📷 Frozen Soap Bubbles Photography Tutorial ❄️ Benjamin Jaworskyj

📷 Frozen Soap Bubbles Photography Tutorial ❄️ Benjamin Jaworskyj


Hi and welcome this video, today I show
you how to take great photos like this, of frozen soap bubbles in ice cold winter. A great thing that you can do in winter
is blowing some soap bubbles and let them freeze and photograph them. It’s an
awesome effect you get those nice, yeah like leave ice things,
on the surface. It looks like art itself and then you take photos of it. So
it’s like double art, but it’s a pain in the ass to make those bubbles to
get them frozen and in this video I show you how it works and how we can take
photos of that. I tried it for at least let’s say three or four days to get a
nice photo of a frozen soap bubble. It’s so hard that they stay on one place and
don’t pop before they freeze, it has to be cold enough,
there should be no wind at all because just a bit small piece of wind and the
soap bubble, when it’s freezing and it will pop, because when it’s freezing it’s
not smooth anymore it’s not that soft anymore and gets very hard and then it pops.
So what I would recommend you is, first of all some soap bubble thing. You can buy
it everywhere in supermarkets and stuff and I added some sugar inside, so just a
piece of sugar and then I mixed everything and then the soap bubbles are
a bit more solid and they don’t pop that fast. That is a good trick and then I
would look for a smooth surface like ice or something, like some metal or
something, that will stay much more easier. It does not have to be that cold we have
like minus 5 degrees Celsius right now. When you live in Russia
you have like minus 20 degrees it would be much better but minus 5 is nice. As well
when it’s cold it freezes faster when it’s not that cold it takes some time
but it works as well and the colder the soap bubbles are, so when they stay for
some time outside the easier it works as well. So when you have them in there in
your pocket or something it will take much longer to freeze. So the photographing
is the easiest part, the hardest part is to get the bubbles somewhere and get it
frozen. So what I do I just blow the bubbles, oh there was just one bubble and
then I catch it and then I put it on some surface. Let’s say on this here and
I just put it then I do it like this and then it stays. Not bad
you see I did a lot of times, honestly I did it for four days and I did no good
photo. Today is the first day I could take photos. Yeah then you have to wait
till it freezes and then comes the photo part. Look it’s so solid that’s the sugar
inside, great. For the photo part I have my Sony a6000
i have a 70 to 200 millimeter lens and let’s tell the camera settings. I’m on f6.3,
1/500 shutterspeed and ISO 800. The ISO depending on
how dark it is. Here is a pretty dark spot and the sun as a backlight. So I had
to put the ISO up, but it’s a very nice effect with a backlight because all the
structures of the ice on the soap bubble are visible then. When you have no
backlight it’s much harder to get the structure visible and as already
mentioned it is a pain in the ass, to get them frozen. If you get them on a spot
without popping, that is the hardest part. White balance I’m right now in shadow
but you can do it in auto or something. I’m on manual focus but you can do it on
auto focus as well just put the focus point on the soap bubble that you don’t
focus in the background. For my photo I had the sun as a backlight. I had a
snowy icy peak and then I had a very low perspective that I could put the soap
bubble more in the sky and had a nice bokeh in the background and that’s it
that’s how you can take nice photos of soap bubbles. You can do it without a
telephoto lens, in white angle it’s much harder because what works best what I
recognize is, small bubbles they freeze easier, they don’t pop that fast, you can
place them easier on subjects and with big bubbles they look nice in real life
and they look nice when they are freezing but they pop very fast so try
to use the small bubbles and in the picture you won’t see it different. If it’s a small
or if it’s a big bubble and the smaller the bubble the nice of the bokeh. All right give it a try. I’m looking
forward for your photos, just put it in the comment section with a link, or put
it on my Facebook page, or just put it on instagram with #jaworskyj and
yeah have some fun outside with your kids, or alone, or with the friends and don’t
be sad if it don’t work out it the first time I took three or four days to get a
nice picture out of it but it’s fun to watch, it’s fun to do and you get outside,
get some fresh air so it’s worth to try. Alright I wish you all the best and never
forget, Sag mal Einstellung Digga! und haut rein! Oh and don’t forget to subscribe to
the YouTube channel it’s all about photography on this channel, so see you next time. you

35 thoughts on “📷 Frozen Soap Bubbles Photography Tutorial ❄️ Benjamin Jaworskyj

  • January 25, 2017 at 5:05 pm
    Permalink

    irgendwie kommst du in den englischen Videos noch verrückter (im positiven) rüber 😀

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 5:27 pm
    Permalink

    these toturials are the best

    shows u every thing

    thanks bro

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 6:57 pm
    Permalink

    Just amazing
    #bubbles

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 7:09 pm
    Permalink

    coool danke ben, dass du deine experimentierlust mit uns teilst!!!😍😄👌

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 7:26 pm
    Permalink

    Kommt grad zur richtigen Zeit , die Temperatur outside paßt !

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 9:22 pm
    Permalink

    A friend sent me a link to your video! I live in Eastern Canada and have tried this experiment. You're right, it's a pain in the a$$ to get the right conditions to blow frozen bubbles and get great pictures 🙂 I managed to get some pretty decent shots on the second day of trying! Great video! Cheers!

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 9:45 pm
    Permalink

    I blew my bubbles with a straw by the way. I wonder if this was such a great idea as the warm air from the lungs probably affects the speed at which the bubble freezes. Hope you experiment more with these frozen bubbles, and please let us see more photos. Forgot to tell you I used a macro lens! 🙂

    Reply
  • January 25, 2017 at 9:51 pm
    Permalink

    Wie geil! sag Einstellung Digga auf englisch. ..sag Einstellung Digga !:-)

    Reply
  • January 26, 2017 at 12:24 am
    Permalink

    When you said you put a, "piece", of sugar inside, did you actually mean one piece (as in one grain) or a few? If you could clarify that, it would be greatly appreciated. Great video btw!

    Reply
  • January 26, 2017 at 8:14 am
    Permalink

    Großartiges video! Werde es am Wochenende gleich ausprobieren 🙂

    Reply
  • January 26, 2017 at 10:34 am
    Permalink

    Ein guter Tipp für Dich: etwas Tapetenkleister in die Lösung rein und die Blasen halten noch besser.

    Reply
  • January 26, 2017 at 3:03 pm
    Permalink

    Leider nicht ganz richtig die Flüssigkeit vorher zu kühlen. Heiß wäre am besten. Auch wenn es blöd klingt es friert schneller. Physik lässt grüßen 🙂

    Reply
  • January 26, 2017 at 3:09 pm
    Permalink

    Geil Ben💪🏻💪🏻💪🏻👍🏻

    Reply
  • January 26, 2017 at 4:30 pm
    Permalink

    I gave it a shot! (no pun intended)

    https://flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157676001256803

    Reply
  • February 5, 2017 at 6:38 pm
    Permalink

    Nicely done!

    Reply
  • March 11, 2017 at 10:59 pm
    Permalink

    Trying today!

    Reply
  • June 7, 2017 at 2:17 pm
    Permalink

    Like the idea, however I'll have to wait for winter and go north as I live in New Mexico.

    Reply
  • December 28, 2017 at 10:24 am
    Permalink

    Awesome tips! Great video! 😀

    Reply
  • December 28, 2017 at 7:04 pm
    Permalink

    I have a question, not about the content of the video itself, but more about what you're shooting with, and more importantly how you achieved that really good bokeh ????? I want that for my videos!!! I just can't get that no matter how hard I try!

    Reply
  • December 30, 2017 at 7:40 pm
    Permalink

    Got some on my first try. We didn’t have any bubble solution so I made one with 1cup water, 1/2 cup dish soap and I added about 1/4 cup of corn syrup to make them strong. I used a straw cut at an angle to blow the bubbles and kept them relatively small. Now I just need to wait for better lighting conditions! Thanks for the inspiring tutorial.

    Reply
  • December 31, 2017 at 7:41 pm
    Permalink

    Thank you so much for your tips – the suggestion that the solution be cold, and the catching of the bubbles to carefully place where you want them was the thing that made it come together for me. Thank you again – from Canada (-32 today)

    Reply
  • January 1, 2018 at 9:01 pm
    Permalink

    Nice Video Can't Wait To Try This!!!
    Super helpful

    Reply
  • January 2, 2018 at 1:21 pm
    Permalink

    So much knowledge so low skils

    Reply
  • January 2, 2018 at 7:38 pm
    Permalink

    So a 50mm f1.8 lens would work and give you a nice blurred background? What do you think on that one.

    Reply
  • January 4, 2018 at 2:52 am
    Permalink

    This is the best video I’ve seen on photographing frozen soap bubbles. Thank you!

    Reply
  • January 4, 2018 at 8:12 pm
    Permalink

    Woah, this video is so cool! This is the BEST Satisfying video I have ever seen! Thanks! Gotta try it out some days. (:

    Reply
  • January 8, 2018 at 10:46 am
    Permalink

    Next time I try this, I might actually succeed – thanks to this video 🙂
    Thanks!

    Reply
  • January 20, 2018 at 2:04 pm
    Permalink

    wow sir

    Reply
  • January 22, 2018 at 10:44 am
    Permalink

    I like yoooou!!!!! Great video! I'm jealous of the beautiful adventures you partake in, lol. Great work, glad I found this video!

    Reply
  • October 14, 2018 at 11:49 pm
    Permalink

    You are awesome!!! Much love from canada… first page I've seen on YouTube that I can honestly say I enjoy and subscribed to not out of boredom but because it's fun and you learn alot!

    Reply
  • December 12, 2018 at 5:49 pm
    Permalink

    Brilliant… now i have to wait for some freezing conditions in Iceland for this to happen…. Great tutorial..

    Reply
  • January 14, 2019 at 6:53 pm
    Permalink

    Living in the UK we dont really get freezing conditions, but i will give it a try if we get some snow, thanks 🙂

    Reply
  • January 18, 2019 at 2:57 pm
    Permalink

    I really hope I can make these as well as soon as it snows here in Germany! I really want those as a diorama for my toyphotography :3

    Reply
  • February 3, 2019 at 5:18 pm
    Permalink

    I found this recipe and it works really well. One cup of water, 2 tablespoons dish soap, 2 tablespoons of corn syrup, 2 tablespoon of sugar. Put it in a jar with a lid and keep in the refrigerator.

    Reply
  • March 30, 2019 at 4:03 pm
    Permalink

    I love your videos! I'm in other beginner groups and I feel so intimated. I often said I need a pre beginner class, one that shows an photo example as well as tell you the exact settings. This is it! ❤❤❤

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *