Best Digital Photo Printing PT.2

Best Digital Photo Printing PT.2


I want to get in here a bit Here we go – I want to get my verticals straight Line that up and get a bit of a reflection of
the boat some sky splendid that’ll work nicely! so what we have to do next is to send
it off for printing Let’s look at the ‘pro’ labs first. so i’m gonna take this – in here! And because they’re so big and they have
branches everywhere I’m going to take it in here as well. the results are in we got the prints back and I’ve got a pen and put a little mark in the top left hand
non-political marking the top left hand corner on the back of each once we know
where it’s come from let’s have a look at the next one
another Let’s pop them out this way. I’m going to do them the right way up for you guys to look at, because also it’s probably less
distracting from me if the pictures are the wrong way up because I’m looking at colours rather than at the image. The first thing that really strikes me
is that these are all completely acceptable prints and I didn’t really
expect that. They’re also very slightly different from
one and other but not different enough for it to become an issue, and if you’re going to get something
printed by four different printers you’ve got to expect that to a certain
degree, because they’re all using different processes and different paper types. This one here – for example is on glossy paper where as the other
three are on lustre. I wanted to make it fair by having them
all printed on lustre, and lustre is the surface or tend to use because it’s non
reflective and it doesn’t show up finger marks if you’ve been handling your
prints. Unfortunately I’d already got three being done before I went into Boots, and Boots don’t offer lustre as an option. So this one is on Glossy paper. Glossy has a tendency to kind of lift
the contrast and gives an image slightly more punch, but the down side is is shows more reflections and it shows up finger marks if you touch them. As to the difference, what if we go here? These two at the top are very slightly warmer than the two at the bottom. There’s a little bit more yellow / gold
content in these two at the top. Now if you remember when we were the computer I added a bit of yellow so that’s going to be interesting to see what’s going on. And the acid test is going to be to
check them on the computer to see which match my monitor. I think it’s probably going to be this one. The thing to do now is head off to the ‘west wing’ and go and find out. Let’s let up our image and when you do this, load it in your photo editing software – don’t do it in Windows picture viewer or something like that
because it has little or no colour management compared to your photo editing software
and the better that software is the better the color management will be. I’m using adobe photoshop because that’s
what I use and it is very very good. There are a couple of things to bear in mind when you are doing a comparison like this as well. Firstly – projected light coming out of the monitor
is going to be much more powerful and vibrant than the reflected light bouncing off the surface of your print. Do you remember watching slides through
a projector onto a screen? They always looked super vibrant and exciting realy compared to a print of the same image. It is just a feature or function of projected light, It really does have that
kind of quality to it. The other is the light you’re going to do
this in. If you are going to do this in the lounge on a dark winter evening evening with the yellow tungsten lights on, you’ve got a yellow cast going on on everything, which your brain is colour correcting to an extent, but it is nonetheless going to alter the colors
of the print your looking at. The best place to do it is in day light. That’s why I was looking at them next to the window next door. But even day light changes color! In the morning and the evening it’s much
warmer, there’s more red in it is at mid day. If a cloud goes over the sun it will change color then. So I’m doing this in my work room where I
have a six thousand five hundred degree Kelvin bulb that’s not going to change
color at all. Six thousand five hundred calvin is the industry recognized collour
of daylight. There are no strong colored walls or anything it’s
very neutral so there’s no colour casts coming back off the walls. And finally I’m going to use a Monitor Hood. This is like a lens hood but it’s for your monitor. It just sits on the top and is held in place with a bit of Velcro. If I can make it fit properly!!! You could make one of these yourself out of
cardboard if you wanted to. Or just Google ‘Monitor Hoods and you’ll find loads of them
online. And finally (I’ve said that twice) you’ve got to be looking at your monitor
square on. If I i look at that from over there it goes a bit wishy washy and light. When you look at an LCD you have to be right in front of it – be careful that you
in front of it and be careful that you are. This did not happen with a Cathode ray monitor so I’m going to turn it this way to give you the best chance of seeing
what’s going on. I don’t know if the video camera is going to pick up the subtleties
that I’m expecting to see here. Prints… I don’t know if you can see it but this is warmer than the monitor. That’s interesting because I thought it
would be a warm one that would be closer to the monitor. That’s slightly warmer but not as warm as the last one. The sky is not bad, but again it’s just
over all a little bit warmer. That looks to me to be closer and it’s still a little bit warmer than
the monitor. That actually looks to be the closest.
That’s the Glossy ‘Boots’ print. That’s very interesting. But don’t forget it’s a glossy
print and glossy prints have more contrast. They certainly give the appearence of the white’s being whiter and the blacks being blacker and it will appear to be a bit more punchy. And this is a problem I know in this
test. But still – it is not bad and is pretty close to let’s go back and look at our luster prints because this is really
where it where it lies I think because these are all on the same
surface. I’d say that is …. what have we got…? Lets have a look and put them next to each other. So those are definitely two warmest ones. Putting them like that they are so similar. I’d say these – that one is a bit warmer that’s quite a lot warmer. Who is that from? That’s the Jessops print and it’s much
warmer. And these two That is a bit warmer again, that’s the ProAm Imaging print. They are all acceptable – it’s just fractionally warmer I’m being very ‘Nit-Picky’ here. If you are just looking at pictures you you wouldn’t see
this. I’m being picky as hell. So here we go – that’s slightly
warmer so that means that left behind is the Paul Williams Digital which is the closest of all the Lustre prints to what I’m getting out of the monitor. It doesn’t have quite the punch of the glossy ‘Boots’ print, but that’s something of an unfair comparison because if Paul had done it on a glossy paper as well it would’ve been much more accurate. However what we can draw from this is that Jessops, Boots and a professional printer like Paul Williams and a professional lab like ProAm have all produced very acceptable results. You are never going to get the monitor 100% the same. I have to confess I’m quite surprised by that. I expected Boots and Jessops to be lagging quite a long way behind. And they are not. That’s pretty good. Now then – let’s have a look at price and
service and all that kind of stuff. Who have we got here? That’s the Boots print which was 40p the price between boots and Jessops is
really quite negligible. Jessops were 55p Boots were 40p – there’s only 15p in it. One advantage of course was it was pretty quick. I went in there and used the one hour
service and because they were not very busy I was out again in a very very short time indeed. Normally in these places you go in
with your memory stick and poke it into the machine and it’s self-service. I have not anything printed it by Boots or Jessops in 15 years or more and in those days I gave a canister to a nice person behind the counter who wrote it on an envelope and dealt with it for me. I’m a bit rubbish with technology as you know and I had to ask the staff for a hand and they were very very helpful indeed and I said to them I don’t want any adjustment or manipulation on these images. I want them printed the way I have delivered them to you. And that’s what they’ve done. So, it’s pretty good service and a low price from both Boots and Jessops. ProAm imaging uh… professional service very good service are actually cheaper than Boots or Jessops at 36p. There is a ‘but’! When you’re only having one 36p print done you still have to pay for the postage and packing on top. And because it is a photograph they pack it really well, it is in a hard
well the sanity and plastic is in a hard board you know – in a wallet so it can’t get bent or
damaged by the time I paid for all that it was £5 in the end. If you are going to photograph a wedding and have 100 prints done then it is well worth doing because what
they send back is consistent and very very good and of course it is cheaper – but only if you get several prints done. Enlargements – I have to just say on the
side, are a lot cheaper than the high street when you go to someone like uh…
ProAm. Finally Paull williams this is the most expensive prints of a
lot at £1.75. But then you are getting are very experienced and personal
service. You could pick up the phone and say ‘can you do this or that’? And If he gets an image and
also if he got your image info on that thinks ‘that’s quite right’. He would then phone you to to check that
that’s how you want it done and if you needed a bit of a tweak or change he would do that for you. But of course it’s best to send your image to him in the first place – corrected. I know from experience their stuff is very very consistent. So that’s £1.75 and I must admit it has a much nicer
in a solicitor much nicer high-quality feel to it which kinda
surprised me because being as this is a top end inkjet print I expected the
photographic prints to feel better – but actually it doesn’t. So what we learn from this? Well interesting that you can get a
really great and acceptable print done in all sorts of places now. The advantage of the high street is it’s very fast if they’re not too busy. Prices are pretty low, uh… I can speak for the two branches
I went into but I’m very impressed with both of them. At the end of the day I would still
stick with my ‘Pro’ labs I have to say uh… particularly if i wanted a really
big print done because I just know that it will be absolutely ‘bang on’ and there’s no argument. So there we go. Very interesting results
from my point of view. Not quite what I expected to find out
but it is very very reassuring to know that these days I can go and get very good quality
print done almost anywhere. So you can get it out there being enjoyed.

75 thoughts on “Best Digital Photo Printing PT.2

  • January 11, 2013 at 7:49 pm
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    I don't think we'll be taking our prints, or asking advice of Jessops as from Friday. What a shame. They've given me good advice in the past, even if the company was a high street chain; all staff employed were photographers in one way or another.

    Reply
  • January 11, 2013 at 8:18 pm
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    Finally I can sleep in peace, knowing how it ends.

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  • January 11, 2013 at 8:29 pm
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    Good films Mike.. Appreciate your time and expertise on the subject of printing photos..

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  • January 11, 2013 at 8:34 pm
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    An interesting conclusion to the exercise. Well done for undertaking this comparative test.

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  • January 11, 2013 at 8:46 pm
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    Interesting one Mike, thanks. I have noticed that if I print at home on my canon printer it is very close to my monitor but prints form a lab can be warmer. I must say Boots colour on the gloss has a real punch.

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  • January 11, 2013 at 9:48 pm
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    unexpected results for me as well… i have never printed a photo with a pro lab and I was expecting way better quality. 🙂 Thanks for sharing this with us Mike 🙂

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  • January 11, 2013 at 10:52 pm
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    Thanks for making all these videos! I have really been enjoying your channel since I found it not long ago!! 🙂

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  • January 11, 2013 at 10:58 pm
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    Interesting that your mate was the most expensive Mike. Has he never heard of mate's rates?;) Seriously though it was a very interesting experiment

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  • January 11, 2013 at 11:06 pm
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    Some of the best advice on youtube, thanks for all the great tips you have one new subscriber 🙂

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  • January 11, 2013 at 11:44 pm
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    Thanks for that Mike, I´ve had some poor results from high street shops and expected you to pull them apart.It is nice to see thats not the case in the U.K. (I live in Spain.)
    Best wishes Colin

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  • January 11, 2013 at 11:50 pm
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    Good video mike. Is the lustre just a personal choice because of the shiny-ness and finger prints then? Or is there some other advantage over glossy prints? Thank you

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  • January 12, 2013 at 12:01 am
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    Hope you enjoyed the Jessops experience Mike. Sadly that was probably your last.

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  • January 12, 2013 at 12:29 am
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    Thanks for putting the time and effort into this experiment Mike. A real eye opener!

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  • January 12, 2013 at 4:16 am
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    I tend to use Tescos. I think that £1.20 for an 8×10 is quite reasonable and I can upload at home and collect when I do my shopping. So far I have been very happy with the result however, their 6×4 come out a mm short which is not too much of a problem unless you really wanted exactly 6×4. Similarly, I used Asda for satin prints with good results. Both use real photo (chemical) processing, not inkjet printing like the boots photobooth system.

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  • January 12, 2013 at 11:03 am
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    Hello Mike,

    Can you give us advise about large format prints for example A2, A1, and A0?

    Thanks

    Reply
  • January 12, 2013 at 2:54 pm
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    Thanks Mike. You didn't mention what the Paul Williams postage costs are. Could you tell us how much it cost to have your print posted?

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  • January 12, 2013 at 8:07 pm
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    keep that Jessops picture, arts museums will be wanting them in a couple of decades ;p

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  • January 13, 2013 at 1:30 am
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    So after all your messing about with your bulb and monitors ; you still ended up with warm pictures #Itsnottheprintitsyou

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  • January 13, 2013 at 9:19 am
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    Once again a great video Mike.

    Could you speculate on why the all prints turned out warmer, although you used a colour-managed workflow?

    Moreover, I urge you to join Google+. The place is crammed with photographers of all levels and I am sure you would find lots and lots of people and communities to interact with. And I should also mention that it would link your youtube channel to your profile 😉

    Reply
  • January 14, 2013 at 5:50 am
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    Thank you for sharing the video. 🙂

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  • January 15, 2013 at 4:06 am
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    Another fascinating subject for a video…and with a surprise ending. Thank you.

    Reply
  • January 16, 2013 at 9:29 pm
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    Gone join a photocursus in about 4 weeks … after seeing all your vids .. and practice the "tasks" you have said .. i wonder if they can teach me anything i have not already learned from watching you …. MANY MANY THANKS !!

    Reply
  • January 22, 2013 at 1:25 pm
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    Thank you – Mike

    Reply
  • January 25, 2013 at 6:33 am
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    I love your videos. They are very helpful.
    In pt 1 you were talking about Adobe RGB and sRGB. I've actually been checking out every printing service that I can find, and have found a several that won't or can't print images using Adobe RGB. There is also CMYK, but I've not found a single place that prints those. I want to have my photos printed as posters or on canvas. Do you have any suggestions about the sizes for those, as they are bigger than the original print size of the image?

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  • January 27, 2013 at 5:13 am
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    CMYK is mostly for newspapers and magazines. sRGB is the photographic standard, it will display identically on screens, in print or on canvas. Adobe RGB takes calibrated equipment and some tuned printing chops.

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  • January 28, 2013 at 12:25 pm
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    Hi – Stuart has explained the colour spaces perfectly. As for sizes, all the printers I know will print any size you ask them to. You will need to prepare the image in Photoshop by re-sizing it up to the size you want before you send it to them. Some labs will do it for you but you'd have to ask them. – Mike

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  • January 29, 2013 at 11:02 pm
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    Another awesome video, Mike! The next question that comes to my mind is comparing how these prints hold up over time. Perhaps the more expensive ones won't fade or lose color over time as quickly as the cheaper ones. If you still have these, you could toss them on a window still somewhere to catch some sunlight for a few months and compare results down the road. A Part 3. 😉

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  • January 31, 2013 at 6:10 pm
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    Any print will eventually fade when left in direct sunlight. However I have a Paul Williams Digital print which gets direct sunshine from sunrise to around mid day. It's been there over a year and no sign of fading yet. – Mike

    Reply
  • February 8, 2013 at 11:49 pm
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    what video camera you're using, it look so good capturing most of color differences between monitor & print.

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  • February 11, 2013 at 7:35 pm
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    It's a Sony EX1 – Mike

    Reply
  • February 14, 2013 at 3:32 am
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    There are inherent color limitations in printed images in comparison with the monitor, simply because the colors are produced by different means.

    To perform final adjustment and comparison with the print, one should select the printer color profile in the View/Proof setup menu and then use View/Proof Colors option. This will simulate the limitations of the printed image. Both the monitor and the printer need to be calibrated, and I suspect that the economy printer has not been in a long time.

    Reply
  • March 27, 2013 at 3:57 am
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    Interesting video. One thing, which is worth investigating is whether the print lab is using dye or pigment inks in their printers. Dye inks will generally give you wider gamut, but pigment inks are far more archival than dye.

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  • May 24, 2013 at 9:55 pm
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    I hope that you hang those prints on a wall somewhere, and post a video in a couple of years to show which prints fade the least! Fantastic review! Now it's just up to me to convince ProAm to ship to Scandinavia 😉

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  • May 28, 2013 at 11:18 am
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    Thank you – I expect they will – they're very helpful.

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  • June 26, 2013 at 7:38 pm
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    Hi Mike! What are your thoughts about putting a watermark on a photo that you want printed? Cheers!

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  • June 29, 2013 at 8:36 am
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    I don't watermark anything that goes to clients or on my wall – only proofs and some images I put on social sites and don't want anyone to pinch them. I've caught two photographers with my images on their websites suggesting them to be their own work. Lot's of photogs put small advertising marks in a bottom corner.

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  • July 3, 2013 at 5:14 pm
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    Ok got it. Thank you Mike! Cheers!

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  • July 4, 2013 at 4:25 pm
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    Pleasure:-)

    Reply
  • August 28, 2013 at 4:38 pm
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    loved the comparison, very interesting. good point on the lcd, why not use a crt if that's a problem inherent in lcd. wish i'd kept my old prinston.

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  • August 29, 2013 at 4:38 pm
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    Thank you. So long as you sit square to the LCD it's OK – and anyway it's hard if not impossible to get a CRT monitor these days.

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  • August 30, 2013 at 4:18 pm
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    My printers cropped my images, they said I should have preset Lightroom. How do I do this for a 10×8 that I want without cropping.

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  • September 2, 2013 at 5:36 am
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    Very interesting videos and result … thank you. What hardware and software do you use for colour calibration?

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  • September 2, 2013 at 6:06 pm
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    Thank you. I use a colourvision 2 which needs updating really. Still does the job though…

    Reply
  • September 3, 2013 at 10:20 am
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    I think the time has come to say THANK YOU for your Videos. I'm watching them since the beginning of my photography and learned a lot from you. Greetings from Rostock at the baltic sea in germany.

    Reply
  • September 6, 2013 at 5:23 pm
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    You’re welcome

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  • September 6, 2013 at 5:26 pm
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    Hmm – I don't know because I only print from Photoshop. Have a look at Serge Ramelli's channel – He's a Lightroom wizard and can probably help. /user/cmoeu

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  • September 13, 2013 at 12:35 pm
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    Interesting and informative video. I recently had a large print of a photograph done (my first in many years I should say) at a high street shop here in Spain and I was pleasantly surprised by the quality and the price. If the prints are for your self or family then I'd say it's a good bet. On another note I like your videos, always informative and well made. Thank you

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  • September 17, 2013 at 3:35 pm
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    Thank you

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  • December 19, 2013 at 7:40 am
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    sir I want to ask something I'm starting a business about photo, like 1×1 photo id and 2×2 etc. I'm experimenting some settings for good photo rendering and so far it hasn't meet my expectation, yet if you have a video about printing the photo using glossy paper or wooven paper it would be awesome, by the way I'm using epson stylus photo 1390 as my printer. Good day.

    Reply
  • January 1, 2014 at 3:44 pm
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    +Mike Browne
    the monitors use RGB colour scheme however the printers use CMYK colour scheme therefore the colour might be slightly different

    Reply
  • January 17, 2014 at 9:43 pm
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    Which is the warmer photo? this is all I learned from this vidéo, nothing technical!!!

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  • April 30, 2014 at 12:05 pm
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    Quick question, when you are sending the files in for a wedding say, which file format do you send to the lab. tiff, psd, etc ? or .. jpeg. Cheers.

    Reply
  • May 6, 2014 at 9:20 am
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    @wannaplaytwister Don't know why but your comments showing in my feed but not on the video. To answer your question what file format to send the lab it depends on the lab. I suggest you ask them which they prefer and how they want it set up.

    Reply
  • October 12, 2014 at 9:18 pm
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    This goes to show that, even with a calibrated monitor, the final print will not be as you set it! Which, for me is disappointing!! When I save a final image that I have spent time  adjusting it to 'WHAT I WANT!' then the guarantee of actually getting that is going to be 'Hit n miss' from the printers!! I thought 'STANDARD' meant just that! but not some interpretation of 'a' standard!! This vid has proved that I have to be REALLY picky as to  who I get my prints from! Professional or high street!! SO disappointed 🙁

    Reply
  • December 6, 2014 at 12:14 am
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    Over the past couple years I've been printing my photos at home. Finding reliable, quality print shops on a little island is not always easy.

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  • January 16, 2015 at 10:12 am
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    Great video Mike.  Love the informal style (and I recognise some of the locations…was that Bucklers Hard Marina?  It reminded me of it and I don't think you are too far away).  Keep them coming.

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  • March 3, 2015 at 8:56 pm
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    Thanks! A really great 2 part video. Can you inform me what version of photoshop you was using in those videos and also can the prolab place accept and duplicate anything like a square shaped 2000dpi x 2000dpi (4K) image by email? Many thanks

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  • April 17, 2015 at 6:55 pm
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    do you regulate the monitor , color balance etc…

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  • April 23, 2015 at 12:10 am
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    Mike a great video.. Very easy viewing on the eye and gentle on the ear.. Looking at the test prints me thinks the best 1 – when held up to your monitor was the Jessop print!

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  • July 13, 2015 at 6:15 am
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    nice video as always Mr. Mike Browne.  I would have liked this video even more if u had used a home printer also in the comparison and made a copy yourself.

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  • January 10, 2016 at 7:06 am
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    The question is, how many filters they apply on your data… I'd expect they do at least a white balance, so all the effort to adjust colors in advance is obsolete. Another thing I can recommend is to let the software display (simulate) the print output and highlight all non-printable colors (Lightroom ca do it, and most professional software should do so, too). You'll be amazed, how many colors (especially green, orange, violet…) cannot be "mixed" by the printer.

    Reply
  • January 12, 2016 at 6:37 pm
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    Interesting. I use Photobox and always find the prints I receive are slightly darker overall than on my monitor. I have been told if you are to print then to add extra sharpening and make it brighter prior to sending for printing.

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  • January 24, 2016 at 8:35 pm
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    very interesting video very helpful too great to know these comparisons thanks

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  • February 23, 2016 at 1:03 am
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    Hi Mike, Costco also do a very good service and only in the last month you can download there printer profile for your PC, they use Fujicolor Crtstal Archive Paper. 8×12 = £1.29, 24×36 =£10.99. cheers.

    Reply
  • September 20, 2016 at 4:24 pm
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    interesting

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  • August 20, 2017 at 11:18 am
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    Another great video, and although you can tell you favour the pro printers it was a very fair and unbiased testing with honest results.

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  • November 27, 2017 at 8:58 pm
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    Mike as far as i can see the gloss is 99% perfect to the picture you have on the computer but like you i don't print on gloss as fingerprints after time can stain the picture.

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  • December 27, 2017 at 4:45 pm
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    thanks mike, for this helpful video.

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  • February 24, 2018 at 2:50 am
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    Hi Mike. Great video. Very informative. I found one of your videos last night while seeking information about monitor calibration, and how the surrounding light should be during calibration. I have decided that I am going to improve my skills and knowledge of digital photography and video. I plan to do all of my own prints, and hopefully more.
    I recently purchased a Panasonic G9, a computer, a Benq SW2700PT monitor, a Datacolor SpyderPro 5 and an Epson Surecolor P800 inkjet printer. I haven't yet messed with any calibration because the manufacturer says it comes pre-calibrared snd provides a calibration document with the monitor. I had it in mind that the room should be completely darkened for calibration. So I spent the time and money blocking as much light as possible.
    Then last night I watched your calibration video and learned that I should be using thr studio natural light instead. So today I went to the local Camera shop and purchased a bulb for this. The only one they had on hand was a bulb with the 5500 Kelvin rating. I have placed this light in a position about 6 feet to the right of the monitor and angled the bulb into the corner of the wall space to help more evenly distribute the light. I have left the blinds closed and the black light blocking curtains up in the same place. The room lights up, just okay with no glare on the screen. Do you think this will suffice? Thank you, and I have subscrbed, and look forward to more of your videos. JW

    Reply
  • May 1, 2018 at 7:21 pm
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    None matched the monitor screen, but he dialled in yellow, which isn't there now?

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  • June 17, 2018 at 6:24 pm
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    A lot depends on what you want the print for. On cheaper paper the lab wins every time, but once you get up to the fibre based papers and using the profiles and soft proofing in Lightroom, with a decent printer it’s much better printing yourself. Printing has quietly advanced a lot in the last 5 years, partly because of inks and the hardware, also partly because of the papers and Adobe. Papers that exist now like Canson Platine Rag Fibre weren’t even heard of a few years ago. It isn’t all that long ago you thought it was a miracle if your ink lasted 200 minutes without fading, now it lasts 200 years and it doesn’t clog like it used to do.

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  • August 23, 2018 at 1:46 pm
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    Great Video , I print at home most of the time but have used High street for some canvas work 30 x90 & was excellent service

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  • August 23, 2018 at 8:42 pm
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    thank you very helpful

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  • April 13, 2019 at 4:14 pm
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    can anybody help me to find this monitor hood, i mean which online shop or offline shop ??

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  • May 13, 2019 at 11:49 am
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    Good day Mike Browne: Please let me know, if I took a shot using OPPO F11 or VIVO V15 with camera of 48 MPixels then print the image in canvas using the hp large-format printer, will I get excellent print output? Thanks and GOD Bless!

    Reply

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