Fierce Women of Art | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios

Fierce Women of Art | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios


This year the
anonymous group of women who call themselves
the Guerrilla Girls are celebrating their
30th anniversary of questioning and disrupting
art world practices, asking important questions
about whose work gets seen in art institutions and why. In 1985, the Guerrilla Girls
put out this public service message, calling attention
to the paucity of solo shows by women artists in
New York’s art museums. And this year, they
updated this list, showing only modest improvement. There’s still deeply
entrenched discrimination across the board in
arts institutions, and the Guerrilla
Girls have been steadfast in calling it out. I have tremendous
respect for what they do. And for me, they
fall into a category of truly inspirational
artists who take risks, are supremely
awesome, unapologetic, and who happen to be women. I’m going to call them
Fierce Women of Art. They make a wide range
of work, and we’re only going to touch on a tiny
portion of it today. But I feel the need to
single out and celebrate some of the most inspirationally
brazen women who’ve made art in the last several decades. Today, I’m going to
talk about five of them. First up, the aforementioned
Guerrilla Girls. This art collective got
together after the Museum of Modern Art in New York had
a survey exhibition in 1984 of what they considered
to be the most important art of the time. Out of 169 artists,
only 13 were women. And all the artists were white
and from Europe or the US. Picketing was organized
outside the museum, but it seemed to make no
impression on visitors. So they decided to try
some different tactics. The group made posters
and stickers to plaster around the city that displayed
cold, hard statistics demonstrating that unambiguous
gender imbalance in museums and galleries. In 1989, they conducted what
they call a weenie count at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art. They compared the number of
nude males to nude females in the art on display. They shared their results
on a billboard made through the Public Art Fund
and updated their findings in 2005 and 2012. Their efforts extend
beyond gender concerns. And their work has
also brought attention to racial inequality in
the art world and beyond. Playing upon the
word “guerrilla”– as in freedom fighter–
and its homonym “gorilla”– the animal– the group members
wear masks when in public, each choosing the name of a
woman artist of the past to go by. It injects humor
in their activism but also works to protect
their individual careers. And as founding member
Frida Kahlo once said, “If you’re in a situation where
you’re a little afraid to speak up, put a mask on. You won’t believe what
comes out of your mouth.” As their statistics
continue to show, this is an issue that
has not gone away– making their work of using,
quote, “facts, humor, and fake fur to
embarrass and transform the powers that be as relevant
and important as ever.” Corita Kent was a sister of
the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles and taught
art in the 1950s and ’60s at Immaculate Heart College. During that time she forged her
own printmaking aesthetic while also inspiring and opening the
minds of her students, peers, and scads of others. Even before Warhol,
Sister Corita was experimenting with silk
screening and iconography of advertising. She made posters,
serigraphs, banners, and murals that combined her
interest in faith, literature, and activism– creating
dynamic, powerful images that asked the critical
questions of her time. Her work was highly political,
addressing the Vietnam War and civil rights. And her banners and
posters could often be seen at rallies
in the ’60s and ’70s. She left the order
in 1968, but remained a member of the Catholic
church and continued making work until her death. Her brand of activism was bold
and unflinching, but wholly positive and inclusive. Rare is the figure who
can inspire and engage such wide audiences and
present a kind of idealism that is intelligent and unrelenting. Lynda Benglis came to the
fore in the late 1960s with her poured pieces, hybrids
of painting and sculpture made by her pouring latex and
foam directly onto the floor. These bright, bold,
and central works one-upped the gestures of
the abstract expressionists and also ran counter
to the rigid minimalism that was currently
reigning supreme. But she became famous not
just for her pioneering work but also for a legendary ad
she put in the November 1974 issue of “Artforum” magazine. Before that, she’d already
begun to cheekily reference the male domination
of the art world by including a
picture of herself as a child wearing a
traditional Greek boys costume on her announcement
card for a 1973 exhibition. Then in April of
’74, you see her in an ad in “Artforum”
for another show, wearing aviators and leaning
against her silver Porsche. A card announcing her show
