opposed to being a straightforward
sideways or up and down Jayne moved the camera like this as she should have crouched
down to take the picture I’m gonna take one of her so you can see
where she is in relation to me there we go, she also had to lower the camera but tilt it upwards as she did it, so there’s this kinda motion going on. You could also move things like the horizon, now that is a very very very static and solid thing to have in a picture so if you come round this way a little bit Jayne, and as Jayne is keeping the camera on me and moving you can see we’ve also recomposed the picture, I haven’t moved an inch but now there’s no becah huts. it’s just a little bit of a movement, it’s about what eight feet. Now i’ve got the horizon behind me, now the horizon is obviously very immovable indeed, but you can move it around within your picture. by moving that up-and-down motion again you can move that horizon up and down in
the picture all Jayne’s doing is raisng and lowering herself off by i don’t know a couple of feet by bending at the knees and that’s having the effect moving the
horizon around within the picture it really is as
simple as that so more about the tilting kind of
emotion. so am i framed full frame? Here we go, full frame shot of me so now i have a gap at the bottom, which is the shingle and a gap above my head which is the sky. now this tilting movement in that plane
that is all about altering these gaps above and below and either side. Where am i in the view finder Jayne am i in the middle? Pretty much in the middle. okay so by doing a tilt like this, Jayne can move me to one side or the other, so just by making a slight tilt, one way or the other I’m moving from side to side in your
picture note this is that kind of movement this
isn’t a a physical side to side this is a twisty sort of a movement with the camera. if she wants to alter the gap above or below me then that’s an up and down sort of movement like this so right now I’ve got a little tiny bit of shingle below my feet and a fair bit of sky, but by tilting the camera down only a tiny bit only a couple degrees
its reversed those gaps. I’ve now got a much smaller gap at the top and much more below. You have to train yourself to look all aorund the view finder. scan it with your eye. imagine your viewfinder is a picture frame, look all around look at those gaps and
you need to make minute little tweaks and adjustments to the
tilt and the side to side and the up and down planes of your camera to adjust those elements.

42 thoughts on “How To Compose A Photo (Part 1)

  • October 22, 2012 at 10:06 pm
    Permalink

    So many great videos recently. THUMBS UP!

    Reply
  • October 23, 2012 at 10:55 am
    Permalink

    Thanks !!!

    Reply
  • October 23, 2012 at 2:18 pm
    Permalink

    I stumbled upon your videos looking for other photographers videos. I was hooked on your videos after watching my first two finds. They're very informative and I truly enjoy your style and delivery. You take the complex and explain it so it's understandable.

    Thank you

    Reply
  • November 22, 2012 at 9:51 pm
    Permalink

    Such simple dummy stuff ! …….. But so useful ! V interesting, thanks πŸ™‚

    Reply
  • February 7, 2013 at 12:22 pm
    Permalink

    yipee for finding your videos !!!

    Reply
  • February 7, 2013 at 8:21 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you. Please help us make more by sharing them on Facebook and Google plus – and likeing them too. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  • March 21, 2013 at 10:46 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you Mike, I'm so fortunate to find your helpful videos and as the others, I'm hooked on these. Thank you for the complex and easy to understand explaination, You are truly the best of the best, Aline Lim

    Reply
  • March 21, 2013 at 10:52 pm
    Permalink

    I'm 59 years of age, not good at using the computer. Did sign my name but it comes out as my daughter's name instead ( shuxian lim ) ,sorry.
    Aline Lim

    Reply
  • March 24, 2013 at 7:37 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you

    Reply
  • June 2, 2013 at 11:54 pm
    Permalink

    Great presentation in an informative manner and kudos to Jane too.

    Reply
  • June 8, 2013 at 5:33 am
    Permalink

    Thanks for the great videos Mike. Between yours and Philip McCordall's I have a real source of practical plain speak and critical indepth references.
    One request though. You rely upon a number of key regular players in the making of these videos. It would be interesting to know some background on thes players. I have to say Jane is the unsung hero of many of the videos. Can we get her infont of the camera for some video inspired content as I am sure there is a lot to learn there as well.
    Rob

    Reply
  • June 8, 2013 at 10:20 am
    Permalink

    Thank you Rob. That would be an idea – and Jayne has been an unsung hereo as you say. In the 'about us' section on the website there's more info about Jayne and I. Though Jayne has left the business now and gone back to full time TV. Lorna is mow doing the filming. I'm going to make a video about us and what's been going on soon and will bear what you say in mind.

    Reply
  • June 9, 2013 at 10:30 am
    Permalink

    Rob only likes Nikons lol

    Reply
  • June 13, 2013 at 1:01 am
    Permalink

    As usual great instruction — Thanks!!

    Reply
  • June 16, 2013 at 5:43 pm
    Permalink

    Pleasure

    Reply
  • June 30, 2013 at 4:03 pm
    Permalink

    hello Mike,

    As a beginner, what lenses should I have in my bag?

    Thank you

    Reply
  • July 4, 2013 at 12:05 pm
    Permalink

    I suggest a focal range from eighteen to two hundred millimetres, an eighteen to two hundred millimetre super zoom, or perhaps an eighteen to seventy and a seventy to two hundred, go and have a look at our photography FAQ video which will help you. /watch?v=uBQkozxzVUQ

    Reply
  • July 4, 2013 at 12:06 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you:)

    Reply
  • July 4, 2013 at 12:06 pm
    Permalink

    My pleasure:)

    Reply
  • July 4, 2013 at 12:06 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you:)

    Reply
  • July 4, 2013 at 12:07 pm
    Permalink

    My pleasure:-)

    Reply
  • July 4, 2013 at 10:42 pm
    Permalink

    I once knew a photographer who drove himself insane trying to take a close up of the Horizon

    Reply
  • July 5, 2013 at 10:17 am
    Permalink

    It's easy to do, you just need practise

    Reply
  • July 19, 2013 at 6:05 pm
    Permalink

    Great video as always. Sorry to hear about you & Jayne, hope you're both ok.

    Reply
  • July 25, 2013 at 7:57 am
    Permalink

    Thanks Jeff. Stuff happens in life and we are…

    Reply
  • December 13, 2013 at 12:57 am
    Permalink

    These videos are a veritable goldmine for someone making his first tentative steps into the world of photography like me. Thanks Mike.Β 

    Reply
  • December 17, 2013 at 6:37 pm
    Permalink

    There's good work and teaching here. Β When someone is patient, you can be surprised by what you're able to achieve and see by moving around as you work out just what picture you want.
    For those looking for MORE ideas on what to do with your photography and composition, find loads of AMAZING tips and tricks over at www.TrickedOutPhotos.com. Β If you want to expand your photography repertoire, then you need to check it out today to see what it has to offer!

    Reply
  • January 11, 2014 at 1:24 pm
    Permalink

    Hi Mike, I noticed at about the 2:18 mark when you took the photo of your videographer, it seemed to me that you focused on the background first then took the picture of her. Is that what you did? If so, why did you do it like that?

    Reply
  • October 9, 2014 at 7:16 am
    Permalink

    hi mike,thankyou so much for your tuitorials, fantastic,fun, i have struggled to understand other blogs but you sure are a professional in teaching, and now i am beginning to understand my camera,thanks again
    cheers
    Tim

    Reply
  • October 27, 2014 at 10:22 am
    Permalink

    I find these videos Β great for having some quality in my pictures. And they are great because Mike just loves what he is doing and he is very honest to us…
    I just don't understand the dislikes…Β 

    Reply
  • March 3, 2015 at 8:13 pm
    Permalink

    thank you…

    Reply
  • March 17, 2015 at 2:08 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you, this video was very informative.

    Reply
  • October 15, 2015 at 7:31 pm
    Permalink

    i thought it was a "he"

    Reply
  • July 11, 2016 at 12:09 am
    Permalink

    Mike you are such a good teacher. I can't thank you enough for your kind thoughtfulness.

    Reply
  • September 2, 2016 at 8:52 pm
    Permalink

    You can tell me that records video equipment, pure curiosity a follower from Spain, greetings.

    Reply
  • March 3, 2017 at 1:39 am
    Permalink

    Mike, I watch hours and hours of photography tutorials (don't worry I shoot as well haha) and I must say, yours are by far among the best – clear, concise, easy to follow along. Thank you for your free information!

    Reply
  • May 4, 2017 at 3:24 pm
    Permalink

    can you please make a dedicated video for all the rules that exist in photography πŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒπŸ˜ƒ

    Reply
  • March 25, 2018 at 5:44 pm
    Permalink

    sorry, what? How does one move an immovable object in the frame? Well, perhaps I am really thick, but the only way I know how to do that is move my own self around. How else does one change the look of a frame?

    Reply
  • October 18, 2018 at 11:17 am
    Permalink

    i rember when i watched his first video.. then i starting continue to watche his all videos..

    Reply
  • December 22, 2018 at 8:14 pm
    Permalink

    That is also known as creative control

    Reply
  • March 12, 2019 at 6:36 am
    Permalink

    i find your videos very informative love your stuff.

    Reply
  • August 10, 2019 at 4:52 pm
    Permalink

    Mikes tutorial videos are beyond a shadow of a doubt the best out there, no question.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *