3D PRINTED Moka Pot – Brewing real coffee with Formfutura Volcano PLA

3D PRINTED Moka Pot - Brewing real coffee with Formfutura Volcano PLA



Oh, I need a coffee! What the….? In today’s video, I’m going to show you
how you can use your 3D prints at higher temperatures. Guten Morgen everybody, I’m Stefan and welcome
to CNC Kitchen. So before I start a short disclaimer. I did not drink the coffee since the material
is not yet rated for being food safe and I also don’t recommend anyone to 3D print
pressure vessels especially ones that contain boiling water. The purpose of this video is to show you that
3D printing is more than printing fidget spinners. If you know your application and have chosen
the suitable material you can do pretty cool things with it. So I’ve been testing the Formfutura Volcano
filament for a couple of months and was looking for a cool application that can demonstrate
the exciting properties of it. I’m a hobby barista myself and thought 3D
printing a moka pot would be something really cool which I’ve never seen so far done by
anyone. I went for the classic and iconic octagon
design which was designed and invented by Alfonso Bialetti in the 1930s and mass produced
after WW2. Even though many people especially here in
Germany call it an espresso cooker it actually brews moka. The distinction is that in such a cooker the
brewing pressure is only up to 1.5bars and not the around 9bars that you need for a real
espresso. Its design is actually pretty simple. It consists out of a bottom chamber which
is filled with water, a funnel with a sieve that contains the ground coffee and a collection
chamber. When the water is heated and comes to a boil
the steam creates pressure in the bottom chamber forcing the hot water through the funnel and
the coffee up to the collection chamber. So when we want to 3D print it we do not only
need to cope with the temperatures but also the stresses which are created by the pressure. Also, since it is a multi-part design and
needs to seal, all the parts need to have tight tolerances. Formfuturas Volcano filament is a modified
PLA. Normal PLA severely softens at around 60°C
and that is also the same with the Volcano filament. But there is a way to beef up the properties
of actually all PLA filaments, which is called annealing. I did make a video about this process a couple
of weeks ago. There should be a link plopping up in the
upper right corner if you want to learn more about the details. Annealing PLA means that you put the printed
part into an oven at a temperature of around 100°C, for the Volcano filament 110°C to
be precise, keep it there for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the thickness of your part and
then slowly cool it down to ambient temperatures. During that time, the material crystalizes
which improves the temperature resistance a lot. The PLA can now withstand temperatures up
to 160°C. Way more than most other materials you can use on an FDM printer. As usual, there is a downside. Normal PLA shrinks quite a lot during this
process. This screws up all of your dimensions, which
can be compensated, but is not optimal. Formfutura Volcano is modified in a way that
the shrinkage during annealing is minimal leaving you with a well-fitting part after
the process. The material does have a lower tensile strength
than normal PLA but on the other hand is much less brittle and has an impact strength comparable
to ABS. You also need to store the material at a dry
place because it seems to absorb more moisture than regular PLA. I will post a proper review with the mechanical
strength values as soon as I have my test setup figured out. So I went into Autodesk Fusion 360 and created
my own 3D printable version of the Bialetti. I needed to have a thin bottom in order to
work on my induction stove. Then I knew that there will be pressure building
up in the lower chamber so I did a crude finite element analysis in Fusion to figure out the
rough stresses that 1 bar of pressure will create, just to see if it was even possible
to have the thing not explode in my kitchen. I added fine threads to close the pot and
tried applying all design rules necessary to have the parts printing with the least
amount of supports. I printed all of the parts, one by one, on
my Original Prusa i3 at 210°C nozzle and 60°C bed. I had to add a steel washer to the lower chamber
during the print because otherwise the plastic part would not heat up on my induction oven. All the parts do have a very nice, matt surface
finish and also the overall print quality is very decent. The design does include two sieves which hold
the ground coffee in place. They are also 3D printed and I used a neat
technique to print them very nicely. I deactivated the top and bottom layers in
Slic3r and increased the number of perimeters. If you use a rectilinear infill pattern and
set an infill density of around 60 to 80% you get very nice and consistent looking sieves
from your 3D printer. This might also be interesting for some other
projects. I preheated my oven to 110°C and put a flat
piece of aluminum in it. After the preheating was done I quickly put
the parts on the aluminum and set the timer for 30 minutes at which point the oven slowly
cooled down to ambient temperature. Just for the fun of it I put the knob, which
I printed in regular black PLA, on the lid during the annealing process because I knew
that it would shrink and therefore establish a press fit with the stud on the lid which
perfectly worked. The parts did assemble beautifully, neither
better nor worse than before the annealing process. Then it was time for the test. I added ground coffee and put it on my induction
stove. After some tense minutes with me wearing full
safety gear and being afraid that I might put coffee on all of the walls in the kitchen
the first drops of dark liquid rose through the tube and a delicious smell of freshly
brewed coffee started filling to room. I was so happy that this worked out! Nerdy as this is I had to serve it in this
stormtrooper espresso mug, also printed in Volcano. I used the cooker a couple of times more and
did not have any problems with it. Nothing melted or obviously degenerated. Really cool. So if you are looking for a material that
need to withstand higher temperatures definitely take a look at Formfuturas Volcano filament. It prints as easy as regular PLA and does
not emit the toxic fumes as most of the other high temperature filaments. The material should be available worldwide
at all Formfutura resellers. If you buy it from formfutura.com and use
the discount code that you can find in the description below, you will get 17.5% off
your purchase on all of their products. If you liked the video then help me out and
give it a thumbs up. If you want to see more than consider subscribing
and supporting me via PayPal or use my Amazon affiliate links. Thanks for watching, auf wiedersehen and I
will see you next time!

45 thoughts on “3D PRINTED Moka Pot – Brewing real coffee with Formfutura Volcano PLA

  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    This guy passed on his print being water tight, even under pressure, so casually. Does anyone know how to do this? I have been trying to get reliable water tight prints for months…

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Intro is implausible. By the time his coffee maker was finally printed, he would have fallen asleep from caffeine deficiency! 🙂

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    I successfully installed a paper coffee filter into the bottom inner perimeter of a PLA funnel for a reusable filter for a 5 cup coffee maker!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    haste evtl die .STL

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Well done. I love it. Keep thinking!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Why do German youtubers end their videos with "see you next time"? GreatScott says it too and uses the exact same tone. Is it a coincidence or does it derive from some German phrase?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Isn't it poisonous to mix boiling water with plastic?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Portfilter. Now THAT´S a 3D printing person with a good taste for coffee!

    Siebträger ftw!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    yeahhh Iw ouldn't do that personally.. don't like any plastic near my food 🙂

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    designs and prints in 10 seconds without any failed prints and issue and 1 hour of settings tuning 😀 so unrealistic (I know this is a fun video and not a reforestation but before I bought one I saw all this thinking it's easy… Lol girl was I wrong…)

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    YOU SCARED MY CAT WITH THAT ALARM

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    How much compressive force it can take in 110 celsius? Real world application. Thanks.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    There is some debate on the safety of PLA. While PLA in itself is safe, you don't know what processing methods and additives were added to the filaments.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    You can use Formfutura STYX-12 instead of Volcano PLA, the STYX-12 are FDA compliant.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Still, the plastic is not safe to use for hot coffee and other foodstuff.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Hi! Ended up here because I need a part for my Krups coffee maker 🙂
    I'm planning on buying my first 3D printer today, Black Friday, and am looking at the Anycubic i3 Mega. Should this Volcano filament work well with that machine, you think?

    Reply
  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    I soure will not drink that cofee, because of toxic chemichals from plastic leaking into it.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Brilliant. I love it!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    I'm having trouble extruding vulcano pla, on all of the prints it stopped extruding at the 1mm in height. I tried temperatures ranging from 200 – 250 degrees. Any ideas what's causing this? Thanks!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    wow this is so great. What filament would you suggest to use to make wax moulds? I want to make wax mould for lost waxing investment casting.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    wouldent this cause toxins in the body? possible cancer or hormone changes?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    So, this raises two immediate and very important questions:
    (well, 3 actually)

    1. Is the filament capable of withstanding the temperatures involved.
    2. Is the filament regarded as food safe?
    3. Regardless of the material itself, does the printing process contaminate the print in a way that would render it unsafe for use with food?

    Printing items that are related to food handling has a few innate extra risks unfortunately…

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    I appreciate your knowledge and skill. A commercial brewer will be much cheaper.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Impressive!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Was that washer galvanized? Did it affect the taste?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Very well done video and very well described.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    How does this material stack up with makergeeks raptor series pla which is food safe?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    You get a thumbs down for the opening sound making me think my fire alarm was going off.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    I just saw your CR-10 review, and was happy to find a good and objective review. Then I find out that you're a lapavoni lever machine owner and eureka grinder (as I do). Well, you got one more subscriber 😊

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    gorgeous print, too bad it cannot be used, it would be so cool!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    https://www.partsbuilt.com/ seems to be the only supplier in the US. They have a full selection of other engineering filaments and Taulman at good prices. You might want to do the affiliate thing with them.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Cool! But you could not pay me to drink out of it…

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    If you don't have an induction stove, could you just put the whole coffe pot in a microwave oven instead (without the steelwasher)?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    This is very cool!

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Any tips for food safe fillaments ( does not have to be PLA ) for stuff like cookie cutters and so on?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Very nice espresso grinder you linked there ;D

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Lots of misinformation in the comments regarding safety :/

    1. PLA itself is simply lactic acid, which is what builds up in our muscles from exercise and is largely responsible for muscle soreness the next day after some heavy physical activity – it's being produced by your body's metabolism as you read this, and there is always measurable amounts in our blood. It's also present in many foods, especially fermented dairy (cheese, kefir, sour cream). PLA is poly lactic acid, which is simply lactic acid that has been linked to itself in a chain. It does not contain BPA or any other xenoestrogen. In fact, the only plastic that contains trace amounts of BPA is polycarbonate.

    2. PLA as a material is not only safe, but biocompatible. That means it can be used as a material for surgical procedures where something made out of PLA will actually be implanted in your body. This requires a much higher degree of safety/compatibility than merely passing something through your GI tract. I can speak from personal experience: I snapped my ACL skiing some years ago, and they cut out a piece of another ligament to create a replacement, then bolted the strip of knee meat directly onto onto both bones of my knee joint. They actually drilled holes into the bone, threaded them, and (hopefully using knippex cobras 😉 ), screwed bolts into those bones to hold the new ligament in place until it grafted onto the bone by itself.

    Those bolts were made entirely of PLA. Conveniently, PLA will eventually be broken down and absorbed just like any other lactic acid, but it takes a couple months or so. So the screws don't have to be removed, they just get metabolized (but slowly enough so they hold stuff in place long enough for it to heal.

    3. PLA as a filament is only food safe if that specific filament is food rated (meaning FDA approved in the US at least, I'm sure there is something similar in the EU). This means that the feed resin was processed in a way that ensures nothing unsafe as leached into it from equipment etc., that the filament was likewise extruded with equipment that wouldn't leach anything or maybe extruded through stuff that had also extruded other things like ABS. And finally, it means that any additives/colorants mixed into the filament is also food grade. Most PLA filament is not food safe simply because it uses unsafe dyes to color it, so you do need to use filament that is explicitly rated for food contact. PETG is also safe and can be found in food grades.

    4. Unfortunately, even if you use food grade filament, that doesn't make anything you print safe for food contact. Food safe filament is only one piece of that puzzle. The filament must be food safe, but so does every part of the 3D printer that it touches as it is extruded into a 3d printed object. As far as I know, there is no food-rated extruder and hot end available at this time.

    5. If you're thinking about ignoring #4 for personal use… you really shouldn't. A standard E3D hotend seems innocent enough, right? Well, most brass contains 1-2% lead by weight, and lead has a much lower melting point than brass. This means it migrates to the surface as the brass alloy cools, and can leach out easily. The end result is that most industrial brasses, like the kind used in brass nozzles, leach lead out and onto anything they come into contact with at a much higher rate than one would expect given the amount of lead in the brass.

    So you can definitely expect anything printed with a brass nozzle to contain lead. And there is no safe level for lead exposure. And it is cumulative, you basically want to minimize lead ingestion over your entire lifetime.

    That's just one of the issues that one might not expect. Sure, you might use a stainless steel nozzle, and I wouldn't be surprised if that yielded mostly food-safe prints. But it might not, and I don't think anyone has really done the studies yet to make sure.

    TLDR: for now, keep 3d printing away from your mouth.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    du bist GENIAL! das einzige richtige Kaffee -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JSyCKx5dLE

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    People seriously need to go look at some images of ceramic dinnerware or drink ware that's magnified if they think its 'safe'…everyone is so concerned with the layers of 3D printed material getting ick in between..LOL..you get more toxins in the food you eat every day or in the air you breathe, or the water you consume in plastic bottles..just because the holy FDA 'says' its safe, doesn't mean it is. The FDA also claims vaccines are safe..but they contain a host of fatal toxins {formaldehyde being one…think 'embalming fluid'} and people have no thought at all getting loads of them throughout their lifetimes…Seriously ppl, wash your plastic cups and dinnerware in hot scalding bleach water, rinse and go on with it..stop being so scared

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    The material PLA (with no addatives) is food sage. However by producing models via FDM tehchnique ( the way 3dprinters does) creates physical layers with gaps in betweem them in the model. This creates places for bacteria and dirt to accumalate which makes them unusable for long term use but perfectly fine for one-time use. Ways to prevent this would be to use a filler of some sorts or vapor smoothing.

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Wow, are you an engineer
    for Mercedes Benz or BMW?

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    Food safe?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuyys1YpAVw

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  • July 25, 2019 at 2:53 pm
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    your channel really amazing thumbs up

    Reply

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