at Paula Cooper Gallery in May of ’74 includes
this photograph of Benglis taken
by Annie Leibovitz. But the real kicker was
the November “Artforum” ad which she purchased herself,
called a centerfold, and considered a work of art. It included an unforgettable
photograph of Benglis nude, holding a large double-headed
dildo between her legs. Google it. The image was shocking
and hugely divisive, causing resignations from
two of the magazine’s editors who considered it pornographic. Love it or hate it,
the picture made fun of the machismo
of the art and artists who ruled the market, while
also subverting the male gaze. Benglis owned it. And for me, this
image represents her absolutely taking command
of her sexuality, her career, and her public image. The controversy has
abated, but the picture is still remarkably
powerful– although difficult to find in libraries
due to theft. For many artists, this kind
of act could subsume a career. But Benglis has continued to
make ever-new and innovative work throughout her career. Her decades-long exploration
of biomorphism and materiality has earned her
enormous influence, and the impact of her
work is strong today. In 1989, the National
Gallery of Art in Beijing hosted a show called
“China Avant-Garde”, which was the
country’s first ever, government-sponsored
exhibition of experimental art. The show opened on
February 5 at 9:00 AM and was closed down by
3:00 PM on the same day after one of the artists
whose work was included in the show, Xiao Lu,
walked into the galleries, took out a pellet gun,
and fired two shots into her installation. Made in collaboration
with the artist Tang Song, the piece consisted of
two telephone booths with a male figure in one, a
female figure in the other, and a red telephone dangling
off its receiver in between. Titled “Dialogue”, the piece was
clearly about a lack thereof. And Xiao Lu’s performative
act of shooting on it, while she claimed it was
personal and not politically motivated, resounded strongly
as an act of rebellion at a time, post-cultural
revolution, when the government
was just beginning to loosen its control and
censorship of artistic output. She was lauded as a hero of the
cultural and political vanguard just as tensions were rising
toward the pro-democracy demonstrations and
subsequent massacre that would take place in Tiananmen
Square just months later. Few if any other
women artists in China have achieved this
kind of a notoriety, even as the market for
contemporary Chinese art has expanded and provided
international platforms for a number of male
artists from China. Xiao Lu has continued
to make work since 1989, although with considerably
less attention– exploring controversial
issues through works like “Sperm”, which documents
her quest for a sperm donor and a doctor who would
artificially inseminate her as well as her ultimate failure. Another work titled “Wedding”
documents her performance of marrying herself– arriving
by a coffin in a wedding gown, slipping rings onto both ring
fingers, and releasing a dove. Xiao Lu’s brand of activism
is intensely personal but resonates strongly
within a culture constrained by censorship
and largely dominated by men. Kara Walker burst
onto the New York art scene in the mid-1990s
with her installations of large-scale, cut-paper
silhouettes that bring to life imagined narratives of the
pre-Civil War American South. Her characters and
scenery represent exaggerated stereotypes drawn
from historical depictions of the time, presenting
grotesque and violent tableaus of plantation life. Her diverse body
of work expanded to include drawing, painting,
projection, and video. But her focus and
work has remained steadfastly trained on
histories of slavery; discrimination; and
what she has called her ever-present,
never-ending war with race. In 2014, Walker created
her largest work to date, call “A Subtlety” in a former
sugar factory in Brooklyn. Within the space, she installed
a colossal sphinx-like female sculpture coated in
sugar, surrounded by smaller molasses-coated
figures of little boys carrying bananas and baskets. Its subtitle tells
you all you need to know– “the Marvelous
Sugar Baby, an Homage to the unpaid and overworked
Artisans who have refined our Sweet from the to the
Kitchens of the New World on the Occasion of the
demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant”. It’s Walker’s unsubtlety in
many cases that captivates us. Recapitulating painful
stereotypes in order to critique them. Her works are deliberately
provocative and often difficult to look at,
but they effectively get at the very worst
of America’s past as well as its present. Walker’s work reminds
me again and again of that Faulkner line.
“The past isn’t dead. It isn’t even past.” Her work is a stalwart
testimony to that. There are many more artists I
admire regardless of gender. And I’m definitely
aware that there are other disparities
in the art world that prevent artists
from rising to the top. But who are the fierce
artists you admire? Let’s talk about
it in the comments.

100 thoughts on “Fierce Women of Art | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios

  • November 13, 2015 at 4:34 pm
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    I enjoy all the art assignment videos, but I LOVED this one! I never comment on YouTube (like…never), but this was informative, educational, and super interesting. Would love more videos about contemporary artists (of all genders) and their work!

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  • November 13, 2015 at 4:36 pm
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    Zaha Hadid

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  • November 13, 2015 at 6:52 pm
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    @Kailey Richards Well, I'd say the first part is because of deeply engrained (and often unconscious) misogyny, and the second part is because of the first part.

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  • November 13, 2015 at 7:33 pm
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    We were just discussing the topic of female artist in my 20th century art class. Our professor gave us an assignment to write a paper a female artist. I wrote about Tova Jansson.

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  • November 13, 2015 at 8:41 pm
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    Marina Abramovic for sure!!!

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  • November 13, 2015 at 8:47 pm
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    thank you so much for this, learned loads!

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  • November 13, 2015 at 11:57 pm
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    I saw Kara Walker's "Camptown Ladies" at the 30 Americans exhibit in detroit last week. I walked into the gallery, it was the first thing I saw, and I was like "I KNOW THIS ARTIST" and I got really happy and excited with this recognition until I remembered what her work was about. I didn't know her work was there, so I was really surprised. xD

    You should make something about Artemisia Gentileschi because she was a badass. Also, I think she was one of the best painters of women for her time. She was a woman and had firsthand knowledge about female anatomy, and she was able to use nude female models, and that allowed her to be more accurate. And just the way she painted women was full of emotion. Her women are not objects, they are characters in their own stories with agency. I really like her Maddona and Child, it was quite different than most paintings like that. It was a real interaction between mother and child, not some idealised holy image. And Jesus actually looked like a real baby, and her being a mother and interacting with children more than a male artist of the time would also helped her draw them. I think she had an advantage and a lot of men were angry about it. They knew how good she was, and one of them even stole her work.

    It's cool to see more contemporary artists, too.

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  • November 14, 2015 at 12:50 am
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    I love the Guerrilla Girls! I attended a workshop of theirs at Columbia College in Chicago a few years ago and got a lot out of it.

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  • November 14, 2015 at 7:01 am
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    There's a bunch of rad women artists in the digital arts world. I know you're not super into digital arts but it's going to important eventually.

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  • November 14, 2015 at 9:35 am
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    I have learned recently that a painting was sold with $170 million (“Reclining Nude” by Amedo Modigliani) and I could't help thinking how some or most artists struggle and how much good all those money could do (like helping young artist or promoting arts to children, etc). Is it fair to put so much value on a single piece of art when the artist is not even alive any more? Is a piece of art (any piece of art) worth that much or is it just snobbism? (I mean, I'm sure any artist would be content with just $ 70 million, right?)

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  • November 14, 2015 at 4:43 pm
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    LOVE this

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  • November 14, 2015 at 5:36 pm
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    This was wonderful! More artistic ladies please. Every story you shared was so inspiring.

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  • November 14, 2015 at 9:17 pm
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    Corita Kent sounds like a badass and I had never heard of her before. Off to Google to do more research!

    edit: Yesssss Kara Walker!!

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  • November 14, 2015 at 9:43 pm
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    Hei, I am passionate artist, and I would like to call myself an Art Creator. If you could please take a look at my facebook page, and leave a feedback on my work, that would really help me.
    https://www.facebook.com/Mica-413530565523417/
    https://www.youcaring.com/mica-459273
    My paintings are all about feelings. Ever since I was little, I was an introvert, and when I discovered that through paintings I could express what I feel, I knew that this is what I want to do and that I needed to follow my pattern. Mica.

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  • November 15, 2015 at 12:29 am
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    Jay DeFeo – Alice Neel

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  • November 15, 2015 at 5:13 am
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    Yayoi Kusama is my hero.

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  • November 15, 2015 at 6:26 pm
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    Oh man, I really loved this episode! I work for a company called Museum Hack and we just developed a tour called the Badass Bitches of the Met, where we talk about women artists and their stories. My favorite woman artist right now is Camille Claudel, who an art critic described as "a revolt against nature: a woman genius." She worked with Rodin, created parts of his famous sculptures, never received credit in her life, and was buried in a communal grave after 30 years of confinement in a mental institution. She was a true badass and everyone deserves to know her story. #remembercamille

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  • November 15, 2015 at 6:28 pm
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    I'm writing about it on my master degree, my list would include candy Sherman, sophie calle, Elina brotherus, Cristina salgado, lygia Clark…

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  • November 15, 2015 at 6:51 pm
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    I googled it. Yowza.

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  • November 15, 2015 at 7:08 pm
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    Female artists that I admire, hmm? Well, I'm a nerd, and I get exposed to a lot of fantasy and science fiction art, for things like card games, RPGs, video games, and so on. The world of fantasy/scifi art is kind of abysmal. It tends to be formulaic and follow certain trends, making piece after piece look samey and boring. And, of course, the male gaze is ASTOUNDINGLY bad. So, in this hostile, trend-dominated world, the artists Terese Nielsen and Rebecca Guay stand out. I love how they bring a little more impressionism, a little simplicity, and (of course) a little accurate female anatomy to a world full of angular, overly-detailed, "realistic" (a weird word for fantasy art) art.

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  • November 16, 2015 at 9:06 am
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    I love it when you make this kind of videos, they're so interesting, easy to watch and very informative.
    The topic of this video is particularly helpful because it's info I never got when I was in school, my teachers seemed to think there was no Modern Art after Andy Warhol, when in fact there's so much stuff we could be admiring and learning about!

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  • November 16, 2015 at 11:27 am
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    Nice video! But a little bit fast, sometimes; I have to watch it again!

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  • November 17, 2015 at 6:17 pm
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    Frida is nothing but amazing. Love to see more about the guerrilla girls too!

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  • November 18, 2015 at 9:41 am
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    Amanda Palmer. Look up her song "Dear Daily Mail."

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  • November 18, 2015 at 8:15 pm
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    I'd add Louise Bourgeois to this list! And… this seems like a perfect "The Art Assignment" for an assignment. Would love to see Micol Hebron here for a Gallery Tally poster assignment to follow up : http://www.hyperallergic.com/117065/tallying-art-word-inequality-one-gallery-at-a-time/

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  • November 20, 2015 at 1:50 am
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    Barbara Aubin was my first inspiration when I began creating art in Chicago. But this is a short list of artists I referred to while teaching. For various reasons they inspired and continue to inspire my work: Artemisia Gentileschi & Kara Walker (already mentioned) and, in no particular order Magdalena Abakonowicz, Remedies Varo, Elizabeth Layton, Kathe Kollwitz, Georgia O'Keeffe, Tamara DeLempicka, Julia Margaret Cameraon, Kay Sage, Elizabeth Catlett, Carrie Mae Weems, and particularly Claire Zielser & Frida Kahlo

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  • November 20, 2015 at 11:44 am
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    Very insightful, thank you!

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  • November 20, 2015 at 10:59 pm
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    I supremely admire Peaches – the artist and musician. I saw her perform in Salt Lake City last week and have been riding the inspiration high ever since. Her creative expression is sexual, powerful, and honest in a way that creates a safe space for listeners and concert goers to explore (unfortunately) taboo topics. I'll never forget the happiness I felt while chanting, fist in the air with a huge grin on my face, "WHOSE JIZZ IS THIS?!" with hundreds of other people. All positivity, embracing the body and healthy sexuality in all ways.

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  • November 21, 2015 at 12:12 am
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    Love, love, love this. I was so ignorant about this issue.

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  • November 21, 2015 at 11:37 am
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    The biggest problem I find with the lack of representation of women artists, is the effect on future generations. I teach art mostly to young women, yet most of the textbooks focus on what men have made. The work is great, but you wonder how inspiring it is when all the most famous work shows only a male perspective. I'm working on a list of greatest women artists, which may be ready to publish in a year or so. For now, my top ten list is: Kathe Kollwitz, Alyssa Monks, Coco Chanel, Amy Lind, Julie Dillon, Terry Strickland, Elizabeth Thompson Butler, Rose Frantzen, Marina Bychkova, and Elin Danielson-Gambogi. But there are still hundreds more artists I need to consider.

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  • November 21, 2015 at 11:18 pm
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    All jealousy aside, I'd love to see a video about your career path or about unusual career paths in the arts.

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  • November 22, 2015 at 2:18 pm
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    I hope there are more of these videos coming in the future! I'll definitely be looking into the work of those you've mentioned here.

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  • November 23, 2015 at 4:40 am
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    this is one of my fav Art Assignment clips so far. Thankyou Sarah 😊

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  • November 23, 2015 at 6:04 am
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    Louise Bourgeois is one of my favorites 🙂

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  • December 5, 2015 at 3:33 am
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    very cool

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  • December 20, 2015 at 9:20 pm
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    Let's not forget Hannah Wilke!

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  • December 23, 2015 at 12:00 am
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    I think people forget that we are classified as humans and not a gender.

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  • January 2, 2016 at 2:55 pm
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    The Andy Warhol Museum did a fantastic exhibition of Corita Kent's work!

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  • January 18, 2016 at 6:01 am
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    This was really cool and inspiring! Could you a part two?

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  • January 28, 2016 at 5:27 am
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    I love faith ringgold. Her art is filled with lovely city life and family oriented drawings that she puts on quilts. It's incredible!

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  • February 4, 2016 at 1:25 am
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    I think Marina Abramovic and Judy Chicago are both awesome, contemporary Fierce Women of Art, but to go more classical, I agree wholeheartedly with one of the other commenters who mentioned Artemisia Gentileschi! She's absolutely phenomenal.

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  • February 5, 2016 at 12:59 am
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    I love Lee Krasner and Alice Neel, I love louise Bourgous and Louise Nevelson, Mary Casatt and all the other underscovered women of art centuries old.

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  • February 12, 2016 at 1:44 am
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    rob gonsalves optical illusions paintings are beautiful

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  • February 20, 2016 at 2:40 am
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    JENNY HOLZER

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  • February 20, 2016 at 2:44 am
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    Mary Kelly ….And I'm delighted that Corita was your first named artist.

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  • February 20, 2016 at 10:03 pm
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    I think one of the biggest problems in art is that so many people who buy art are just looking for an investment. And that means the same art goes up in value because it already has a proven track record of financial pay off. The same Van Goghs and Renoirs get trotted out every decade or so and break new records of millions paid for a painting. That idea of art being a investment portfolio means new art get stifled and left off the gallery wall because the purchasers are primarily looking for it's financial viability. I had a show and wanted to just put a large blown up bearer bond.

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  • February 21, 2016 at 8:46 am
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    I have a lot of admiration for Judy Baca.
    The Denver International Airport wanted a mural that wouldn't offend anyone and that came in panels so it could be taken down if need be. The idea was "Hire a Mexican to do a job other Americans don't want to do."
    She thrived in the face of adversity.

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  • March 17, 2016 at 1:13 pm
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    Theaster Gates and Rick Lowe for their beautiful social work as artists

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  • March 25, 2016 at 6:52 am
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    I love so many female artists, but the main ones who come to mind at the moment are Gabriele Münter, Jenny Holzer and Barbara Kruger. <3

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  • March 26, 2016 at 4:34 pm
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    Who is this speaker? I love listening to her. She doesn't use that weak female uplift thing. It's so confusing to hear people make declarative statements and then pretend it has a question mark at the end. She never even used the filler, "like" or "so" to pad her sentences. She's a model of great speaking, confidence, and so easy to learn from. THANK YOU.

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  • May 2, 2016 at 5:39 pm
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    learned about Xiao Lu here. Thanks for a great cross section of women artists. It can be disheartening seeing that not much has changed since the Guerrilla Girls inception, but videos like this help spread the message of the inequality in the art world.

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  • May 4, 2016 at 11:24 am
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    the most fierce artist I know is MOAL, I saw his work in Miami, Know as half-Man, half-Ape king of the urban jungle. see is work on Instagram  under moalart

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  • May 13, 2016 at 11:20 am
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    "Out of 169 artists only 13 were women and all the artists were white and from Europe or the US". This isn't true. First of all there were 165 artists. Secondly, not all of the artists were white (Jean-Michel Basquiat was represented – you even showed his work at 1:08). Also, 6 artists from Australia were represented, as well as General Idea and Robert Adrian from Canada, and Anish Kapoor from India.

    https://www.moma.org/momaorg/shared/pdfs/docs/press_archives/6071/releases/MOMA_1984_0007_7.pdf?2010

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  • May 21, 2016 at 8:01 pm
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    I have seen Walkers work at the Menil in Houston! <3

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  • May 28, 2016 at 1:49 pm
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    I mean they're a band called G.L.O.S.S (girls living outside societies shit) they play very loud punk music. (to my knowledge) they're all transgender, late last year, another hardcore band were being very disrespectful to them publicly on twitter. The punk scene on twitter really warmed my heart by embracing GLOSS. Truly why i love everything punk. I love gloss for freely being who they're despite the current state of things. and i love the idea that punk is really about that freedom, to do whatever you want, be whoever you want.
    The douche band actually got dropped from their label the day after haha

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  • June 6, 2016 at 3:53 am
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    Did you not include the picture of Benglis, instead instructing us to Google it, because it is perceived by some to be pornographic, because it is expensive to use in a video, or for other reasons?

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  • July 11, 2016 at 3:09 am
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    louise nevelson!

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  • July 26, 2016 at 8:05 pm
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    Please do more than two of these!

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  • August 19, 2016 at 1:23 pm
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    This video is amazing 🙂
    Let me know if you want spanish subtitles to work on them.

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  • August 26, 2016 at 6:34 pm
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    Fierce Women of Art part 1 and 2 is the reason I subscribed to this channel today. I would love to see more segments on women artists. There are so many amazingly talented FIERCE women artists out there from the past and present that deserve recognition for the works they have and some currently are creating. Women artists are still trying to break that glass ceiling, still fighting as equally talented artists to their male counterparts to exhibit in galleries, museums, work in academic college/university art departments, run non-profits, etc. Video segments like Fierce Women inspires female artists to keep creating. I ask that you expand this series and continue with more Fierce women of Art segments.

    You mentioned an interest in viewers adding women artists to your list. I have attached 7 interesting choices that you may find of interest. Although there were hundreds to choose from I contained myself and kept it at 7. But remember, with hundreds of great women artists to choose from…… you could expand this Fierce Women of Art series through the addition of multiple additional short video segments, 5 artists each.

    1. Magdalena Abakanowicz: Polish-Russian female artist known for her large scale sculptures entitled; Backs, Red Abakan, and Bronze Crowd.

    2. Ana Mendieta: Cuban-American female Eco-artist. She utilizes her own body in her creative practice. She is known for her "Earth-body" sculptural, photographic and video works.

    3. Diane Arbus: American Photographer. She ended her 10 year career working for and with her husband in the fashion industry, leaving the business and her husband to find her own creative voice within her photography. Arbus was always in search of "The TRUTH", that little something hidden away from others. She photographed what society at that time preferred to keep hidden. Her work reminds me of an old saying "The eyes are the windows to the soul". Through the eyes of her subjects you get a hint at the secrets revealed in Arbus's photographs. She is known for her 'Freaks' series and her Time Magazine image entitled; Family.

    4. Barbara Kruger: American Conceptual Artist. Her creative practice encompassed black and white photography and reminiscent of her design background, very bold text and statements. Kruger studied with Diane Arbus in design school.

    5. Marina Abramovic: Time based, immaterial, Yugoslavian, performance artist, currently from New York. Her work is unique, intriguing, inspiring and thought provoking.

    6. Janine Antoni: Performance Artist. Antoni utilizes her whole body or parts of her body in her creative practice. Best known for her creative pieces; Gnaw and Loving Care. Gnaw, she chewed chocolate and lard in her perfomance, leaving gnaw marks where she had torn at the blocks with her teeth taking bites, this intense type of performance art brought about damage and pain to her body. She developed sores in her mouth during and after Gnaw. Loving Care, Antonie mopped gallery floors with her own hair while on her hands and knees, dipping her hair into hair dye.

    7. Louise Bourgeois: Wow! What can I say about this amazing artist and amazing woman! She was and is the inspiration and influence of many female artists past and present. Known as a sculptor/installation artist.

    I hope you, The Artist Assignment, and all the viewers here enjoy this list.

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  • September 15, 2016 at 3:08 pm
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    The Art Assignment has the nicest comment sections!

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  • October 20, 2016 at 11:51 pm
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    Please do more!

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  • October 23, 2016 at 9:37 am
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    very informative. great video.

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  • October 24, 2016 at 2:36 am
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    Every art work by a woman is like totally awesome.

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  • April 25, 2017 at 3:46 pm
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    Barbara Kruger e Cindy Scherman

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  • May 27, 2017 at 10:17 am
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    googled it! 😯

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  • July 13, 2017 at 5:11 am
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    I'm sorry was the last sentence apologetic? 🙂 🙂 Great series I'm addicted.

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  • August 9, 2017 at 5:24 pm
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    Florence Seymour was the President of the FFA in Florida. She painted in Florida for 70 years. She started in the 1930's. She was born in 1904. Search for her on Pinterest. She also has a book on a blog called Art Have Fun.

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  • August 17, 2017 at 10:13 am
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    Pussy Riot, Miss Van, and Bjork are the first that come to mind.

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  • August 20, 2017 at 9:16 pm
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    Can't believe I just stumbled upon this video! Love the art assignment and these selections of inspiring artists! Thank you.

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  • August 23, 2017 at 10:29 am
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    google it! x)

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  • September 13, 2017 at 4:06 am
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    Amazing video. Your videos are amazing.

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  • October 14, 2017 at 11:05 pm
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    "It included an unforgettable photograph of Benglis nude, holding a large, double-headed dildo between her thighs. Google it."
    I'm not gonna lie, I almost forgot we were on YouTube for a sec and was expecting you to show the photo. A humorous moment, however it is one that looks negatively on YouTube's often puritanical approach to 'ad-friendly content'.

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  • October 20, 2017 at 10:32 pm
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    Preach! You touched on so many good artists!

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  • November 17, 2017 at 7:04 pm
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    Thanks so much xo

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  • December 7, 2017 at 2:38 pm
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    Kathe Kollwitz ❤️

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  • January 8, 2018 at 5:03 am
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    I freaking love Meredith Monk. She is a multidisciplinary artist, and has phenomenal music, theater pieces, films, etc. You should do a video about her!

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  • March 3, 2018 at 2:30 pm
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    One artist i really love is greer labkten she's a transgender artist who is relatively less well know but i love her work its so emotional and loose

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  • March 5, 2018 at 9:28 pm
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    I really like the placement of the liquor bottle. Makes an art statement.

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  • April 24, 2018 at 11:34 pm
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    Great video! I came across it while researching for a panel discussion I'm moderating with 3 fearless women artists: Juliana Coles, Jennie Ottinger and Sara Zielinski.

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  • June 1, 2018 at 6:10 pm
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    Ana Mendieta is a fierce Cuban American performance artist who worked in the 70s and 80s!

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  • July 19, 2018 at 5:43 pm
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    Great episode! I'm adding to mentions below Karen Findlay, Carolee Schneeman, Eva Hesse, Yoko Ono, Allison Knowles, Artemisia Gentelischi, Tracey Emin, Annie Sprinkle, Catherine Opie…oh, so much cool work.

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  • October 10, 2018 at 11:15 pm
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    Is anybody else just taking a class and doesn't really give a fuck.

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  • October 18, 2018 at 2:35 pm
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    Lee Krasner, Johanna Householder and Lillian Allan. I love all three of these, and of course they don’t even scratch the surface of female artist unacknowledged.

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  • November 6, 2018 at 10:56 am
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    Excellent. Thank you.

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  • December 13, 2018 at 4:20 am
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    Art is gender specific during an age of repression. Many women decline from true feelings to get a show. I make what I want and sponsor myself, rejecting sponsorship that declines my vision.

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  • December 14, 2018 at 8:39 pm
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    I'll throw my wooden shoe into this, knowing full well that there will be grinding machinery and howls of protest… ahem… Georgia O'Keeffe. Like her or not, she influenced so many women because she painted her way, not someone else's. Her work is brilliant. Her story is inspiring.

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  • December 14, 2018 at 8:45 pm
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    1972 Womanhouse installation blew my mind AND 10,000 people visited. They have a wiki page and other resources. If you're into feminist art or just curious, check it out. The Dinner Table was and is significant, but the raw power of Womanhouse still informs us today.

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  • January 18, 2019 at 8:39 am
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    Wish Amrita Shergill could have been included in the list.

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  • January 22, 2019 at 2:46 am
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    Interesting for you not to mention Leonor Fini!!! She was vary…….your type……

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  • February 18, 2019 at 8:16 am
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    Great video! An artist that I deeply admire would be "Amrita Shergil" She was fierce, extremely talented and happenned to be woman.

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  • March 16, 2019 at 6:59 am
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    More, more, more of this series please!!! Bridget Bate Tichenor, Stella Snead, and Fede Galizia

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  • April 8, 2019 at 9:36 am
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    And where is Toyen?

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  • April 20, 2019 at 3:07 pm
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    what is the music …. I love it

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  • April 22, 2019 at 9:44 pm
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    Female artists should understand that the fine art community is run by vain gay old men. They don't want anybody who's not a vain gay old man. Start a women's museum. Stick it to them.

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  • May 11, 2019 at 5:13 am
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    Thank you for doing this!!!💜💜💜💜

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  • May 12, 2019 at 5:10 pm
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    Tania Bruguera for sure!

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  • May 27, 2019 at 7:48 am
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    Besides these fierce women there are also artist like Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, more in mainstream of her time, being quite successful, making calm nd beautiful portraits or impressionist Berthe Morisot with wonderful depiction of motherhood and women's intimacy. I feel it is easy to forget about these artist with feminist approach. Both are very popular in France. 🙂 You will find their paitings in many galleries, palaces and museums.

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  • May 30, 2019 at 3:09 am
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    I have a nominee for the third iteration of this list: her name is Taylah and all you need to know is that she's amazing and awesome and more than deserves it

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  • July 3, 2019 at 9:42 pm
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    Kay 👏🏼 Sage 👏🏼

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